S3 E36 — Placebo, Meaningful Coincidence or Just Feeling Lucky

Luck is a form of superstition. We already mentioned how Carl Jung coined the term synchronicity, which he described as “a meaningful coincidence”.  Some evidence supports the idea that belief in luck acts like a placebo, producing positive thinking and improving people’s responses to events.

“5”  Steve McQueen (1930 – 1980): The first idea that comes to you may indeed be the best one, but come up with more anyway, if only for the accompanying thrill of heading into unexplored directions.” Aries

Hi and welcome to Thursday’s Episode 36 in Season 3 of  My Paradoxically Normal Year” on this 29th day of April in the spring of 2021 — which is a three-year examination of how bits of wisdom changed during the “normal” pre-pandemic year and then in the pandemic year, and now months after.

The Tau of Steves: What You Don’t Know Could Fill a Book

Table of Contents

Previously from Season Three, the Paradoxically Normal Year

S3 E35This Ain’t No Zemblanity; S3 E34Why You’re Susceptible to Subliminal Suggestions Like …; S3 E33Do Meaningful Coincidences Really Exist?

Related from Season Two, The Pandemic Year

S2 E36Turning Lemons into Margaritas; S2 E35Was this Pandemic Year a 1-Off or New Way of Life?; S2 E34Why Is This Kicking Off the 4th Industrial Revolution?; S2 E33What Happens When Your Business Collapses?

Related from Season One, The Normal Year

S1 E36Day 36 of My 1-Year Experiment; S1 E35Day 35 of My 1-Year Experiment ; S1 E34Day 34 of My 1-Year Experiment; S1 E33Day 33 of My 1-Year Experiment

Context

In the Report’s Conclusion Section of The One-Year Natural Experiment we’ve covered meaningful coincidences and synchronicity, now it’s about their second cousin,  serendipity or happy accidents as in unplanned, but fortunate discoveries. Diving deeper into Wikipedia I found luck. 

Isn’t that what we all hope for? Yeah, I thought so and that’s why this section of the natural experiment’s conclusions is:

Do I Feel Lucky?

Harry Callahan: You’ve Got To Ask Yourself One Question: ‘Do I Feel Lucky? ‘ Well, Do Ya, Punk?

There’s Dirty Harry and Harry Bosch.  While Michael Connelly’s  Detective Harry Bosch doesn’t believe in coincidences I just read a passage in “Black Box” where he drew energy after getting lucky — he knew reporters follow a story which leads to another and another or to a trusted source.

“But Bosch stayed positive.  He’d gotten lucky with Pistol Pete and the serial number.  There was no reason to think it wouldn’t hold. 

Of course, Harry had a run in with his newer Lieutenant a page or two later …

“So much for his luck holding… he felt that more than his luck suddenly ebbing away.  His momentum and positive attitude were eroding. It suddenly felt like it was getting dark out.”

We talk about luck in improbable, negative or positive terms as random or chance events beyond our control which occur all around us.

Luck is a form of superstition. We already mentioned how Carl Jung coined the term synchronicity, which he described as “a meaningful coincidence”. 

Some evidence supports the idea that belief in luck acts like a placebo, producing positive thinking and improving people’s responses to events.

Richard Wiseman did a ten-year scientific study… concluding, to a large extent, people make their own good and bad fortune.

His research revealed that, Lucky people generate their own good fortune via four basic principles. 

They are skilled at: 

          • creating and noticing chance opportunities, 
          • making lucky decisions by listening to their intuition, 
          • creating self-fulfilling prophecies via positive expectations, and 
          • adopting a resilient attitude that transforms bad luck into good.

We’ve heard from two Harrys, a Michael, a Carl and a Richard.  What say we turn our attention to four of my favorite Steves?

Evidence

You know Zahnny, I have to disagree with your opening premise.  I could agree if you added “but there are certainly ideal tribes which I call Talent Cultures in organizations, and (this is a big and) if you know which of 16 Talent Profiles you can claim, then you can more easily select the best and worst organizations and growth stages to pursue. 

To your second Holiday Tau observation — yes, organizational change happens slowly and, thank you that fact alone provided years of consulting fees for me in mature companies heading towards decline, but desperately wanting to reinvent themselves.  

“5”  Steve Zahn, 51: “There are no ideal groups, though it’s fun to imagine things being better. Organizational change tends to happen very slowly; changing yourself is relatively quick and doing so will affect the entire group.” Scorpio

Random ones that make me want change my sign.

Which way should I interpret your TauBit of Wisdom, Steve?  My first take more easily fit this passion project, especially as I write up my natural experiment’s report.  But now rereading it — probably influenced by Zahnny — I might reclassify it from practical, project and task orientation to how I went about my role as an external consultant and an intrapreneur in those declining organizations.

“5”  Steve McQueen (1930 – 1980): Because you want to make your work the best it can be, you’re willing to entertain new ideas. You’ll banter, twist and play around with your resources. Changes and add-ons will take it to the next level.” Aries

WTF G&G?  How lucky am I?  All three of today’s Holiday Tau, yours included, describe what was foremost in how I approached my professional career and peeled away the onion layers to find the simplest answer to complicated challenges. Thanks, Steves.

“5”  Steve Greene, 34; Steve Guttenberg, 61:Complex problems may not require complex solutions. However, finding the solution that works may be a long and winding journey that seems complicated indeed! Regardless, stay in it for the long haul and the satisfying end.” Virgo

What’s Going On

Literally Bottled and Set Adrift from KnowWhere Atoll 

    • @KnowLabs suite of digital magazines jumps from 8003 to 8068 organically grown followers

Foresight

Quality-of-Life 

Long-Form

    • “Consilience: The Unity of Knowledge” by E.O. Wilson, an entomologist who studied colonies of ants for their insights.  But didn’t stop there, according to The Wall Street Journal, “A dazzling journey across the sciences and humanities in search of deep laws to unite them.”
    • “True Believers,” the novel by Kurt Andersen (which seems to precede Fantasyland)? I like how he goes back and forth from now to the ‘60s in which the main character is writing a memoir, but needs “Okays” from her friends who had been hiding a secret for 40+ years that could ruin their careers?  Like, what’s my equivalent?
    • “Disappearing Through the Skylight” by O.B. Hardison, Jr. which proceeded “Consilience” by a decade.  Hardison’s been described as a polymathic renaissance man who wrote, “… Nature has slipped, perhaps finally beyond our field of vision.”  What does it mean for “… science, history, art and architecture, music, language, ultimately, for humanity”? This one provides missing chunks of understanding where we came from and where we’re going.
    • I enjoy any of the Harry Bosch detective books in the series authored by Michael Connelly.  “A Darkness More Than Night,” described “A strange constricting feeling filled his gut. He didn’t believe in coincidences… (It) was a coincidence that even a believer in coincidence would have a difficult time accepting.”So much for detectives, tying up loose ends, relying on their hunches and reordering data, information and witness first hand accounts. 
    • Or, in “Black Box,” Connelly’s latest Harry Bosch adventure he writes, “But Bosch stayed positive.  He’d gotten lucky with Pistol Pete and the serial number.  There was no reason to think it wouldn’t hold.”  Of course, Harry had a run in with his newer Lieutenant a page or two later … “So much for his luck holding… he felt that more than his luck suddenly ebbing away.  His momentum and positive attitude were eroding. It suddenly felt like it was getting dark out.”

Image Credit: Wikimedia Commons

Inspired by: Holiday Mathis – Creators Syndicate

CENTER FOR KNOWLEDGE CREATION AND INNOVATION

The Knowledge Path | Know Laboratories | Knowledge Banking | Knowledge ATMs | Western Skies and Island Currents | Best West Road Trips

S4 E27 — Who Cares If It’s The Right Thing To Do Anymore?

They promoted the Pence Card as a contingency similar to the 1960 presidential election, in which two slates of electors were prepared pending results of a late recount of ballots in Hawaii

“5”  Steve Carell, 57; Steve Martin, 74; Steve Wozniak, 69: “To believe in your ability to sense what the right thing to do is and trust yourself to act accordingly promotes confidence in who you are now. For even more confidence, extend the same courtesy backward to Past You. No regrets.” Leo

Hi and welcome to Saturday’s 27th Episode in Season 4 of  Our Disruptively Resilient Year” on this 16th day of April in the spring of 2022.

We concluded the three-year examination of how bits of wisdom changed — during the “normal” pre-pandemic year compared to the pandemic year, and more recently to the paradoxically normal year. 

“The Tau of Steves: What You Don’t Know Could Fill a Book”

Table of Contents

Season Four continues now within domestic and global chaos.

Previously in Season Four, The Disruptively Resilient Year

S4 E26What Happens If No One Asks a Question?; S4 E25Accountability?S4 E24Another Spooky Role to Play on the Outside

Related from Season Three, the Paradoxically Normal Year

S3 E27What the World Needs Now Before It’s Too Late; S3 E26Following Alice Down the Rabbit Hole; S3 E25 Art Lives Upon Discussion, Upon Experiment, Upon Curiosity …; S3 E24Reunion on the Edge of the Pacific Ocean near Legoland? Hell Yeah! 

Related from Season Two, the Pandemic Year

S2 E27Why I Have to Keep Leo da V on a Leash and So Should You; S2 E26Rethinking the N-Word ; S2 E25Are You an Innie or Outie Thinker?; S2 E24Working Remote from KnowWhere Atoll;

Related from Season One, the Normal Year

S1 E27Day 27 of My 1-Year Experiment; S1 E26Day 26  of My 1-Year Experiment; S1 E25Day 25 of My 1-Year Experiment; S1 E24Day 24 of My 1-Year Experiment

Context

If you haven’t been following along, the previous 6 episodes illustrate political turmoil in this Disruptively Resilient Year which add to our summary in S4 E18. 

Our last episode follows Trump’s announcement for the 2020 nomination after his election denying followers in the 6 battleground states lost when the red wave failed to materialize. Today we pick the continuing story with the “Pence Card”.

What started as the “Pence Card” floated as a legal theory by Ivan Raiklin in a two page proposal, then championed by National Security Adviser Michael Flynn tweeted to the former President.

Raiklin asserted then-Vice President Mike Pence had unilateral authority to reject electoral votes from states deemed to be fraudulent.

So Boris Epshteyn worked with Rudy Giuliani in December 2020 to persuade Republican officials in seven states to prepare certificates of ascertainment for slates of Trump “alternate electors” to be presented to Pence for certification. — Wikipedia

They promoted the Pence Card as a contingency similar to the 1960 presidential election, in which two slates of electors were prepared pending results of a late recount of ballots in Hawaii, according to Wikipedia sources. 

Both parties agreed to that recount, which ultimately resulted in John F. Kennedy winning the state, though the outcome of the election did not hinge on the Hawaii results. By contrast, in the case of the 2020 election, the stated need for slates of alternate electors in multiple states was predicated on persistent false claims of nationwide election fraud.  — Wikipedia

The Epshteyn Show

Epshteyn asserted the slates of alternate electors were not fraudulent and “it is not against the law, it is according to the law.”

In on the ruse, dozens of Republican legislators from Arizona, Georgia, Michigan, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin wrote Pence on January 5. 

All Pence had to do like the loyal former Vice President he had done many times in the past was to delay the January 6 certification for ten days.

When he did, those 5 key states would have time to replace the elector slates. 

Pence did not act on the request and that day also rejected a proposal made by Eastman:

That a vice president could simply choose to reject the electoral college results; a vice president’s role in certifying the results is constitutionally ministerial. — Wikipedia

Command Center

The Washington Post reported on October 23, 2021 that the Willard Hotel, was a “command center” for a White House plot to overturn the results of the 2020 election.

Epshteyn told The Washington Post in October 2021 

That he continued to believe Pence “had the constitutional power to send the issue back to the states for 10 days to investigate the widespread fraud and report back well in advance of Inauguration Day, January 20th.”

Epshteyn was subpoenaed in January 2022 to testify before the House Select Committee on the January 6 Attack, according to Wikipedia

Pence didn’t fall for the “Pence Card”  

But it was in that context, that during the January 5 meeting at the Willard Hotel, Eastmen laid out the details in his January 4 memo describing his theory that Vice President Mike Pence could refuse to certify certain state elector slates the following day, and hand Trump a second term instead.

Actually, there were two memos.  The infamous six-step plan and a second, a more extensive plan, with multiple scenarios for Pence to take to overturn Biden’s election according to Wikipedia:

    • The first memo described the constitutional and statutory process for opening and counting of electoral votes under the 12th Amendment and Electoral Count Act, alleging that the Electoral Count Act was unconstitutional. 
    • The memo further claimed that the Vice President, who also serves as President of the Senate and presides over the joint session of Congress, “does the counting, including the resolution of disputed electoral votes… and all the Members of Congress can do is watch.” 
    • The memo refers to the actions of John Adams and Thomas Jefferson during the presidential elections of 1796 and 1800 as evidence for this claim; some supporters of President Trump, such as Congressman Louie Gohmert, had falsely claimed that Jefferson’s counting of Georgia’s electoral votes in 1800 indicated that the Vice President could unilaterally accept or reject electoral votes.
    • The memo then laid out a six-step plan for Pence to overturn Biden’s election

Behind Memo Number Two

The second memo laid out a more extensive plan with multiple scenarios for Pence to take to overturn Biden’s election: 

    • The first section outlined fictional illegal conduct by election officials in six states (Arizona, Georgia, Michigan, Nevada, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin). 
    • The second section again alleged that the Electoral Count Act was unconstitutional, and that Pence had the power to unilaterally accept or reject electoral votes. 
    • The third section referred to “7 states” and outlined various alternatives for Pence to take to overturn Biden’s election.
    • Slates of electors declaring Trump the winner actually were submitted from the seven states, but the National Archives did not accept the unsanctioned documents and they did not explicitly enter the deliberations.
  • If all went according to Eastman’s plan, Pence would have declared Trump the winner.  He would have won more Electoral College votes after the seven states were thrown out, 232 votes to 222.

Evidence

“3” Steve Zahn, 51: “We want what seems somewhat, but not entirely inaccessible. Complete inaccessibility inspires derision. Desire will be ignited where beauty meets the unfinished or unpolished. Rawness makes a thing accessible.” Scorpio

Can I be honest?  I just don’t know how to interpret this observation.  But, somehow I like it.

Random ones that make me want change my sign.

Today’s Holiday Birthday: 

You’ll experience many environments and get the best of every world. Chaotic challenges shape you; calm, supportive places allow for intensive, focused work. You are brilliant without trying to be or do anything other than what comes naturally. Someone will travel far to see you — the ultimate compliment.

Really?  Can’t wait!

“4”  Steve McQueen (1930 – 1980): “Life is bustling and you’ll do what you can. As for the rest, instead of saying “I don’t have time,” try more empowering language like, “this is not my priority right now” and feel like an absolute boss.”Aries

This is not my priority right now.  

“4”  Steve Howey, 42: “You’ve a talent for understanding just how much you can and should take on. It’s natural to want to distance yourself from a harsh reality or distract yourself from pain.” Cancer

Haha.  A life lesson I learned the hard way.  I never could estimate just how much time it would take to achieve a goal for a client in my consulting practice.  So crafting winning proposals was hardly my strength.  Then, you’re stuck with a contract that pulls more time and energy out of you than is necessary.  

“5”  Steve Carell, 57; Steve Martin, 74; Steve Wozniak, 69: “To believe in your ability to sense what the right thing to do is and trust yourself to act accordingly promotes confidence in who you are now. For even more confidence, extend the same courtesy backward to Past You. No regrets.” Leo

Wow, this like a novel took an unexpected twist at the end.  I felt I’d apply it to how Emma the Baroness and I roll our eyes at what isn’t right, but has been going on for Three Seasons now on the national scene.  But instead it’s a reminder to identify those hard won lessons from the past and not make it so hard on myself.  Here’s to the next manuscript!

“3”  Steve Greene, 34; Steve Guttenberg, 61; Stephen King, 72: “As you make more of a distinction between what you have to do and what you choose to do, you understand that the list of ‘have-to’s’ is actually quite small. You’ll examine your reasons for continuing with certain responsibilities.” Virgo

Somehow I feel cheated.  Here you started out with a great premise, and then it dissipated.  Really?  I hoped for more insight.

“5”  Steve Harvey, 62; Stephan Patis, 53;  Stephen Hawking (1943 – 2018): “Even though a job is nearly complete, the refinements take almost as much time as the job itself did. Tending to details is hard work, but also very worth the effort.” Capricorn

See, this is what I had hoped for on a day like today.

Holiday Theme for The Day: 

Albert Camus said it’s necessary to fall in love, “if only to provide an alibi for all the random despair you are going to feel anyway.” Can you think of times when you felt a certain way first and looked for reasons later? … The opposite directive — claim hope and watch it blossom in your life.

What’s Going On

Literally Bottled and Set Adrift from KnowWhere Atoll

    • @KnowLabs suite of 36 digital magazines, according to my analytics, grew from 12559 this week to 12654 organically grown followers.
    • Orange County Beach Towns 216 viewers stopped by the week before.

Foresight

Quality-of-Life

Long-Form

    • “Here, Right Matters: An American Story” by Alexander Vindman. “We’d long been confused by the president’s policy of accommodation and appeasement of Russia, the United States’ most pressing major adversary. Russia’s president Vladimir Putin invaded Ukraine, seizing the Crimean Peninsula, attacking its industrial heartland, the Donbass, from the capital, Kyiv. By 2019, little had changed, Russian military and security forces and their proxy separatists continued to occupy the Donbass. The biggest change was to Ukraine’s importance as a bulwark against Russian aggression weeks earlier, the White House had abruptly put a hold on nearly four hundred million dollars.” 
    • David Enrich begins his book with a suicide in “Deutsche Bank Dark Towers: Deutsche Bank, Donald Trump, and an Epic Trail of Destruction” and then meticulously details the bank’s Russian money laundering operations. Deutsche’s Russian business surged after revenues had fallen 50% due to the 2008 financial crisis. Putin’s Russia, poured in to Deutsche from deals it did with VTB Bank, linked to the Kremlin’s intelligence apparatus. Deutsche positioned itself as a crucial cog in “The Laundromat” by doing what couldn’t be done — processing cross-border transactions for banks that were too small  and didn’t have offices outside their home countries.
    • “Unthinkable: Trauma, Truth, and the Trials of American Democracy” by Jamie Raskin recalls one tragedy no parent should endure — the suicide of his son — and then a second tragedy at almost the same time — the insurrection on January 6th 2021, that terrified he and his congressional peers who were tasked by the Constitution to routinely oversee the orderly transfer of power from one former president to the duly elected new President. 
    • “A Warning” by Anonymous (Miles Taylor) written prior to the January 6th Insurrection as an insider’s account documenting how frequently the former President’s behavior and rage without any “guard rails” showed just how far he would go to win the next election at any cost while spinning lies and misinformation on top of each other.  
    • “Peril” by Bob Woodward and Robert Costa provides anecdotes, stories and inside reporting documenting the controversial last days of Donald Trump’s presidency, as well as the presidential transition and early presidency of Joe Biden. 
    • “Devil’s Bargain: Steve Bannon, Donald Trump, and the Nationalist Uprising,” by Joshua Green tracks the money behind the scenes leading up to the 2016 presidential election and the growing influence of Steve Bannon’s network of extreme nationalists.

Image Credit: Wikimedia Commons

Inspired by Holiday Mathis – Creators Syndicate

CENTER FOR KNOWLEDGE CREATION AND INNOVATION

The Knowledge Path | Know Laboratories | Knowledge Banking | Knowledge ATMs | Western Skies and Island Currents | Best West Road Trip

S3 E35 — This Ain’t No Zemblanity

What about luck? An “architecture of serendipity” provides exposure to new ideas, people, and ways of life so crucial to you, because it expands your horizons.  And, when you boiled away all the jargon, this was at the heart of my new knowledge creation and innovation services.

“5”  Steve McQueen (1930 – 1980): The first idea that comes to you may indeed be the best one, but come up with more anyway, if only for the accompanying thrill of heading into unexplored directions.” Aries

Hi and welcome to Sunday’s Episode 35 in Season 3 of  My Paradoxically Normal Year” on this 25th day of April in the spring of 2021 — which is a three-year examination of how bits of wisdom changed during the “normal” pre-pandemic year and then in the pandemic year, and now months after.

The Tau of Steves: What You Don’t Know Could Fill a Book

Table of Contents

Previously from Season Three, the Paradoxically Normal Year

S3 E34Why You’re Susceptible to Subliminal Suggestions Like …; S3 E33Do Meaningful Coincidences Really Exist?; S3 E32But, Why Should You Care?

Related from Season Two, The Pandemic Year

S2 E35Was this Pandemic Year a 1-Off or New Way of Life?; S2 E34Why Is This Kicking Off the 4th Industrial Revolution?; S2 E33What Happens When Your Business Collapses?; S2 E32Trapped and Bored? Or Unleashing a Reinvention Wave?

Related from Season One, The Normal Year

S1 E35Day 35 of My 1-Year Experiment ; S1 E34Day 34 of My 1-Year Experiment; S1 E33Day 33 of My 1-Year Experiment; S1 E32Day 32 of My 1-Year Experiment

Context

In the Report’s Conclusion Section of The One-Year Natural Experiment we’ve covered meaningful coincidences and synchronicity, now it’s about their second cousin,  serendipity or happy accidents as in unplanned, but fortunate discoveries.

What about luck? Let’s skip “zemblanity” coined by William Boyd — you know, “If it weren’t for bad luck I’d have no luck at all.”

In my career workshops I emphasized the path to higher paying and more enjoyable positions was paved with preparation — identifying what you did well, was valued by decision-makers facing challenges you could capitalize,  who commanded the budget needed to engage your services and in which types of or phase of growth would value your skills and abilities the most.  

That’s the preparation part of organizing you luck.  

Over the years I was able to predict with almost with 90% accuracy when a person would luck into the job of their dreams if they interviewed almost anyone informally, described which challenges a client or employer faced (that you met before), asked for three referrals to other people and broadcast to your audience in a similar matter. 

And, then out of the blue one of your connections hosts you and your future client or boss at a lunch, you loosely propose what you do and one thing leads to another and boom you’ve been hired.

In my other career, advising innovation teams and product development teams I introduced a variety of tools to increase serendipity into decision making, problem solving and creative endeavors.

Innovations made by chance have gained purchase throughout the history of product invention and scientific discovery. 

Most everyday products had serendipitous roots (Post-Its, Silly Putty, microwave, velcro, popsicle and even penicillin) with many early ones related to animals or imitations of nature.

Serendipity has potential application in the design of social media, information searches, and web browsing.

In some Paradoxy-Moron organizations serendipity factors into potential design principles for online activities capturing a wide array of information and viewpoints, rather than just re-enforcing a researcher’s opinion.

 An “architecture of serendipity” provides exposure to new ideas, people, and ways of life so crucial to you, because it expands your horizons.  And, when you boiled away all the jargon, this was at the heart of my new knowledge creation and innovation services.

Now in this passion project of living life like an art form in a natural experiment, each day’s Holiday Tau triggered lucky new insights and fresher perspectives.

Evidence

While Zahnny, the Fonz, Emma the Baroness and I inherited a sucky Holiday Tau today, the outlook for next week had our names all over it.

Random ones that make me want change my sign.

Wait, what a coincidence, throw in a smidge of serendipity and we’ll be on to something, Steve

“5”  Steve McQueen (1930 – 1980): The first idea that comes to you may indeed be the best one, but come up with more anyway, if only for the accompanying thrill of heading into unexplored directions.” Aries 

Hi Howey, I’m already a believer in your Holiday Tau.  It’s already 2:46 p.m. and I’m still banging away on this document.  Did somebody say squirrel?  Time break this composition off and step outside!

“4”  Steve Howey, 42:The most productive day involves stints of concentrated effort followed by breaks in the fresh air. To skip the breaks makes the journey much less enjoyable, and longer, too.” Cancer

As an introvert, I’m already tuned into my supply of emotional energy almost like a battery knowing when I need some time to myself to plug back in to the source.

“5”  Steve Carell, 57; Steve Martin, 74; Steve Wozniak, 69: “While emotional energy, like love, may be invisible, to your eye, it animates the physical world quite obviously. You will easily tell how people are feeling, especially when they are trying to hide those feelings.” Leo

So, let’s piggy-back on the Holiday Tau of the inventor and his two comedian partners in Tau.

“5”  Steve Greene, 34; Steve Guttenberg, 61:Daydreaming is anything but a waste of time, though don’t expect concrete ideas to come from it now. Today’s flights of fancy open up the borders for later breakthroughs.” Virgo

Will somebody throw a little serendipity my way?  I’m well overdue.

“4”  Steve Nash, 45:You’ve a quirky style and a worldview that could be described as ‘singular.’ You’re unintentionally entertaining, and this works in your favor. Once disarmed, people are so amenable to your suggestions!”Aquarius

Normally, Steve I love your TauBits of Wisdom, but not so much today.

“3”  Steve Jobs, (1955 – 2011): “You don’t fear the influence of others. You know who you are. It is because your rules for yourself are so firm that you can afford to have an open mind.” Pisces

Holiday Forecast for the Week Ahead: 

“This…will not disappoint by ramping up the tension. Besides the domain of life, death and transformation, seduction, with a penchant for using shadows and fog to enhance the allure of our fascinations. Some will be drawn to build temptations, and others will be called to fall prey to them. An early theme of this transit is: what a little power can do. It changes people. Some would say it corrupts them. … will recall to us the times we’ve used and abused power, and the times we were victimized by forces more powerful than us. The lessons of these happenings aren’t learned all at once. They soak in over time. Just when we think we’ve gotten all we can from a past lesson, … will show us a new level of meaning we hadn’t been aware of before.”

What’s Going On

Literally Bottled and Set Adrift from KnowWhere Atoll 

    • @KnowLabs suite of digital magazines jumps from 8003 to 8068 organically grown followers

Foresight

Quality-of-Life 

Long-Form

    • “Consilience: The Unity of Knowledge” by E.O. Wilson, an entomologist who studied colonies of ants for their insights.  But didn’t stop there, according to The Wall Street Journal, “A dazzling journey across the sciences and humanities in search of deep laws to unite them.”
    • “True Believers,” the novel by Kurt Andersen (which seems to precede Fantasyland)? I like how he goes back and forth from now to the ‘60s in which the main character is writing a memoir, but needs “Okays” from her friends who had been hiding a secret for 40+ years that could ruin their careers?  Like, what’s my equivalent
    • “Disappearing Through the Skylight” by O.B. Hardison, Jr. which proceeded “Consilience” by a decade.  Hardison’s been described as a polymathic renaissance man who wrote, “… Nature has slipped, perhaps finally beyond our field of vision.”  What does it mean for “… science, history, art and architecture, music, language, ultimately, for humanity”? This one provides missing chunks of understanding where we came from and where we’re going.
    • I enjoy any of the Harry Bosch detective books in the series authored by Michael Connelly.  “A Darkness More Than Night,” described “A strange constricting feeling filled his gut. He didn’t believe in coincidences… (It) was a coincidence that even a believer in coincidence would have a difficult time accepting.”So much for detectives, tying up loose ends, relying on their hunches and reordering data, information and witness first hand accounts.

Image Credit: Wikimedia Commons

Inspired by: Holiday Mathis – Creators Syndicate

CENTER FOR KNOWLEDGE CREATION AND INNOVATION

The Knowledge Path | Know Laboratories | Knowledge Banking | Knowledge ATMs | Western Skies and Island Currents | Best West Road Trips

S3 E34 — Why You’re Susceptible to Subliminal Suggestions Like …

What about synchronicity and meaningful coincidences? Haha.  That was a test.  We covered it on Friday as a discussion section of Conclusions in The One-Year Natural Experiment Report.

“5”  Steve Howey, 42:Try not to get hung up on having a final, polished result because your time is better spent solving a number of problems, which you’ll never get to if you try to make any of them perfect.” Cancer

Hi and welcome to Saturday’s Episode 34 in Season 3 of  My Paradoxically Normal Year” on this 24th day of April in the spring of 2021 — which is a three-year examination of how bits of wisdom changed during the “normal” pre-pandemic year and then in the pandemic year, and now months after.

The Tau of Steves: What You Don’t Know Could Fill a Book

Table of Contents

Previously from Season Three, the Paradoxically Normal Year

S3 E33Do Meaningful Coincidences Really Exist?; S3 E32But, Why Should You Care?; S3 E31Treat It Like a Pawn Ticket to Sketchier Things

Related from Season Two, The Pandemic Year

S2 E34Why Is This Kicking Off the 4th Industrial Revolution?; S2 E33What Happens When Your Business Collapses?; S2 E32Trapped and Bored? Or Unleashing a Reinvention Wave?; S2 E31Getting Charged from Box Automattic-aly

Related from Season One, The Normal Year

S1 E34Day 34 of My 1-Year Experiment; S1 E33Day 33 of My 1-Year Experiment; S1 E32Day 32 of My 1-Year Experiment; S1 E31Day 31 of My 1-Year Experiment

Context

Oh, except this passage about coincidences from President Obama’s recent memoir, “A Promised Land” when he recounts his nomination at the party’s convention: 

“ … formally making the motion to vote me in as the Democratic nominee, the full meaning of my nomination hit me. By coincidence, it was the forty-fifth anniversary of the March on Washington and Dr. King’s historic ‘I Have a Dream’ at National Mall on that day in 1963: ‘We cannot walk alone. And as we walk, we must make the pledge that we shall always march ahead. We cannot turn back.’”

What’s the purpose of the report you ask?  

To explain the gap between the subliminal seduction of horoscopes across the chasm to the “land of people with hardened filters” so entrenched they only see what they believe and consciously or unconsciously disregard the rest.   

Is there any hope for a path to bridge two polarized political extremes as Americans? Which sets up a deeper dive into the “Magical Thinking Tour” to unfold later.

Each morning, usually at 5:30 or 6 am, I do two things that activate my conscious and unconscious filters. One for selecting horoscopes and my second daily project, for screening lists of headline stories from each Apple News sources.  

How long it takes to select a flip-worthy story.   

Reminds me of how I remember my Masters thesis advisor saying he didn’t understand my research but gave me an “A.”  

I got to use a camera to record the scan path — where a person looked as I presented images a little faster each time and had them decide if it was the same or different image.  

I got to see if there was any connection between the speed of recognition of an image held in short-term memory and a similar eyeball pattern of search to find distinguishing features based on which to name the object.  

My one take away was at speeds when college freshmen couldn’t tell you what they saw, they could still recognize it. 

So, stuff comes in and we can’t see it, but we can react to it.

Which leads to a moment maybe three years earlier when I knew in my heart of hearts that law school wasn’t for me and returning to psychology was.  

Our professor using that annoying Socratic teaching method to sharpen our budding legal minds and kept on it and on it challenging everybody’s timid answer to why a holding in a legal case made good law.  

I hated it.  I read and reread case material I didn’t understand as homework. I lived by myself in a studio apartment on the more dangerous, but more affordable student side of the university town.  

But the professor in his mid-forties with dark hair and wire rim glasses drove home the point — a turning point for me — about the reliability of witnesses.  

When you and your girlfriend exit a movie theatre with another couple and one of you tries to fill the silence by asking, ‘So what did think about the movie?’ what do you say?  Do you list the plot structure attributes or how stunning the actress or handsome the leading actor was, or the music score, or …?  No, you answer you liked it or didn’t first.  And, then you list all the reasons why.

The second part becomes a position you discuss or defend with your friends over drinks.  

I realized I was much more interested in that sequence than imagining some future court room scene where I tried to trip up a witness on the stand into revealing there was a possibility she was wrong.

I wanted to know why someone did what they did.  Why your “lizard brain” has already decided and your logical brain explains your lizard’s choice after the fact.

Evidence

So Lizard, how did I do?

Random ones that make me want change my sign.

Am I?  No, not really.  As much as I love your duet, I’m not lifting your Holiday Tau today.  Sorry.

“2”  Steve Smith, 30, Stevie Nicks, 72: “You’re torn about whether to invest in a new tool. Definitely, using something different will amplify your capacities. Don’t rule out that which you make yourself. Tools of your very own will open up fresh avenues of exploration.” Gemini

Can I apply your Holiday Tau to writing the Report about My 1-year Experiment, and composing the second year — the pandemic experiment, and of course this year — the post-pandemic year (I hope) and the comparison of three years in April?  

“5”  Steve Howey, 42:Try not to get hung up on having a final, polished result because your time is better spent solving a number of problems, which you’ll never get to if you try to make any of them perfect.” Cancer

G&G, your TauBit of Wisdom tantalizes me today.  I forced myself to publish the first 9 days of My 1-Year Experiment in an evolving format. I forgot some of the editing and media limitations and the rules I followed before, which slowed me down at first, but maybe I should look forward to surpassing previous limits, eh?

“4”  Steve Greene, 34; Steve Guttenberg, 61:If you keep the same rules, you’ll get the same shaped result. You’re going for something else. Your process is evolving. Take away one of your rules to let it expand unimpeded by previous limits.” Virgo

Thanks for the afternoon off, today Steve.  You Holiday Tau’s permission reminded me of a cartoon I saw of a teacher in a class room calling on a kid who raised his hand.  Yes Billy she asked and he said, “May I be excused my brain is too full?”

“4”  Steve Harvey, 62: “Mindfulness gets plenty of play in your world lately — so much so that one might forget about the utter joys of the opposite state. Mindlessness certainly has its merits, especially in the sunshine of spring!  Capricorn

What’s Going On

Literally Bottled and Set Adrift from KnowWhere Atoll 

    • @KnowLabs suite of digital magazines jumps from 8003 to 8068 organically grown followers

Foresight

Quality-of-Life 

Long-Form

    • “Consilience: The Unity of Knowledge” by E.O. Wilson, an entomologist who studied colonies of ants for their insights.  But didn’t stop there, according to The Wall Street Journal, “A dazzling journey across the sciences and humanities in search of deep laws to unite them.” 
    • “True Believers,” the novel by Kurt Andersen (which seems to precede Fantasyland)? I like how he goes back and forth from now to the ‘60s in which the main character is writing a memoir, but needs “Okays” from her friends who had been hiding a secret for 40+ years that could ruin their careers?  Like, what’s my equivalent
    • “Disappearing Through the Skylight” by O.B. Hardison, Jr. which proceeded “Consilience” by a decade.  Hardison’s been described as a polymathic renaissance man who wrote, “… Nature has slipped, perhaps finally beyond our field of vision.”  What does it mean for “… science, history, art and architecture, music, language, ultimately, for humanity”? This one provides missing chunks of understanding where we came from and where we’re going.

Image Credit: Wikimedia Commons

Inspired by: Holiday Mathis – Creators Syndicate

CENTER FOR KNOWLEDGE CREATION AND INNOVATION

The Knowledge Path | Know Laboratories | Knowledge Banking | Knowledge ATMs | Western Skies and Island Currents | Best West Road Trips

S3 E33 — Do Meaningful Coincidences Really Exist?

I’ve always been intrigued by Carl Jung’s synchronicity theory — meaningful coincidences — which “holds that events are ‘meaningful coincidences’ if they occur with no causal relationship yet seem to be meaningfully related.”

The Tau of Steves: What You Don’t Know Could Fill a Book

“5”  Steve McQueen (1930 – 1980): You don’t set out to be original, but you’re working with something other than what was available in the example. Using different ingredients and techniques yields unique results.” Aries

Hi and welcome to Friday’s Episode 33 in Season 3 of  My Paradoxically Normal Year” on this 23rd day of April in the spring of 2021 — which is a three-year examination of how bits of wisdom changed during the “normal” pre-pandemic year and then in the pandemic year, and now months after.

The Tau of Steves: What You Don’t Know Could Fill a Book

Table of Contents

Previously from Season Three, the Paradoxically Normal Year

S3 E32But, Why Should You Care?; S3 E31Treat It Like a Pawn Ticket to Sketchier Things; S3 E30Steal These TauBits, Please. It’s Only Fair!

Related from Season Two, The Pandemic Year

S2 E33What Happens When Your Business Collapses?; S2 E32Trapped and Bored? Or Unleashing a Reinvention Wave?; S2 E31Getting Charged from Box Automattic-aly; S2 E30It’s Crazy. Why does Amazon Prime Work, but Netflix Doesn’t?

Related from Season One, The Normal Year

S1 E33Day 33 of My 1-Year Experiment; S1 E32Day 32 of My 1-Year Experiment; S1 E31Day 31 of My 1-Year Experiment; S1 E30Day 30 of My 1-Year Experiment

Context

Last time, you’ll recall, writing the Conclusion to my Report I drew inferences from my favorite mode of being — one that correlates well with my practice of lifting TauBits (TauLifts), selecting Holiday Tau and promoting TauBits of Wisdom — intuition.

Intuition is the subtle knowing without ever having any idea why you know it, more like a direct perception of truth, fact, who a person really is, how a situation will play out, what the future has in store for us.

Drawing on intuition, I’m now focusing on synchronicity and meaningful coincidences. 

Last night, by coincidence I tripped across a passage in Robert Parker’s “The Devil Wins” I read in my Kindle when Jesse Stone, Police Chief in Paradise says, 

I don’t believe in coincidences.” 

In various books, Harry Bosch in Michael Connelly’s series who worked in the LAPD robbery and homicide department (as did Stone), in “A Darkness More Than Night,” described: 

A strange constricting feeling filled his gut. He didn’t believe in coincidences… (It) was a coincidence that even a believer in coincidence would have a difficult time accepting.

So much for fictionalized police chiefs and detectives, tying up loose ends, relying on their hunches and reordering data, information and witness first hand accounts.

I’ve always been intrigued by Carl Jung’s synchronicity theory — meaningful coincidences — which “holds that events are ‘meaningful coincidences’ if they occur with no causal relationship yet seem to be meaningfully related.” 

According to Wikipedia:

“… skeptics (e.g. most psychologists) tend to dismiss the psychological experience of coincidences as just yet one more demonstration of how irrational people can be. Irrationality in this context means an association between the experience of coincidences and biased cognition in terms of poor probabilistic reasoning and a propensity for paranormal beliefs.”

So, while Stone and Bosch are both fictional, they aren’t irrational, biased, reasoning-challenged with a fondness for UFOs. 

But Wikipedia also included:

A survey (with 226 respondents) of the frequency of synchronicity in clinical settings found that: 

    • 44% of therapists reported synchronicity experiences in the therapeutic setting; and 
    • 67% felt that synchronicity experiences could be useful for therapy”
    • “… psychologists were significantly more likely than both counsellors and psychotherapists to agree that chance coincidence was an explanation for synchronicity, whereas, counsellors and psychotherapists were significantly more likely than psychologists to agree that a need for unconscious material to be expressed could be an explanation for synchronicity experiences in the clinical setting

And as a psychologist in training at the Masters level after my tour of duty in Vietnam what actually intrigued me was what this survey represented to me — clinical psychology as an art form but with a practical natural experiment attempt.

Synchronicity appeared in clinical settings as reported by 4 in 10 therapists and two-thirds felt as a tool synchronicity experiences could prove beneficial for therapeutic outcomes.

What now caught my eye was the which came first, the chicken or the egg implications.  Was it that chance coincidences explain synchronicity?  Or, encouraging the expression of unconscious material explained synchronicity events in clinical settings?

Sigmund Freud and Jung were pioneers in “Talking Therapy” though Jung was younger and at one point Freud felt he would take the mantle from Freud later in life.  

However Jung in 1916 published the English version as of his paper Psychology of the Unconscious making it clear that his views were taking a direction quite different from those of Freud. 

To distinguish his system from psychoanalysis, Jung called it analytical psychology.

Fast forward to the Consciousness Revolution of the 1960s and 1970s.  

For a period of time, largely in the 1970s meaningful coincidences manifested themselves in Lawrence Blair’s “Aquarian Science” as some sort of grand “consilience” big enough to include astrology and astronomy, mysticism and possibly anticipated string theory in theoretical physics.

Whereas our outer, rational memories show us only brief span on the surface of history behind us, our inner memories — through myth and symbol — detect currents of meaning beneath the future as well.”

“The outer chaos and confusion of our time is but the disturbance which characterizes the metamorphosis of all great rhythms, or aeon’s, into a new one; but inwardly, the iron-filings of a special kind of related knowledge are already polarizing themselves around a new pattern of Meaning, revealing that a deeper knowledge of universal laws is contingent on a deeper knowledge of the self, and the schism between the two wolds of science and religion is beginning to heal and to merge into a single majestic river of vision. 

 “Rhythms of Vision: The Changing Patterns of Belief” by Lawrence Blair, Ph.D.  published in 1975.

Evidence

What about today’s Holiday Tau, TauBits of Wisdom and the need for TauLifts? Synchronicity anyone?  Any meaningful coincidences?  How about a glimpse of a “majestic river of vision?”

Are we to interpret your TauBit of Wisdom as admonition to turn off conscious processing in favor of unconsciousness chewing?

“3”   Steve Zahn, 51: “Can there be peace without understanding? Of course! Sometimes peace is accepting what is, whether or not you get it. Consider giving up the need to process every bit of information, at least right now.” Scorpio

Random ones that make me want change my sign.

True enough, Steve I don’t.  I’m improvising a newer recipe.

“5”  Steve McQueen (1930 – 1980): You don’t set out to be original, but you’re working with something other than what was available in the example. Using different ingredients and techniques yields unique results.” Aries

So this was supposed to be a pain-free day for me.  Think again.  It takes a day to recover from my physical therapy sessions and my knee and hip are still sore.  Maybe, tomorrow?  

“3”  Steve Carell, 57; Steve Martin, 74; Steve Wozniak, 69: “People run, but really there’s no way to avoid it. Pain is as entwined with existence as is breathing. Accepting this inevitability makes pain-free times, such as you’ll have today, all the sweeter. You’ll live on wings of exuberance.” Leo

So G&G, where were you when the country could have used your Holiday Tau as advice for the previous administration.  Seems like that’s all they did.  Blame and name and avoid fixing or improving things other than a chance for reelection.

“5”  Steve Greene, 34; Steve Guttenberg, 61:The thing about blame is that it’s only one of many ways to package an outcome, and today it’s an entirely unnecessary one at that. Forget about blame. There is only what happened, and various ways for it to not happen again.” Virgo

I’m sure Steve this Holiday Tau, maybe not for you then, but for one of the Steves months ago, triggered my revelation that my greatest fear was public speaking.  Thinking back on it, it may have delayed my career transition from advisor to trainer and workshop leader.  Finding how to make it work for you is the Tau of Tau.

“5”  Steve Aoki, 41: “There are many ineffective ways to handle fear, which include ignoring it, running from it, pretending to be cool about it or letting it stop you. The proper way is to accept fear so you can harness it and make it work for you.” Sagittarius

You had me at “wildly divergent problems,” Steve.  The more interdependence and related parts, the better.  Give me chaos and complexity any time as long as you pay my fee.

“5”  Steve Nash, 45:It’s amazing what you can solve when you put your mind to it. Don’t even think about backing down from the wildly divergent problems because they will be the stage from which you shine brightest.” Aquarius

What’s Going On

Literally Bottled and Set Adrift from KnowWhere Atoll 

    • @KnowLabs suite of digital magazines jumps from 8003 to 8068 organically grown followers

Foresight

Quality-of-Life 

Long-Form

    • “Consilience: The Unity of Knowledge” by E.O. Wilson, an entomologist who studied colonies of ants for their insights.  But didn’t stop there, according to The Wall Street Journal, “A dazzling journey across the sciences and humanities in search of deep laws to unite them.” 
    • “True Believers,” the novel by Kurt Andersen (which seems to precede Fantasyland)? I like how he goes back and forth from now to the ‘60s in which the main character is writing a memoir, but needs “Okays” from her friends who had been hiding a secret for 40+ years that could ruin their careers?  Like, what’s my equivalent
    • “Disappearing Through the Skylight” by O.B. Hardison, Jr. which proceeded “Consilience” by a decade.  Hardison’s been described as a polymathic renaissance man who wrote, “… Nature has slipped, perhaps finally beyond our field of vision.”  What does it mean for “… science, history, art and architecture, music, language, ultimately, for humanity”? This one provides missing chunks of understanding where we came from and where we’re going.

Image Credit: Wikimedia Commons

Inspired by: Holiday Mathis – Creators Syndicate

CENTER FOR KNOWLEDGE CREATION AND INNOVATION

The Knowledge Path | Know Laboratories | Knowledge Banking | Knowledge ATMs | Western Skies and Island Currents | Best West Road Trips

S3 E32 — But, Why Should You Care?

If you know your MBTI type already — one of 16 — as my Executive MBA students do, then you translate it into my Talent Profile System — one of 16 — so can choose the best and worst places to work for you, including growth or decline stages, when new offers come rolling in.

“5”  Steve Aoki, 41: “You will take chances and perform experiments, each risk teaching you, among other things, how to access your intuition in the pursuit of meaningful results.” Sagittarius

Hi and welcome to Thursday’s Episode 32 in Season 3 of  My Paradoxically Normal Year” on this 22nd day of April in the spring of 2021 — which is a three-year examination of how bits of wisdom changed during the “normal” pre-pandemic year and then in the pandemic year, and now months after.

The Tau of Steves: What You Don’t Know Could Fill a Book

Table of Contents

Previously from Season Three, the Paradoxically Normal Year

S3 E31Treat It Like a Pawn Ticket to Sketchier Things; S3 E30Steal These TauBits, Please. It’s Only Fair!; S3 E29Why 83.3% of the Time I Swiped Your Tau

Related from Season Two, The Pandemic Year

S2 E32Trapped and Bored? Or Unleashing a Reinvention Wave?; S2 E31Getting Charged from Box Automattic-aly; S2 E30It’s Crazy. Why does Amazon Prime Work, but Netflix Doesn’t?; S2 E29Three Months That Changed the World

Related from Season One, The Normal Year

S1 E32Day 32 of My 1-Year Experiment; S1 E31Day 31 of My 1-Year Experiment; S1 E30Day 30 of My 1-Year Experiment; S1 E29Day 29 of My 1-Year Experiment

Context

I’m still working my way through the Conclusions Section of the 1-year Natural Experiment Report.  Not quite awake, I found myself swimming in introversion, thinkers, INTP and idea packaging.

But, mostly intuition, the “N-word” in INTP, not to be confused with the “I-word” meaning introverted.

What I’d been writing about was how well my idea packaging description (113 SPIP) syncs with my Myers-Briggs Temperament, INTP.  

But, why should you care? 

If you know your MBTI type already — one of 16 — as my Executive MBA students do, then you translate it into my Talent Profile system — one of 16 — so can choose the best and worst places to work for you, including growth or decline stages, when new offers come rolling in.

The MBTI is the theory of psychological type originally developed by Carl Jung and “operationalized” by two Americans, a mother and daughter, Katharine Cook Briggs and Isabel Briggs Myers.

A quick Google search about my psychological type finds:

The INTP type describes a person who is energized by (spending) time alone (Introverted), who focuses on ideas and concepts rather than facts and details (iNtuitive), who makes decisions based on logic and reason (Thinking) and who prefers to be spontaneous and flexible rather than planned and organized (Perceiving).

Add to Google a quick Wikipedia inquiry and you find more about “P”.

Sensing and intuition are the information-gathering (perceiving) functions. Those who prefer intuition tend to trust information that is less dependent upon the senses, that can be associated with other information (either remembered or discovered by seeking a wider context or pattern). They may be more interested in future possibilities. For them, the meaning is in the underlying theory and principles which are manifested in the data.”

For most of my last career, I realized intuition and the process of visualizing something in advisory sessions helped me gain a perspective or framework for offering recommendations and original connections. 

Further, except for the I or the E, the NTP mirrored each other as did the other sets of 8 combinations I identified yesterday. 

According to a dictionary thinkers conceive, imagine, fancy, realize, envisage, envision or mean to form an idea. Somehow an idea enters your mind “… with or without deliberate consideration or reflection.” 

Ideas stimulate or challenge your intellect or mind.  If you’re thinking you have an idea, belief, or thought about something.

But, intuition I believe is more influential.

The two, thinking and intuition, combine for me when I hear enough in a 1-hour advisory session or in a Starbucks conversation over coffee or breakfast (remember those) to trigger a thought-video which frames my response and quickly captures a solution to a problem they bring.  

Or, how in sitting and reflecting on trends and combinations until, like during this rain storm, a picture emerges and triggers an “aha” moment. 

In other circumstances my brain unconsciously keeps chewing on the noise, data, information, knowledge and wisdom I’ve been exposed to — thinking — for a long time until the insight arrives.

Intuition is the ability to acquire knowledge from direct access without the need for conscious reasoning, likely from an instinctive feeling. 

You know, like in those detective books, TV shows and the Harry Bosch Amazon Prime series — hunches and assumptions formed on the basis of past experience and cumulative knowledge. 

Intuitive hunches arrive wholly formed and quickly, without conscious awareness of the underlying mental process of information. 

Intuition is the subtle knowing without ever having any idea why you know it, more like a direct perception of truth, fact, who a person really is, how a situation will play out, what the future has in store for us.

Evidence

If all that, then you probably wouldn’t be wrong by stating the obvious I probably can’t say why I select or confirm my early morning choices of Holiday Tau.  Or that I’m disappointed that the TauBit of Wisdom sucked for Zahnny, the Fonz, Emma the Baroness and me today.

Oh well, it’s on to a life of petty larceny.

Random ones that make me want change my sign.

Oh, great.  Just great.  Here I lay out my case for a correlation between intuition and TauBits of Wisdom and you two go all counter-intuitive on me.  Haha, now I’m second guessing why I chose your Holiday Tau.  Seriously, though this is restating if you want something done quickly give it to a busy person.

“4”  Steve Smith, 30, Stevie Nicks, 72: “It doesn’t seem like it would be so, but having less time to work on a project will lead to more creative results. The crunch will focus you on what matters and you’ll be smart about how you use your minutes.” Gemini

G&G I have to thank you for your Holiday Tau.  In the last two days I published four articles on my site, Knowledge ATMs, about the first 5 days of my 1-year experiment.  Now if I can juggle everything else, I should be able to pump out one or two a day consistently.

“5”  Steve Greene, 34; Steve Guttenberg, 61:Your working habits didn’t really need to improve, and yet they will as you make a practice of keeping up a certain pace. You are becoming more confident in your capacity to turn out results in any given timeframe.” Virgo

So coach, this reminds me of one of my clinical psychology professors who told his class about which theory he follows when working with patients — Freud, Jung, B.F. Skinner?  His was a practical answer.  They all work and none of them work, it depends upon the patient.  

“5”  Steve Kerr, 54: You’re so productive now because you’re using everything you feel to fuel your endeavors — the good, the bad. There’s nothing that can’t be used here, so just throw it all into the engine.” Libra

And, so there it is.  Thanks Steve for your Holiday Tau.  You’ve rolled everything into one — experiments, intuition and meaningful results.

“5”  Steve Aoki, 41: “You will take chances and perform experiments, each risk teaching you, among other things, how to access your intuition in the pursuit of meaningful results.” Sagittarius

What’s Going On

Literally Bottled and Set Adrift from KnowWhere Atoll 

    • @KnowLabs suite of digital magazines jumps from 8003 to 8068 organically grown followers

Foresight

Quality-of-Life 

Long-Form

    • “Consilience: The Unity of Knowledge” by E.O. Wilson, an entomologist who studied colonies of ants for their insights.  But didn’t stop there, according to The Wall Street Journal, “A dazzling journey across the sciences and humanities in search of deep laws to unite them.” 
    • “True Believers,” the novel by Kurt Andersen (which seems to precede Fantasyland)? I like how he goes back and forth from now to the ‘60s in which the main character is writing a memoir, but needs “Okays” from her friends who had been hiding a secret for 40+ years that could ruin their careers?  Like, what’s my equivalent?
    • “Disappearing Through the Skylight” by O.B. Hardison, Jr. which proceeded “Consilience” by a decade.  Hardison’s been described as a polymathic renaissance man who wrote, “… Nature has slipped, perhaps finally beyond our field of vision.”  What does it mean for “… science, history, art and architecture, music, language, ultimately, for humanity”? This one provides missing chunks of understanding where we came from and where we’re going.

Image Credit: Wikimedia Commons

Inspired by: Holiday Mathis – Creators Syndicate

CENTER FOR KNOWLEDGE CREATION AND INNOVATION

The Knowledge Path | Know Laboratories | Knowledge Banking | Knowledge ATMs | Western Skies and Island Currents | Best West Road Trips

S2 E60 — She Began to Weep…

Curiosity drives discoveries in science and innovation.  It pushes knowledge forward.  But, predictability and certainty favor the status quo and our homeostasis because without them our mind grinds to a halt. So what can you do?

“5”  Steve Howey, 42:When the solution eludes you, tackle it backward, inside out or upside down — any other way than the usual. What’s needed is a fresh approach.” Cancer

Hi and welcome to Sunday’s Episode 60 in Season 2 of  “My Pandemic Year Natural Experiment” on this 7th day of June in the summer of 2020.  

“The Tau of Steves: What You Don’t Know Could Fill a Book”

Table of Contents

Season One and Two are a two-year examination of how bits of wisdom changed during the “normal” pre-pandemic and then in this unfolding pandemic year.

Previously in Season Two, the Pandemic Year

S2 E59See What You’ve Been Missing; S2 E58Check Back in 18 Months; S2 E57Science and Medicine or Politically-Motivated Misinformation? 

Related from Season One, the Normal Year

S1 E60Overlapping Cycles of Life; S1 E59Where Did All the Dillon Millennials Go? Eureka!; S1 E58Judging a Stroll from the Hotel Santa Barbara to the Lobero Theater; S1 E57More or Less in the Know

Context

So, if you’re an introvert like me, then you understand how the forced solitude brought on by this Pandemic gives me the wonderful opportunity to work on my neglected manuscript I’ve been calling “Volume Three — a Legacy.”

Here’s an excerpt from the first draft or Chapter One .

AJ noticed him heading her way. “How’d you sleep?” she asked sitting in the kitchen as the sun rose in the East chasing the last moments of gray away.  Except for the gray she felt in her chest.

“OK, I guess, well no not really.  It’s just so weird sleeping in my old room.” Shaggy replied as he walked on the still shiny dark brown laminated wooden floor from the living room and past the long teak table in the dining room where all the family gatherings took place — Thanksgiving, especially Christmas Eve and Christmas Day — into the glaring California illuminated morning light.

“Coffee’s ready,” she said.

“Oh, OK, great.” Shaggy mumbled. He rubbed his tired eyes and turned left into the white u-shaped kitchen with white cabinets surrounding stainless steel dishwasher, stove, microwave and refrigerator.

Following his nose sniffing out the early morning fragrance just past the refrigerator on his right he mumbled something that AJ couldn’t hear as she sat in “his seat” with her back to the ever brightening morning streaming in through the sliding glass door.

“You wanna sit here?”

He opened the only unattached white cabinet on the opposite wall which hung above the light gray backsplash next to the white bay window behind the sink and next to the kitchen table.  He grabbed a dark blue mug, spun and headed back to the coffee maker.

“No, thanks.  I’m gonna just sit on the couch for a minute or two and sip this Folgers.”

Timing was off.

AJ landed at John Wayne Airport in Orange County, California from her home with Darin in Winter Park, Florida in Orange County where it is normally three hours later on any day of the week, especially on this one.  

The one she hadn’t been looking forward to.

Which is why she was up first.  Why she had tossed and turned in the other guest bedroom at the top of the stairs. Why she laid awake with a deeply sad feeling beginning three hours earlier at 3:30 am PST.

Shaggy walked past the blonde oblong wooden kitchen table to AJ’s left to the first of two matching couches that separated the kitchen from the family room in one big room.  

He could see himself in the mirror display on the opposite wall as he padded the few steps deeper into the room and stopped turned left and found his spot on the first couch facing the second butted up to the light gray painted wall and the mirror displays.

The smaller mirrors distorted his image.  

And being 6’ 4” and under these circumstances this morning the distorted reflection mirrored his internal morning fog.

AJ rose from the kitchen table deciding to join him instead of talking to his back.  She slid down the small space between Shaggy’s couch and the fireplace next to the patio door walked 6 or 7 steps on gray tile hearth into the family room and maneuvered herself carefully around the round dark wood coffee table that now separated her and Shaggy.

Her view back into the kitchen would be the money shot if she and Shaggy decided to put the place on the market.  To her left the original white cabinet doors along the floor hid blankets for winter viewing of the big black screen TV from each couch when the California temperature dropped into the 50s.  Brrr. Except for anybody else not living in Florida or California.

They hid board games from childhood and all kinds of things that would eventually require sorting and boxing, not something she was prepared to entertain at this moment.

And the original bookshelves displayed pictures of the two blond brothers, Shaggy and Jazzy, AJ’s photoshoot near high school graduation.  And, books and plates and CDs, and a wine rack and more pictures and photo albums and ….

“Remember when Jazzy was a baby and you could hold him in the crook of your arm between you hand and elbow?” she asked out of the blue.

“No, not really. I was only four when he was born at Hoag Hospital, but I do remember you visiting every summer,” Shaggy said. 

To AJ’s right on the end table next to the wicker basket on the floor for collecting “The Los Angeles Times” newspaper Jazzy loved to use for starting a fire was a photo showing AJ in a white wedding gown smiling and a slice of a backdrop from the Outer Banks hotel where she and Darin tied the knot and Shaggy celebrated with a canoe filled with beer followed by his gigantic migraine dwarfing hangover the next morning — actually afternoon.

“I remember the back yard before they changed it.  It didn’t have the tan slope stone walls, but I think the black wrought iron railing stretched across the back from side to side.  And there used to be giant ficus trees in corners and a small round cement patio surrounded in grass,” she told Shaggy.

“Yeah,” he said.

That’s where they tossed a whiffle ball and played catch until probably Shaggy began hitting the ball with the big red plastic bat over the fence and down into the slope on purpose.  

“Somewhere there’s a picture of all of us in front of the tree on the grass around here I bet,” she said. “And probably that one where we four kids posed in front of the then white front door on the red brick entrance.”

“I remember when our parents threw that karaoke party when Jazzy graduated high school and I graduated college and you and Darin flew out for the Mexican foot catering affair.”

“That’s the one where Darin tipped over the container of margarita salt on the grass which killed it in no short order, right?  Dad never let him forget.  He once wrote on a birthday card that to commemorate the occasion they had a brass metal plate made up engraved with the date and his name and …” she began to weep.

Evidence

Random ones that make me want change my sign.

Today’s Holiday Birthday:  

You’ll be called on to do something you haven’t done before. You’ll be both inspired and inspirational. A group will form around your leadership as you apply past experience to figure things out. Results beyond your expectations will come at the start of the new year. Your family grows in March 2021.

OK, let’s check back in 9 months!

“5”  Steve McQueen (1930 – 1980): “It only takes one connection to make your personal life go from being a stale routine to an inspired journey. You’ll make that connection today and a transformation will occur in the weeks to come.” Aries  

So you’re saying this connection is an antidote for pandemic cabin fever?  That transformation … will it come from a person kind of connection or from a answer that has eluded my pursuit?

“4”  Steve Smith, 30: You’ll be gifted with an emotion that is one click beyond passion and desire: rage. Rage doesn’t have to be angry or negative, but it’s always powerful, and best focused on what’s important to you.” Gemini

OK, this TauBit of Wisdom scares me and intrigues me.  How do you focus it without doing irreparable damage?

“5”  Steve Howey, 42:When the solution eludes you, tackle it backward, inside out or upside down — any other way than the usual. What’s needed is a fresh approach.” Cancer

Thanks for breaking the log jam.  I just couldn’t figure out how to start this manuscript.

“4”  Steve Carrell, 57; Steve Martin, 74; Steve Wozniak, 69: Whomever you align yourself with, you grow to be more like. It isn’t necessary for you to have a personal relationship with your role models. You get to choose them from the whole wide world.” Leo

There’s such a long list, but one of the most influential is Toffler (see immediately below) and more recently Kurt Andersen who wrote “Fantasyland” which is both an update and a framework in which to view Future Shock.

“4”  Steve Greene, 34; Steve Guttenberg, 61; Stephen King, 72:Your famous adaptability will kick in. From the outside, your behavior may look illogical, but there’s definitely a method to your madness. When an unusual situation crops up, an unusual reaction is warranted.” Virgo

Should this be true about me, I feel the need to honor Alvin Toffler who alerted me to disruption and how to adapt or accommodate changes on the horizon.

“4”  Steve Aoki, 41: Passions build slowly. At first, you don’t even realize what you want. When leanings turn to yearnings and become undeniable in their message, it’s a blessing that doesn’t feel like one.” Sagittarius

Who can resist such a phrase, “learnings turn to yearnings”?  But the point of the message mystifies me, why doesn’t the blessing feel like one?  It’s still early in the day, so maybe it will be revealed in the evening or late afternoon.

“5”  Steve Nash, 45:Emotional skill and intelligence can be earned through both negative and positive experiences. Today will bring scenarios you will use as examples of what to do and what not to do.”  Aquarius

Well, of course I’d rate this TauBit of Wisdom a “5” given what it looks like we’re being trapped in for the foreseeable future. So take some time to review the Deloitte and Salesforce sponsored scenarios. 

“3”  Steve Jobs, (1955 – 2011): The possessions that you get the most value out of are the ones you use every week and maybe every day. As for the others, the more you can let go of, the lighter you’ll feel.” Pisces

So that would be describing the 500 pieces jigsaw puzzle sitting for days now on our dining room table?

Holiday Forecast for the Week Ahead:  

Curiosity is a slightly uncomfortable state of mind, as it relies on the tension between knowing and not knowing. The tension is resolved with an answer. So tenacious is our need for answers that our brains will just fill in the blanks with anything that enables us to push forward. 

The human brain craves certainty. 

Without it, we are paralyzed. Certainty facilitates action, commitment and movement. Where there is no certainty (and reality offers very little of it) humans do the next best thing; we make a good guess and come up with a theory that will allow us to go onward. If to assume is human, then not to assume is superhuman. Anyone can say, “I’m right,” and live to defend that. But it takes humility, higher thinking and a willingness to be uncomfortable inside the tension of curiosity to go to the next cognitive level — to question, wonder, revel in mystery and leave the loop open to possibility.

Whether or not today’s forecast gains currency over the next 7 days, I believe the insights ring true for me — curiosity drives discoveries in science and innovation.  It pushes knowledge forward.  But, predictability and certainty favor the status quo and our homeostasis because without them our mind grinds to a halt.  Without answers we jump to guesses and theories and conspiracy theories, unless you are the rare person who focuses the unresolved tension onto the next higher cognitive level.  

What’s Going On

Literally Bottled and Set Adrift from KnowWhere Atoll 

    • @knowlabs followers of one or more of my 35 digital magazines organically grew from 3634 to 3806.

Foresight

Quality-of-Life 

Long-Form

    • Saw the movie, didn’t realize that one of my favorite authors, Michael Connelly — his detective Hieronymus (Harry) Bosch book series and Amazon Prime series — also wrote, “The Lincoln Lawyer” which I just finished. Gotta tell you I can’t not see his lead character (Mickey Haller, Bosch’s half brother) as anyone else but Matthew McConaughey. 

Image Credit: Wikimedia Commons

Inspired by: Holiday Mathis – Creators Syndicate

CENTER FOR KNOWLEDGE CREATION AND INNOVATION

The Knowledge Path | Know Laboratories | Knowledge Banking | Knowledge ATMs | Western Skies and Island Currents | Best West Road Trip

S3 E31 —Treat It Like a Pawn Ticket to Sketchier Things

Yesterday was all about me — what and why my Holiday Tau fit me the most.  Today is filled with a disappointing gaggle of Holiday Taus for Steves.  

“2”  Steve Zahn, 51: “It’s happened before that you got what you wanted and then were somehow vaguely unsatisfied. This time, you’ll question your wants and get to the bottom of why you want it, which helps your chances of a fortifying outcome.” Scorpio

Hi and welcome to Saturday’s Episode 30 in Season 3 of  My Paradoxically Normal Year” on this 18th day of April in the spring of 2021 — which is a three-year examination of how bits of wisdom changed during the “normal” pre-pandemic year and then in the pandemic year, and now months after.

The Tau of Steves: What You Don’t Know Could Fill a Book

Table of Contents

Previously from Season Three, the Paradoxically Normal Year

S3 E30Steal These TauBits, Please. It’s Only Fair!; S3 E29Why 83.3% of the Time I Swiped Your Tau; S3 E28Why I Stole Your Daily Horoscope for a Year

Related from Season Two, The Pandemic Year

S2 E31Getting Charged from Box Automattic-aly; S2 E30It’s Crazy. Why does Amazon Prime Work, but Netflix Doesn’t?; S2 E29Three Months That Changed the World; S2 E28Hosting Norwegian Zooms While Trump Eliminated the Virus in April

Related from Season One, The Normal Year

S1 E31Day 31 of My 1-Year Experiment; S1 E30Day 30 of My 1-Year Experiment; S1 E29Day 29 of My 1-Year Experiment; S1 E28Day 28 of My 1-Year Experiment 

Context

I’d been working on the Findings Section of the report describing how for a year I lived life like an art form in a natural experiment.

The “Conclusions Section” grabbed my attention because the Holiday Tau for Zahnny, the Fonze, Emma the Baroness and me illustrates what critics level against astrology, palm reading, fortune telling and taking horoscopes too seriously. 

How could you not follow Nancy’s lead?  Not “Do It,” or, “Just Say No.” 

But first, here’s a quick and dirty 30-day summary, “Why I Stole Your Sign and the Mysteries of Your Life”.  Treat it like a pawn ticket to sketchy things I’ve learned from stealing your sign without doing the time. I feel so guilty about it that I’m willing to sell it back to you.  

When Ronald Regan sat in the oval office, his First Lady consulted with an astrologer for scheduling his important meetings.  Was this time optimum for the President?  Or was tomorrow better?  

“Mrs. Reagan’s spokesperson said of the astrologer,  ‘Air Force One didn’t take off without permission. [Nancy] set the time for summit meetings with Mikhail Gorbachev, presidential debates with Carter and Mondale…the timing of all the President’s trips abroad, of his press conferences, his State of the Union addresses.’”

I can only assume it included leading up to his speech, “Mr. Gorbachev, take down that wall.” 

After all, they were both in the acting business as celebrities before he became California’s governor and later President.

Let’s not forget what a fellow Californian and Los Angeles Lakers legend wrote:

“Intelligent imagination is vital to this sort of deduction! However improbable a hypothesis, it cannot be discarded”

 “Mycroft and Sherlock” by Kareem Abdul-Jabbar.

However comma in the Conclusions Section is the time to confirm or deny your hypothesis.  Can I get an “Amen”?  

The reason why astrology may seem like it works is because our brains are wired to look for patterns, even when none exists.  For me as a writer I found it easy to conduct “discussions” with Steves about their horoscope.  

And, that made it easy for me to bring small parts of what I’m actually thinking about, working through, or experiencing in the world like they are. 

I embarked on this experiment, and I make no apologies for it, hoping I’d find a significant inspiration or insight to solve a vexing problem, master a complicated first time challenge or just make how my day flowed a little easier.

But you can’t ignore the role of bias conspiring against reliable results: selection bias on the front end and confirmation bias on the back end. 

Self-selection bias boils down to the very human tendency to look for interpretations or confirmations for what we already hope to be true. 

To mitigate undue bias effects, I summarized what was happening behind the scenes first and then “scored” the Holiday Tau curated for that day.

Since the brain is not looking for exact matches, it can pick up some characteristics of a match and assume it fits. Astrology is no more than a test of chance and it is not a reliable way to predict personality, scientists and critics say.

Another phenomenon I noticed over the year is one astrologer’s prediction for a horoscope is typically and completely unrelated to the prediction of another astrologer for the identical horoscope. 

Oops.  

So for purposes of this natural experiment I chose consistency and stuck with Holiday Mathis throughout the year.  Your mileage may vary.

But, I had to ask and am left with, how similar is my long-term attraction to trends and predictions I research to better decide a significant course of action with the appeal of the shorter-term astrological forecasts? 

I’m attracted for entertainment purposes, yes, but, as for guidance, not much at all.  To which you can rightly point out you’ve continued this obsession into your third year! 

Guilty as charged. On top of stealing your birthday more often than not.

And, that takes us to an example of what a Wikipedia “expert” had to say about how some people become truer believers than others:

“However, many people still believe their horoscope perfectly aligns with the events in their lives. There are some possible explanations for this. Horoscopes have vague wording and are based on typical everyday activities.”

Evidence

Cases in point.

“2”  Steve Zahn, 51: “It’s happened before that you got what you wanted and then were somehow vaguely unsatisfied. This time, you’ll question your wants and get to the bottom of why you want it, which helps your chances of a fortifying outcome.” Scorpio

Random ones that make me want change my sign.

And for some reason the rest of the Holiday Tau doesn’t get much better!

“3”  Steve Greene, 34; Steve Guttenberg, 61:When they come to you with questions you can answer, it feels good to be able to help. When they come to you with questions you can’t answer, it gives you ideas about what to learn next.” Virgo

“3”  Steve Kerr, 54: You’re just following your curiosity and doing your job, but you end up growing your expertise in the process, and your influence naturally expands. With increasing power comes increasing responsibility.” Libra

“4”  Steve Aoki, 41: “Intentionally focus on what there is to be happy about. To appreciate and enjoy where you’re at is more than just a good practice; it’s a tool that keeps you connected to the best parts of your humanity.” Sagittarius

What’s Going On

Literally Bottled and Set Adrift from KnowWhere Atoll 

    • @KnowLabs suite of digital magazines jumps from 7981 to 8003 organically grown followers

Foresight

Quality-of-Life 

Long-Form

    • “Consilience: The Unity of Knowledge” by E.O. Wilson, an entomologist who studied colonies of ants for their insights.  But didn’t stop there, according to The Wall Street Journal, “A dazzling journey across the sciences and humanities in search of deep laws to unite them.” 
    • “True Believers,” the novel by Kurt Andersen (which seems to precede Fantasyland)? I like how he goes back and forth from now to the ‘60s in which the main character is writing a memoir, but needs “Okays” from her friends who had been hiding a secret for 40+ years that could ruin their careers?  Like, what’s my equivalent
    • “Disappearing Through the Skylight” by O.B. Hardison, Jr. which proceeded “Consilience” by a decade.  Hardison’s been described as a polymathic renaissance man who wrote, “… Nature has slipped, perhaps finally beyond our field of vision.”  What does it mean for “… science, history, art and architecture, music, language, ultimately, for humanity”? This one provides missing chunks of understanding where we came from and where we’re going.

Image Credit: Wikimedia Commons

Inspired by: Holiday Mathis – Creators Syndicate

CENTER FOR KNOWLEDGE CREATION AND INNOVATION

The Knowledge Path | Know Laboratories | Knowledge Banking | Knowledge ATMs | Western Skies and Island Currents | Best West Road Trips

S2 E57 — Science and Medicine or Politically-Motivated Misinformation?

The Good Company embraces their corporate responsibility by focusing on their long-term enlightened self-interest with investments in their employees and in the communities where they live and work.

“5”  Steve Zahn, 51: “You know the sensation you get when you look back on old photos and realize that a lot of your concerns back then were needless? Be happy now. Cast worry aside. Trust time. It will handle so much for you.” Scorpio

Hi and welcome to Thursday’s Episode 57 in Season 2 of  “My Pandemic Year Natural Experiment” on this 4th day of June in the summer of 2020.  

The Tau of Steves: What You Don’t Know Could Fill a Book

Table of Contents

Season One and Two are a two-year examination of how bits of wisdom changed during the “normal” pre-pandemic and then in this unfolding pandemic year.

Previously in Season Two, the Pandemic Year

S2 E56What Iffing; S2 E55Dreaming of 30 Tempting Getaways; S2 E5490 Days to Future-Proof Your Career Trajectory and Lifetime Investments 

Related from Season One, the Normal Year

S1 E5712 Hidden Secrets and Stolen Wisdom – Month Two; S1 E56It’s Frickin’ Summer and So Are You; S1 E55All Roads Lead to the Future; S1 E54A Version That’s a TauBit Grander

Context

How will our pandemic lives play out?  Back to our continuing my series drawing upon the report from Deloitte and Salesforce’s “The world remade by COVID-19 Scenarios for resilient leaders | 3-5 years.” 

We’re at step four. Assemble the alternatives for each force into internally consistent stories.

Previously we revealed the summary of “The Passing Storm” for which the scenario story tellers assume governments communicate the severity of the pandemic and gets us citizens to take the crisis seriously and go along with the quarantine program.  

The good news in this scenario is that the virus’s spread is contained.  

    • No second wave materializes. 
    • Immunization works leading to prevention.  
    • The economy, while taking a hit initially rebounds near the end of 2020 and builds once we consumers feel more confident sometime after July 2021.

Today, before visiting each of the four alternatives in greater detail, we profile Scenario Two.

Good Company

The COVID-19 pandemic persists past initial projections, placing a growing burden on governments around the world that struggle to handle the crisis alone. 

A surge of public-private sector partnerships emerges as companies step up as part of the global solution. 

New “pop-up ecosystems” arise as companies across industries partner to respond to critical needs and drive much-needed innovation. 

Social media companies, platform companies, and tech giants gain new prestige. 

Ultimately, companies shift further toward “stakeholder capitalism,” with a more empathetic stance on to how they can best serve their customers, shareholders, and employees to rebuild after the crisis.

In another positive alternative, we’ll witness the initiative taken by those companies to supply healthcare expertise especially with software and tools.  

The Good Company embraces their corporate responsibility by focusing on their long-term enlightened self-interest with investments in their employees and in the communities where they live and work. 

Best estimate for the economic cycles? 

Recovery begins near the end of the year in 2021, but slows during the first 6 months of 2022, before accelerating in the second half.

Evidence

“5”  Steve Zahn, 51: “You know the sensation you get when you look back on old photos and realize that a lot of your concerns back then were needless? Be happy now. Cast worry aside. Trust time. It will handle so much for you.” Scorpio

So, you’re saying they same holds true for Emma the Baroness and me in, say 2022 or 2024?  I can verify I have experienced the sensations even more recently looking back on old photos in-between searching for missing jigsaw pieces and binge watching Netflix.

Random ones that make me want change my sign.

Today’s Holiday Birthday:  

“This year turns up your vitality; lifestyle changes and exciting projects figure in. People you admire find their way into your world. You already have what others need, and you’ll find the niche that allows you to feel a deep sense of contribution and belonging, not to mention the chance to get exactly what you want.

So, clearly this ain’t my birthday, but if it is yours please feel free to soak up the optimism.  And, let’s celebrate you by fervently wishing that key elements of “The Passing Storm” and “The Good Company” influence our futures together.

“4”  Steve Carrell, 57; Steve Martin, 74; Steve Wozniak, 69: You’ll revel in your freedom. Being left alone to live as you like without being nagged, judged or subjected to the whims of authority is the perk of adulthood you cherish.” Leo

Haha.  Welcome relief for an introvert. Solitude.  Ah yes.  Even more so now with no one to see and nowhere to go. 

“4”  Steve Kerr, 54:You become like the people around you and this is why you’re pretty choosy about whom you allow to the inner circle, or, for that matter, any concentric circle of which you are the center.” Libra

It’s pretty easy for Emma the Baroness and me.  Are you a believer in science and medicine or politically-motivated misinformation?

“3”  Steve Aoki, 41: Your cosmic gift of the day is a clear demarcation on the point of diminishing returns. This prevents you from unnecessary work and frees you to focus on what matters most to you.” Sagittarius

I picked this TauBit maybe out of wishful thinking more than anything else — I mean, c’mon, my cosmic gift?  Most excellent.

“4”  Steve Harvey, 62:Judges get paid to judge. Why should those who aren’t judges do this for free? You refuse to concern yourself with matters that do not directly concern you. It takes less energy to live and let live.” Capricorn 

Yeah, sure.  But I see it in even more simple terms — introverts need to budget their energy.  We take longer to recharge.  Which, in turn, takes away from more imaginative work and creativity.

What’s Going On

Literally Bottled and Set Adrift from KnowWhere Atoll 

    • @knowlabs followers of one or more of my 35 digital magazines organically grew from 3188 to 3698.

Foresight

Quality-of-Life 

Long-Form

    • Saw the movie, didn’t realize that one of my favorite authors, Michael Connelly — his detective Hieronymus (Harry) Bosch book series and Amazon Prime series — also wrote, “The Lincoln Lawyer” which I just finished. Gotta tell you I can’t not see his lead character (Mickey Haller, Bosch’s half brother) as anyone else but Matthew McConaughey. 

Image Credit: Wikimedia Commons

Inspired by: Holiday Mathis – Creators Syndicate

CENTER FOR KNOWLEDGE CREATION AND INNOVATION

The Knowledge Path | Know Laboratories | Knowledge Banking | Knowledge ATMs | Western Skies and Island Currents | Best West Road Trip

S3 E30 — Steal These TauBits, Please. It’s Only Fair!

No jealousy allowed.  Yesterday I confessed to swiping all the Holiday Tau I wanted. Why? I was only receiving  17%  of the total available Tau on any given day. So I was envious of the other 83%. 

“5”  Steve Zahn, 51: “While many scan the conversation for arguing points to dig into, you have better luck listening up for possible common interests. Bonus: Trying to see another person’s point of view is just good practice.” Scorpio

Hi and welcome to Saturday’s Episode 30 in Season 3 of  My Paradoxically Normal Year” on this 17th day of April in the spring of 2021 — which is a three-year examination of how bits of wisdom changed during the “normal” pre-pandemic year and then in the pandemic year, and now months after.

The Tau of Steves: What You Don’t Know Could Fill a Book

Table of Contents

Previously from Season Three, the Paradoxically Normal Year

S3 E29Why 83.3% of the Time I Swiped Your Tau; S3 E28Why I Stole Your Daily Horoscope for a Year; S3 E27What the World Needs Now Before It’s Too Late; S3 E26Following Alice Down the Rabbit Hole

Related from Season Two, The Pandemic Year

S2 E30It’s Crazy. Why does Amazon Prime Work, but Netflix Doesn’t?; S2 E29Three Months That Changed the World; S2 E28Hosting Norwegian Zooms While Trump Eliminated the Virus in April; S2 E27Why I Have to Keep Leo da V on a Leash and So Should You

Related from Season One, The Normal Year

S1 E30Day 30 of My 1-Year Experiment; S1 E29Day 29 of My 1-Year Experiment; S1 E28Day 28 of My 1-Year Experiment; S1 E27Day 27 of My 1-Year Experiment 

Context

But, today I’m adding more to the Findings Section of the 1-year Natural Experiment’s Report.  These TauBits of Wisdom describe me well.  I can legitimately claim them (as can Emma the Baroness).

Scorpios (Oct. 24 – Nov. 21) Steve Zahn, Henry Winkler

Best Fit For Me

Work Organizations and Cultures

Your research will lead you to concepts, next steps and, most importantly, people who can help you take them.

Why did I pick it? 

If I’m true to myself (INTP / Idea Packager) and work on all of the Volume Two, Three, and Tau manuscripts at the same time,  I feel what I write about is truthful and useful and original.  And, by publishing to Patreon I can write freely and link to something else I wrote on my website and in my blogs. For instance I can work in the story about constant commoditization, how artistic work drives audiences to social media in a siren server kind of way.  And if that, then it means artists receive pennies on the dollar in royalties while the platforms thrive and grow in value.

Knowing about new possibilities gives you more choices.  You could attain the perfect coach or mentor or, at the very least, find the book you need.

Why did I pick it?  

Here’s what I’ve learned.  Listening to almost everyone else’s advice works for extroverts based on how their brains are wired — as I learned from “The Introvert Advantage: How Quiet People Can Thrive in an Extrovert World.” To just pick one passion project at a time, focus on it and complete it works for them.  But,  as an introverted INTP life story writer and idea packager,  my strength is associative or lateral thinking.  I know it is also my weakness in the extreme, so the best I can do is treat my passion projects as category buckets and fill them each a little as I go.

Legacy and Wisdom

For you, intuition isn’t a part-time thing. It’s always engaged. Today it will be a significant driver for you.

Why did I pick it? 

It suggests how our brains work.  How we navigate through life weighing facts, yet making the actual decision based on the best intuition and logic.  Passing that TauBit of Wisdom on to others who are like me may find it valuable too.

Vitality follows those on the edge of the known.  Anyone doing what they know they can do is playing it too safe to feel successful.”

Why did I pick it? 

I’ve lived by the mantra in my career, “Anticipate, Innovate, Iterate and Excel” which leads to my theory about companies and organizations that practice it as a core competency — Paradoxy-Morons.  And, why I’m attracted to an organizations at the Reinvention stage of growth driven by Chief Reinvention Officers (CROs). You’ll notice  I began adding topics to the bottom of each day in the 1-year experiment that add to the amount of time to compose the day, but offer glimpses into broader possibilities: Tau, Trends (What’s Next), Short-Form (Where), Long-Form (notes from books), Progress and Procrastination, Speaking Volumes (1,2,3) and Banking and ATMs (Analytics)

Practical Projects

Your story is more interesting than you think and spaced with valuable information and inspiration.  How and when you share it will be important.

Why did I pick it? 

At first, I felt embarrassed by describing the horoscope angle, to this project, but nearing  the last 30-days I feel I’ve got some sound underpinnings in psychology and  neuroscience identifying parts, pathways and functions of the brain responsible to a large degree for reason and creativity. And if this, then that propels me into what the Volume Three’s Manuscript can become, or to an entirely other manuscript can become.

It seems like good ideas are being snatched up all around you. Actually, they were snatched up long ago and are just getting reworked. Seek anticipated inspiration.”

Why did I pick it? 

This time frame over a year is unique enough that it might attract a following, but it allows me to link to something already written in a pre-COVID world just as it is ending.  How will fortunes and forecasts change over the next year? Tying people, places, things, ideas, information and trends together in new and original ways can begin to answer the questions with new ideas. The real work of an idea packager is anticipating new and novel ideas partially hidden in patterns driven by trends or forecasts.

Evidence

“5”  Steve Zahn, 51: “While many scan the conversation for arguing points to dig into, you have better luck listening up for possible common interests. Bonus: Trying to see another person’s point of view is just good practice.” Scorpio

Today, should I pick it? 

Emma the Baroness and I are hosting longtime friends who traveled with us to Italy, but have moved twice, returned to California, but have returned to sell their house while pulling up stakes for good to live in Arizona. We disagree on their choice of watching Fox News and the perceived unfairness of business closings located next door to each other, enjoyed the other 99% of the evening catching up. 

Random ones that make me want change my sign.

Hi Steve. It’s easy for me to agree with your Holiday Tau today and I’ll include it in my bucket for Legacy (Volume Three Manuscript).

“5”  Steve Jobs, (1955 – 2011): “There is no how-to manual for what you are trying to accomplish today. The most important thing is that you know what you’d like your desired outcome to be. Send that star to the high heaven to guide the journey.” Pisces

Thanks, Harv.  I feel your TauBit of wisdom echos the first description of me listed under Practical Projects.

“5”  Steve Harvey, 62: “There’s so much you know that people will want to learn from you, but this is going to happen over a long period of time. You’re wise to be a little mysterious and give out one nugget of wisdom at a time.” Capricorn

What’s Going On

Literally Bottled and Set Adrift from KnowWhere Atoll 

    • @KnowLabs suite of digital magazines jumps from 7930 to 7981 organically grown followers

Foresight

Quality-of-Life 

Long-Form

    • “Consilience: The Unity of Knowledge” by E.O. Wilson, an entomologist who studied colonies of ants for their insights.  But didn’t stop there, according to The Wall Street Journal, “A dazzling journey across the sciences and humanities in search of deep laws to unite them.” 
    • “True Believers,” the novel by Kurt Andersen (which seems to precede Fantasyland)? I like how he goes back and forth from now to the ‘60s in which the main character is writing a memoir, but needs “Okays” from her friends who had been hiding a secret for 40+ years that could ruin their careers?  Like, what’s my equivalent
    • “Disappearing Through the Skylight” by O.B. Hardison, Jr. which proceeded “Consilience” by a decade.  Hardison’s been described as a polymathic renaissance man who wrote, “… Nature has slipped, perhaps finally beyond our field of vision.”  What does it mean for “… science, history, art and architecture, music, language, ultimately, for humanity”? This one provides missing chunks of understanding where we came from and where we’re going.

Image Credit: Wikimedia Commons

Inspired by: Holiday Mathis – Creators Syndicate

CENTER FOR KNOWLEDGE CREATION AND INNOVATION

The Knowledge Path | Know Laboratories | Knowledge Banking | Knowledge ATMs | Western Skies and Island Currents | Best West Road Trips