S1 E67 — Don’t Misunderstand Me

The Tau of Steves: What You Don’t Know Could Fill a Book

Summer July 2019

Steve Winwood, 71; Stevie Wonder, 69; Stephen Colbert, 56: “When you’re not interested in what you were, travel.  You needn’t too far or be gone long to gain new appreciation of your status quo.” Taurus

We’d have to travel back in time — Day 64 — to catch a Holiday Tau break for Zahn, Winkler, Emma the Baroness and me.  So, let’s consider swiping from the rest of the Steves, shall we?

Hi and welcome to Episode 67 in our First Season on this fine July 27th.

Random ones that make me want change my sign.

Emma the Baroness and I are between trips.  Our last one to Italy ending in Rome shifted my perspective after absorbing history, civilizations, art, religion and made me consider legacies. Maybe, I’m not appreciating my status quo, but I’m diving into my life.

“5”  Steve Winwood, 71; Stevie Wonder, 69; Stephen Colbert, 56: “When you’re not interested in what you were, travel.  You needn’t too far or be gone long to gain new appreciation of your status quo.” Taurus

As I’ve done before — so I’ve set a precedent — I’m going twist Harvey’s Holiday Taubits to suit what I’ve been authoring.  Not only are words important, but a community and a neighborhood contribute to happiness.  And, here’s my twist, you can identify your next home by following 11 simple steps and by selecting from 66 kinds of neighborhoods personalized by age, stage, status and affluence and population density.

“5”  Steve Harvey, 62: “Words signal to culture, status, age and more.  You’ll note with interest the evolution of your own vocabulary.” Capricorn

Diffusion.  I like that from Nash’s Holiday Tau.  Often the membrane between my inner and outer worlds feel more like confusion until a pattern emerges.  Then I can visualize a path forward.

“4”  Steve Nash, 45: “The emotions live inside of you, the circumstances live outside, and diffusion has to happen for you to move comfortably in the outside realm.” Aquarius

So diffuse my emotions and environment with sufficient time to see clear to the right decision.  Maybe I can combine the Holiday Tau for Nash and Smith.

“4”  Steve Smith, 30: “Once you’ve made up your mind, you’ll be unstoppable.  Take your time: Deciding on the right goal is more important than what follows.” Gemini

Don’t misunderstand me.  Integrity and respect should be the top of the line.  But, for me today I have to pass on Aoki’s Holiday Tau.

“2”  Steve Aoki, 41: “As far as improvement tools go, integrity and respect are top of the line.” Sagittarius

Image Credit: Wikimedia Commons

Inspired by Holiday Mathis – Creators Syndicate

S1 E60 — Overlapping Cycles of Life

The Tau of Steves: What You Don’t Know Could Fill a Book

Summer July 2019

“5”  Steve Nash, 45: Break large tasks down into small ones and then plot them out with a reasonable schedule over time.” Aquarius

What’s been going on, besides that unwelcome headache from a holiday celebration of drinking and eating to excess egged on by the fireworks of patriotism? Following my intuition today, July 5th, on Day 60 of My 1-Year Experiment, I pulled up a pdf of “New Lenses Field Guide” and reviewed the last two topics, 

“Fit: Sweet Spot of Overlapping Life, Community, Organizational, Economic and Generational Cycles” 

Finding your sweet spot by integrating lifecycles — anyone can zero in on opportunities to do what you love in a business, social, and quality-of-life climate that you’ll thrive in. Of course, shifting economic cycles, bursting bubbles and political events help or hinder our ability to capitalize on those opportunities

“Live, Love, Work and Play in Four Wealthy Dream Communities” 

In the 16 lifestyle neighborhoods, how do you evaluate six types of real estate opportunities — when to buy, how long to hold, and when to sell? Transplant your business, practice or knowledge company after evaluating seven market cycle indicators. When you do, you can take advantage of real estate markets as they move through up, down and up cycles.

Random ones that make me want change my sign.

Of the four Holiday Taus for Steves today, Nash’s connected with me more.  Without reinventing the wheel, I had searched for my “New Lenses Field Guide” as a summary of what I’d already researched and packaged.  But, mostly as an itinerary and a way of writing about the next set of chapters.  Something more practical, I guess.

“5”  Steve Nash, 45: Break large tasks down into small ones and then plot them out with a reasonable schedule over time.” Aquarius

And maybe as a non-fiction author and idea-packager I looked for frameworks to help potential readers get the most out of my manuscript. What they want to learn, even if they didn’t realize they wanted to.

“4”  Steve Howey, 42:This isn’t a case of getting it right.  It’s a case of recognizing what it is you most want to learn.” Cancer

Normally I do differentiate, but concerning this 1-Year Experiment, I’m not so sure.

“3”  Steve McQueen (1930 – 1980):You’re careful not to make things about you that shouldn’t be.  Wisdom helps you separate your role from your true self.” Aries

OK, but like what?

“2”  Steve Smith, 30:To get satisfied when you’re not requires that you notice and allow yourself to be influenced by an entirely different set of factors.” Gemini

Image Credit: Wikimedia Commons

Inspired by Holiday Mathis – Creators Syndicate

S1 E59 — Where Did All the Dillon Millennials Go? Eureka!

The Tau of Steves: What You Don’t Know Could Fill a Book

Summer July 2019

“5”  Steve Greene, 34; Steve Guttenberg, 61: “Some things you think will be easy will take forever and what you thought was a big deal could snap together in an instant.” Libra

Happy 4th of July on Day 59 of My 1-Year Experiment. We enjoyed the fireworks show with neighbors and their friends.  The night lit up with an awesome spectacular which launched from the little league ball fields on the opposite side of Olympiad — so named for the Olympics cycling event — from the lake.  

Festivities were on my mind, believe it or not,  as I published “What Were Dillon and Keystone Resort Like Before the Great Recession?” At least the subtitle: “The Uncorked Mountain Wine Festival at Keystone, Colo features delicious wines, award winning jazz, and a juried fine art show in River Run.”

Random ones that make me want change my sign.

Let’s be honest, I’m force fitting G&G’s Holiday Tau for a humble brag sorta. I did figure it would be easy to identify who — most frequent lifestyles, that is — lived in each zip coded town I had on my bucket list.  

It wasn’t.  

My source changed hands as a business several times.  The big deal part that snapped together in a “eureka!” moment was realizing I was the only one who could tell you how many millennial lifestyle profiles used to live in Dillon, Colorado.  

How many left during the Great Recession and who replaced them.  And, if those lifestyles left, where their lifestyle showed up later in, say Lake Tahoe, California.  Not even my original source could tell you that! 

“5”  Steve Greene, 34; Steve Guttenberg, 61: “Some things you think will be easy will take forever and what you thought was a big deal could snap together in an instant.” Libra

Believe me taken together WW&C’s Holiday Tau with McQueen’s described my ups and downs.

“4”  Steve Winwood, 71; Stevie Wonder, 69; Stephen Colbert, 56: “A person has to be pretty cunning indeed to outsmart his or her own worst tricks and self-sabotaging behaviors.  Such is the mastery of living.” Taurus

I can’t lie, this one is more aspirational for me,  I’m hoping to surface my real needs for it to come true.

“3”  Steve McQueen (1930 – 1980): “Maybe the thing you’re trying to do with sheer willpower can be more easily accomplished with a better understanding of your real needs.”Aries

Thanks.  I’m sure this rings true for many, but not so much for me today.  

“2”  Steve Smith, 30: “The thing that ultimately drives change is your desire for the change.  Seeing someone who has it will be the magic motivator.” Gemini

This one seems like something I should remind myself from time to time, but not for a different celebration of fireworks.  

“2”  Steve Aoki, 41: “There are those who turn minor criticisms into major arguments and take helpful comments as personal slights.  It’s not so much an invitation to quarrel as a call for help.” Sagittarius

Image Credit: Wikimedia Commons

Inspired by Holiday Mathis – Creators Syndicate

12 Hidden Secrets and Stolen Wisdom – Month Two

The first 30-days describe figuring out rules of the road, shifting decisions with implications for the whole 1-year time frame. Here are the “Top 12 TauBit of Wisdom” for the Second 30-day period.

“Evidence” highlights what I actually did on a day that influenced a rating from 1 to 5. “Experiment Methodology” highlights decisions made along the way about what’s changed.

Top 12 TauBit of Wisdom

Legitimate Holiday TauBits of Wisdom

“5”  Steve Zahn, 51: “Time to yourself seems like an impractical indulgence, you’re happier and more loving once you’ve tended to your tranquility needs.” Scorpio

“5”  Steve Zahn, 51: “Self-doubt is the enemy of imagination.  Trust and lean further into your creativity.  Agree with and build on the goodness there.” Scorpio

 

“5”  Steve Zahn, 51: “You’ve got a secret that helps you move through events with grace: Change itself doesn’t hurt.  What hurts is our resistance to change.” Scorpio

TauBits Begged, Borrowed and Stolen from Steves

“5”  Steve Jobs, (1955 – 2011): “You’re drawn to unexplored territories today, and you’ll map out the terrain for those who come along later.” Pisces

“5”  Steve Jobs, (1955 – 2011): “Project yourself to the far future.  What you see there will help you create your best strategy.” Pisces

“5”  Steve Greene, 34; Steve Guttenberg, 61; Stephen King, 72: “If you think too far into the situation, you’re likely to get lost in details and complications, making it impossible to take a stance.” Virgo

“5”  Steve Greene, 34; Steve Guttenberg, 61: “If you can’t do anything about it, then it’s not a problem.  Rather, it’s a circumstance.  Change what you can; accept the rest.” Libra

“5”  Steve Harvey, 62: “Think of all of life as an experiment.  If this person’s not right, try that person.  Don’t take the outcome personally.” Capricorn

“5”  Steve Winwood, 71; Stevie Wonder, 69: Questions such as ‘why does this matter?’ or ‘what is important about this?’ will bring you past the symptoms and right to the root issue.” Taurus

“5”  Steve Smith, 30:If wisdom were a needle in a haystack, you’d find it.  Precious insights could come from anywhere.” Gemini

“5”  Steve McQueen (1930 – 1980): Little thoughts come and go.  Write them down; record them somehow.” Aries

“5”  Steve Nash, 45: “Imagined problems can have as much impact (if not more) as real problems can have.  The good part about imagined problems is that they can be solved the instant you see reality.” Aquarius

Funny, reviewing them now only shows how in some cases I needed to twist and stretch the TauBits to fill my need to write about what I worked on.  

On Day 60  I rediscovered succinct descriptions for the knowledge path volumes one and two!! I can include the descriptions in the beginning of “Volume Two Manuscript“.  

And, for a couple of days leading up to it the ratings four the TauBits really sucked, I’ll point out a change in “Experiment Methodology” no longer including those I didn’t curate initially and those that didn’t score a “2” or “1” for relevance.

Evidence 

Topics of the Day

  • Analytics of shared articles on LinkedIn
  • Sharing political economic news from the day
  • Feeling shock about election interference, obstruction of justice while reading Volume One and Two of the redacted Mueller Report
  • Deeper dives into the negative aspects of social media, especially Facebook and Twitter

Following my intuition today, July 5th, on Day 60 of My 1-Year Experiment, I pulled up a pdf of “New Lenses Field Guide” and reviewed the last two topics, 

Topics illustrating My Passions and Life Over the Last Few Days

What’s been going on?  I’ve been working through the missing chapters from my 5-book volume I’ve been calling “The Knowledge Path Series” and just published “High Country Cowboys and Eagles in Whitefish” in my blog, Knowledge Banking: Wealthy Choices. Healthy Lives. What was it about?  Here’s how I described it: 

With the help of our knowledge bank, you can choose for variations in your new neighborhood by:

“What does an Idea Packager do?  That’s what I’m answering in Volume Two of the Knowledge Path Series.  The first volume answers the question, “If I can live and work anywhere in the world, then which community should I choose as the best fit for my inspiration, satisfaction and happiness?” 

The second series answers the question, “If I could work for any company or type of organization either as an employee, consultant or independent contractor which type or stage of growth brings out the best and worst in me?” Given the choice, which should I pursue and which should I avoid like the plague?”

In my original field research about “work” which I tested in workshops and advising sessions with hundreds of Executive MBA students I’ve been exploring disruptive change — as driven by a specific type of organization named “Paradoxy-Morons” and at a specific stage of growth companies feel either desperate enough to enter or innovative enough to bake it into their Organizational DNA — reinvention. 

Focus on conceptualizing a second manuscript about talent cultures, profiles, organization types and stages of growth

Recalling 5-year passage of time building a climate for innovation

Steve Jobs, mostly for his brand of disruptive innovation — creating new rules for an older industry.  His Holiday Tau reminds me of a quote, I believe came from Joel Barker originally:

Mastering new rules is like trying to cross a white-water river. If you can anticipate the whirlpools and the changes in the current, if you can anticipate the landing on the other shore, you have a much better chance of getting across that river successfully.

Recalling specific challenges a downsizing crisis presented to our team of internal consultants

I rediscovered my “CareerVentures DRAFT” which encapsulated what I branded as “Secrets for turning your passions into profits. 

The world was changing dramatically.  I wanted to document it, extract lessons learned and offer the best practices to clients. 

During the six years of moonlighting — getting up every morning at 5 am and writing for two hours before working in my day job as a Senior Vice President coaching executives how to find another job in the Southern California region, I realized that journal could be used another way. 

Through sophisticated “knowledge chunking,” something I had learned as a Chief Knowledge Officer and a Chief Learning Officer, the journal emerged as one of the first ebooks. 

While researching the top 10 trends everyone should plan their career around, I fell into a venture guidance contract where I coached entrepreneurs with start up ideas and products. 

That ebook also opened the door for co-authoring “Adapt! How to Survive and Thrive in the Changing World of Work” 

And that book, opened the door for the 2-year curriculum of online tools, tips and templates for my Executive MBA clients, as I advise them to change careers, buy a business or franchise and launch a start-up, consulting or coaching practice.  

And, for the more adventurous of them, to take advantage of the Mobile Knowledge Company opportunities.

Topics Which are Really True About Me Over a Long Time

  • Writing devises like the use of Holiday Tau and asking “What Would Leo da V Do?”
  • Sampling writing styles of several authors for sentence construction growth

From the Kindle version of “The Art of Memoir” by Mary Karr. 

What appeals to me is her description of life-story writers like me:

“… a fiction writer starts with meaning and then manufactures events to represent it; a memoirist starts with events, then derives meaning from them.”

(A) memoir uses novelistic devices like cobbling together dialogue you failed to record at the time.

A fierce urge to try re-experiencing your own mind and body and throbbing heart alive inside the most vivid stories from your past is step one.

Methodology Changes 

6/6/19 

Researcher’s Note:  While curating raw TauBits of Wisdom for inclusion it dawned on me I needed to calculate the total number of possibilities for final results and comparisons. Total potential horoscopes / potential between 4536 and 4548.

6/16/19

Researchers Note: The previous day returned “5” rankings for each of the Steves curated TauBits of Wisdom.  Out of today’s three of the 6 identified scored a “3” and just as many rated a “2”.  Is there any value in including “2’s” and “1’s”?

6/22/19 

Researcher’s Note:  By this time, Day 53 of my 1-year experiment, I began saving a little time in my process of reading Holiday Mathis sayings in the print edition of The Los Angeles Times, by typing into a previously copied saying, like yesterday’s Steve Zahn.  It meant I’d have to search through a half a dozen statements.  I found by bolding the Tau, it made it easier to locate one to copy and then type over.  It wouldn’t be the last time I sought efficiencies.

Researcher’s Note:  At the end of the 30 days (Days 58 and 59) the rankings topped  under “2” again, so I decided going forward I won’t record any score under “3”.

Image Credit: Wikimedia Commons

Inspired by Holiday Mathis – Creators Syndicate

S1 E52 – Missing Chapters and Paths Not Taken

The Tau of Steves: What You Don’t Know Could Fill a Book

Summer

June 2019

“5”  Steve Jobs, (1955 – 2011): “You’re drawn to unexplored territories today, and you’ll map out the terrain for those who come along later.” Pisces

Hi and welcome to this June 21st Edition and Day 52 of My 1-Year Experiment.

What’s been going on? 

I’ve been working through the missing chapters from my 5-book volume I’ve been calling “The Knowledge Path Series” and just published “High Country Cowboys and Eagles in Whitefish” in my blog, Knowledge Banking: Wealthy Choices. Healthy Lives. What was it about?  Here’s how I described it: 

With the help of our knowledge bank, you can choose for variations in your new neighborhood by:

Does that make me a paradox grandmaster?  Maybe.  But, not for the reason implied in the second sentence.

“5”  Steve Zahn, 51: “You are the grandmaster of paradox today.  For you, doing nothing is more difficult than doing something.” Scorpio

More from what I described two months ago on Day 26th illustrating our Holiday Tau then: 

In my original field research about “work” which I tested in workshops and advising sessions with hundreds of Executive MBA students I’ve been exploring disruptive change — as driven by a specific type of organization named “Paradoxy-Morons” and at a specific stage of growth companies feel either desperate enough to enter or innovative enough to bake it into their Organizational DNA — reinvention. 

Random ones that make me want change my sign.

And the paradox continues with how I responded in Day 45 on 6/7/19: 

I developed a reverse order negotiations worksheet for those in my Executive MBA career classes.  It ends with weighing the trade-offs among three offers.  But it begins with all the other factors most candidates weigh at the last minute.

“5”  Steve McQueen (1930 – 1980): As generous as an offer may be, if it doesn’t work for you, then move along without fuss or regret.” Aries

Is Howey’s Holiday Tau messing with me?  It feels like a hall of mirrors.  Should I read less into it?

“3”  Steve Howey, 42: Yes, this looks a lot like what you’ve already seen, but it’s not.  If you approach it like you already know, you’ll miss what’s really there.” Cancer

Sure, I’m all about understanding.  And as an introverted idea-packager it’s my temperament and you might say obsession to drill down to identify all the variables and aspects to why somebody lies — like our current President.  My best reference, if anyone else is interested, is “Fantasyland: How America Went Haywire: A 500-Year History” by Kurt Andersen. 

“5”  Steve Nash, 45: “Sincerity is better than falsehood, but one person’s truth won’t make a difference for all involved.  You go 10 steps beyond to really understand and present solutions likely to help.” Aquarius

Not, just for today, but for as long as I can remember.  Thank you Jobs for allowing me to swipe your Holiday Tau.

“5”  Steve Jobs, (1955 – 2011): “You’re drawn to unexplored territories today, and you’ll map out the terrain for those who come along later.” Pisces

Image Credit: Wikimedia Commons

Inspired by Holiday Mathis – Creators Syndicate

Desperation on Such a Summer’s Day

The Tau of Steves: What You Don’t Know Could Fill a Book

Summer

June 2019

“5”  Steve McQueen (1930 – 1980): Little thoughts come and go.  Write them down; record them somehow.” Aries

Slim pickings today, on June 2nd in the TauBit patch. What’s that old wive’s tale?  “Quality over quantity,” or some such?

Random ones that make me want change my sign.

You’d be justified if you figured that I felt desperate enough to fill in the blanks with Holiday Tau from McQueen and Aoki, right?  Who knew Day 43 of My 1-Year Experiment would be so lame?

Well, actually the first Steve’s turns out to be a description of how an associative thinker flits from one moment to another and has to write thoughts down for later use.  But accumulate enough of those written on scraps of paper and in spiral notebooks by hand and you’ve created a monster.

How do you find the passage just when you need it? 

Here’s what I was forced to do:

‘Transience, novelty and diversity stretch and mutate our limits of adaptability.’

From my journal:  Triangle 339 (a sketch a triangle with the page number 339 in the middle)

‘As the transience index, or rate of turnover of things, places, people, organizations, and informational relationships spurts upwards, we are simultaneously the most free and lost.‘”

“5”  Steve McQueen (1930 – 1980): Little thoughts come and go.  Write them down; record them somehow.” Aries

Turns out I’ll trade the Holiday Tau for these two Steves for any weak TauBit meant for Zahn, Winkler, Emma the Baroness and me any day of the week.  Check out this passage, one of three steps for making the best decision you can before you move to that little Colorado mountain town your dreams.

“5”  Steve Aoki, 41: “Just because you can see trouble ahead where others can’t that doesn’t make you a pessimist.” Sagittarius

Image Credit:  Wikimedia Commons

Inspired by:  Holiday Mathis – Creators Syndicate

Day 37 of My 1-Year Experiment

The Tau of Steves: What You Don’t Know Could Fill a Book

Spring

May 2019

“4”  Steve Smith, 30: Set yourself up so that it’s almost impossible not to fulfill your aim.  This isn’t cheating; it’s just smart management of resources.” Gemini

What’s it like to retire?  Emma the Baroness and I love Chris Erskine’s columns. They hilariously mirror our stage in life.  His more recent pieces, especially today on  5/11/19, can be bitter sweet and poignant. This is a passage I find inspiring: 

“In retirement, I’ll anchor a rowboat in the middle of a rural lake and take long naps in the Southern sun. If I forget to fish, so what? For me, retirement will be a verb. In a couple more years … As he left, I got the first bad buzz of empty nesthood, a profoundly life-changing condition for a generation of parents who have probably over-invested — emotionally and financially — in our kids. When he leaves for college in two years, my only dependents will be these idiot dogs, one of which might be a wolf.” 

Random ones that make me want change my sign.

So, you’re saying this isn’t cheating? Just slightly illegal? Swiping another Steve’s Holiday Tau?  While there’s no rowboat in our future, we’ve taken care of the basics with financial planning.

“4”  Steve Smith, 30: Set yourself up so that it’s almost impossible not to fulfill your aim.  This isn’t cheating; it’s just smart management of resources.” Gemini

Image Credit:  Wikimedia Commons

Inspired by: Holiday Mathis – Creators Syndicate

Day 28 of My 1-Year Experiment

The Tau of Steves: What You Don’t Know Could Fill a Book

Spring

April 2019

4/26/19. Have I mentioned this before?  I tend to select Holiday Tau that is more practical in nature.  Maybe it’s one of those categories that will emerge over the course of the year.

Random ones that make me want change my sign.

I’ve gotten myself into a kind of rhythm of composing, revising, adding photos, adding a title and subtitle and finishing off the published piece with action steps you can follow. 

In Knowledge Banking: Wealthy Choices. Healthy Lives I published “Flocking” all about “How Charles, Arthur And Dudley Find New Communities Across The West” highlighting Town and Rural areas that have population density scores under 40. 

This category includes exurbs, towns, farming communities and a wide range of other rural areas.

Charles, Arthur and Dudley illustrate how to take four action steps for moving to the place of their dreams. 

“4”  Steve Greene, 34; Steve Guttenberg, 61: You don’t have to worry about how you’re going to get to the end of this project.  What matters is how you’re going to get to the end of the next 10 minutes of it, and then the 10 minutes after that.  Keep chugging.” Libra

Inspired by Holiday Mathis – Creators Syndicate

60-Minute Habit

Day Two:  “Gather learning materials to help you practice your service before taking on a client.”

First Cup at Zero Dark Thirty
Now what?  I’ve gathered boxes of stuff and identified 11 ways of working through a process.

Reviewing this step described by AnyWired now, dredges up my feelings of confusion.

Instead of the blank page problem any author encounters before (or after) that 5 a.m. perked brew, I faced the opposite.

Feeling overwhelmed.

Awash in a Sea of Papers

Too many materials gathered, digitized and sitting in desk piles on my first floor home office.

While this should be mainly direct practice (doing rather than reading about), you will need to gather materials to guide you here.”

Right.

Doing.

“This includes articles, interviews and tutorials.”

Right.

Look, I was moonlighting and running out of time I budgeted before my morning commute.

It will take me more than an hour just to figure out some sense of order with all this stuff.

Reports, Articles, Printouts

Travel articles from the LA Times profiling destinations and vacations along the coast in Southern California and Northern California.

Indexed in an old Mac version of Microsoft’s “Entourage Notes” with full text of the article and linked to their file categorized by:

“Lone Eagle”;

  • Listing of best places by year from 2005 – 2010 and
  • Tools / websites for finding the best; and
  • Regions – western states and Hawaii / Tropical.

And by another category – by “Do What You Love Scenarios:”

  • High Country Eagles,
  • Permanently Temporary,
  • Wealthy Influentials and
  • Wireless Resorters

(16 Lifestyles, 4 for each).

I’m panicked.

Just then a thought bubble popped above my head.

If Only. What if?

What if somehow customers and clients could use my system for tagging the Internet sites and articles on Delicious, the social book marking site?

But, why and how?

Focus mainly on developing techniques you could actually see yourself using in client work.

1.  List of online resources?

2.  Seasonal comparison summaries by categories:  Best Places, Green Planet, High Country Eagles and Wireless Resorters?

You should spend at least 1 hour per day just developing your skill.

I know,

I know.

  • Maybe I could write about how to use delicious (aka knowledge bank) for the sequence of initiating coverage of a best place community?
  • How to use the Internet to build a knowledge bank for finding the right place?
  • How would a potential reader, customer or client?
  • It may begin with a vacation to a favorite destination.

For the first time you’ll want to figure out your route and itinerary, right?

  • Usually you have a region in mind, with some ideas where you might want to visit.
  • You may start with a map of a region within the West or of Hawaii.
  • You can start saving bookmarks about potential places, to revisit later.

Or you recall a trip you took out west a few years ago.

  • From California to Nevada and Arizona.
  • Up to Colorado and back through Utah and Nevada to your return to California.

A name rings a bell when you read an article about the list of top places to retire published by AARP – Loveland, Colorado.

Loveland, Colorado. The Gateway to the Rockies
  • You spend a little time on the Internet and discover, it’s been singled out as a great place to retire on the water.
  • In 2009 it was singled out as a best place to live.
  • You recall the fun you had hiking through the nearby Rocky Mountain National Park.
  • What were the names of some of those other places you saw on the way?
Awesome Views from Rocky Mountain National Park

You wonder if it is right for you?

  • After all US News & World Report ranked it 7th on their top 10 places to live in 2009;
  • right ahead of San Luis Obispo, California and
  • behind front-runner Albuquerque, New Mexico, # 3 Austin, Texas and #4 Boise, Idaho.

Now you’ve got your work cut out for you.

Here’s a way to find out.

1.  I recommend beginning with Wikipedia and WikiTravel for a quick summary, local history some pictures and the zip code or zip codes.  You’ll see a map of the state, a subset of that map for it’s county.  WikiTravel profiles vacation attractions – directions and transportation, where to stay overnight, where you should eat and play.  It gives you ideas for visiting local attractions and doing more when you consider a broader vicinity.  So you can plan for a long weekend or a one or more week vacation.

2.  If you aren’t interested in Loveland you can stop there and consider San Luis Obispo next.  Maybe, for this time of year you want to visit the desert instead of the mountains.  Or take a vacation along the coast. Or islands – like Catalina off the coast of Southern California or one of the Hawaiian Islands. If you like lakes and rivers, then Loveland may be worth further investigation.

3.  For our purposes, we are assuming that you really want to move, invest in, work in and around, start a business or retire in a new community that doubles as a vacation resort and with pristine quality of lifestyle activities.  Otherwise, why bother?

4.  So, grab the zip code and go to Google and search on the 5 digits.  You’ll find a map which will show you where this destination is in relation to its surrounding area.  You see photo slide shows and videos of the area.  You can switch to satellite views and hybrid map views.

5.  Still believe this town maybe a keeper?  Jump to Claritas to check out the types of people who already live in the neighborhoods.  Birds of a Feather Flock Together.  Neighborhoods change slowly.  They attract the same kinds of people over time.  If you plan to move, invest, work, start a business or retire, you’ll want to see if residents match your criteria.

6.  We’ve already done the heavy lifting for you by identifying neighborhood characteristics by age and stage of life of their residents.  Single (20-20, 25-54, or 30-44).  Couple (55+ or 65+). Family (20-44, 25-54, 35-54). Empty Nests (55+).  Mid-Lifers (30-44).  Baby Boomers (45+ or 55+). Seniors ( 65+).

7.  And, we’ve compared neighborhoods by status and density.  From Wealthy Influentials and Wireless Resorters to High Country Eagles and Permanent Temporaries.  And from Metropolitan to Suburban to Small Cities and Country Towns.  So, if you want to narrow your focus to neighborhoods with 25-54 year old families in Wireless Resorts, then you can find a list that no other top 10 magazine list can provide.

8.  Let’s say you’ve compared and narrowed your search for real estate investments.  Check out City-Data for in-depth demographics and regional, county and zip code statistics – including the number of registered sex offenders.

9.  If you plan to move, you should search by zip code on Weather Underground to find a wealth of weather patterns including tornadoes, hurricanes and other disasters for each season, but especially for January and June to determine just how inviting your new vacation resort will be.  You may just decide to live there for six months and somewhere else for the other.  In the mountains for skiing and snowboarding and then at the beach for surfing and sun bathing.

10. Need a job?  Check the openings by zip code from two Internet sites – Indeed and Simply Hired.  You’ll want to take a couple of job hunting or house hunting trips before your final decision.  Make a vacation of it by returning to WikiTravel to line up the best accommodations, or visit My New Place for a listing, map and photos of rentals by zip code.

11.  We know that the best positions are hidden.  You find them by a chain of referrals and introductions.  How do you create a new network?  Use your zip code and key word description of the town in LinkedIn’s advanced search function and begin contacting the first few of 100 local introductions.

Now what?

Is this really a business?

I’ve gathered boxes of stuff and identified 11 ways of working through a process.

And, I know it will take more that another 60 minutes.

Day One: Behind the Scenes

 

Appeal

“Find one or two lifestyles that describe you, then the logic goes other neighborhoods that attract the same  “Birds-of-a-Feather” lifestyle would appeal to you.”

Peel Away the Outer to Find Your Inner Appeal
An ongoing case study: How to convert thousand lesser fans into a thousand true fans, so they buy enough to support you and make a little profit?

Here’s the part I’ve always hated.

Crafting the sales message.

And, there’s a little irony.

To be successful you have to appeal to human motivations and I earned a masters degree in psychology.

The problem for me has always been that as a professional knowledge worker — in my case a consultant, coach and trusted advisor — we were trained not to advertise or to market ourselves

The path to a thousand raving fans was taken one referral step at a time.

No Advertising or Sales

Not by running ads.

Or by selling.

But by transforming clients with so much value they became enthusiastic advocates.

Can you advertise and sell online without crossing over into the “scam territory?”

Sure.

For the last few years I found plenty of information and inside intelligence that online marketers and other less scrupulous “Make Money Online” entrepreneurs misused.

But some of it could and should be used by legitimate consultants and lifestyle business owners.

Formula for Attraction

How can you convert a thousand Lesser Fans into a thousand True Fans?

So they buy enough to support you and make a little profit?

Keep these tips in mind.

One of the things that motivates you is to avoid unpleasant things.

Will your “knowledge product” – book or ebook, for instance – save your true fans from making a fool of themselves?

If Only You Knew in Time

Remember high school and how embarrassed you felt from time to time because you didn’t know or understand what everyone else did?

Television ads reminded us how bad our breath smelled or our stinky body odor offended the those around us.

We didn’t have a clue.

Others did though.

Or so the ads implied

There’s that whole wall of worry.

Stuff that makes us uncomfortable.

Things like worrying about having enough money …

  • for paying our monthly bills,
  • for our doctor visits,
  • for the car payment and
  • for what the insurance company won’t pay because of our high collision deductible.

As an entrepreneur you wake up abruptly at 3 a.m. in the dark doubting your ability.

  • Money is running out.

    Gotta Get Back To Sleep
  • Did you seriously underestimated the market for your product or service?
  • Can your knowledge product or service offer peace of mind ?

During the Great Recession we all worried if we would keep our jobs.

If we lost them we worried we might not find another one that paid as well located within a reasonable commuting distance.

Just before the Memorial Day holiday a couple of years ago one of the Chief Marketing Officers who volunteers to mentor our Executive MBA students shocked me.

I knew he lost his job, which comes with the territory when you reach age 50 and finally pull in the big bucks.

What I didn’t realize was how traumatic his situation was.

Now What?

He lost his house because he couldn’t make payments on his mortgage – a wapping $6,000 a month.

And he had to find and move into a two bedroom apartment that long weekend.

Plus lease a storage unit for all the stuff that wouldn’t fit.

Not only did he and his wife suffer the loss of their home and their wealthy influential lifestyle that came part and parcel with it, but their basic feelings of security disappeared that weekend.

Neither he nor his wife could qualify for for social security or medicare coverage.

At least not for another 12 years.

But, the truly shocking part he told me was he had taken out and spent equity loans while he drained his 401K accounts to make his lavish lifestyle “ends meet.”

In my chapter, “Why Careers Are like Real Estate Markets,” I described the dilemma many like my CMO friend faced.

They find themselves at the cross roads between “Doing What You Love vs. Doing What You Hate” and “Living in the Same Geographical Location vs. Moving to a New Preferred Community.”

“My passion and location stories described four different communities …  ‘Wealthy Influentials,’ ‘Wireless Resorters,’ ‘High Country Eagles,’ and ‘Permanent Temporaries.’”

Here’s a snapshot of each.

Permanent Temporaries don’t anticipate the future well and have a hard time adapting to new work realities. 

Many become consultants and entrepreneurs because they can’t find full-time employment. 

Guarded Gate Communities

They aspire to live in, or return to, the guarded-gate communities of the Wealthy Influentials. 

What if they’re forced to relocate, where do they go?

When forced to move to lower cost-of-living neighborhoods they choose small university towns populated with High Country Eagles in higher quality-of-life communities. 

But, they long for face-to-face project-based work as a way of affiliating with other people on a more regular basis.  

Succeeding at interim work demonstrates their value in a new organization. 

What about the trade offs?

Between projects they miss the teamwork and seek to counterbalance the isolation and extreme independence they are forced to endure being on their own – no matter if they’re  interim middle managers, trapped urbanites or just starting over in a new marriage, neighborhood or way of life.

Wealthy Influentials live in neighborhoods that showcase their status and affluence

Viewed from the outside, it’s as if they’ve cornered the market with a wealth-generating machine. 

Like my Executive MBA Mentor once was able to afford …

They find a safe haven for high margin income, pay for a high cost of living, accumulate peak real estate appreciation, and live in a secluded, secure, and mature suburbs or an upscale metropolitan center. 

Selling products or services to this group means offering highly personalized, luxury, and one-of-a-kind experiences.

What if you found yourself in a similar situation?

How about …

Quality-of-Life Lifestyles

Wireless Resorters share the love of a new quality-of-life community with High Country Eagles. 

They realize that with the ability to operate anywhere there is Internet access, anyone can move to unspoiled smaller towns and rural regions. 

Many moved to the mountains areas that became destination vacation  areas like the ski resorts in Colorado.

All four lifestyles populate thousands of thousands of communities from coast to coast.

Across the western region of the United States you’ll find residents in Wealthy Influential neighborhoods like Del Mar or Coronado in California; 

High Country Eagle towns like Sedona or Bisbee in Arizona or Angel Fire and Taos in New Mexico; 

Permanent Temporaries parts of Reno, Nevada or Coeur d’Alene, Idaho; 

or, in some of the better known ski resorts attracting the Wireless Resorters like Breckenridge and Steamboat Springs in Colorado.” 

What if you could find the perfect town for you with just the right kind of neighborhood you’d love?

Claritas, now Nielsen Segmentation, helped pioneer market segments initially based on each new census update.

They linked consumer behaviors for “shopping, financial, media and much more …” with household lifestyles living in specific zip codes across the United States.

Household Shopping Lifestyles

If you’ve ever received direct mail addressed to you or “current resident” those marketers are taking advantage of household data.

The key to their business model unlocks a specific zip code.

In their PRIZM segmentation you can slice and dice over 60 different lifestyles ranging from high to low degrees of affluence and status.

By age and life stage.

Type in your current zip code and they’ll supply you with the top four or five lifestyles in your community.

Find one or two lifestyles that describe you, then the logic goes other neighborhoods that attract the same  “Birds-of-a-Feather” lifestyle would appeal to you.

Try to search for that lifestyle in their segmentation database and build a “Bucket List” of awesome zip code neighborhoods.

Can’t do it.

Doesn’t work that way.

  • But, what if you devoted the time to reverse engineer it?
  • And, you “mobilized” your lifestyle business?
  • Once you authentically built your virtual community of a 1000 raving fans?
  • You could move them with you, right?

And, you’d be able to zero in on regions and communities varying from …

  • high to low  density,
  • from urban to suburban, exurban, rural and
  • remote populations.

You wouldn’t have to worry about making a living solely from the locals.

Instead, you’d live that quality-of-life that can bring out the best in you.

More on that later.

An excerpt from Book Two in “The Knowledge Path Series” dedicated to helping you make more money from a lifestyle businesses you’re truly passionate about.