S4 E24 — Another Spooky Role to Play on the Outside

Who are these people? Milley summarized and scribbled. Big Threat: domestic terrorism. Steve Bannon’s vision coming to life. Bring it all down, blow it up, burn it, and emerge with power.

The Tau of Steves: What You Don’t Know Could Fill a Book

“5”  Steve Zahn, 51: “You don’t set out on an adventure; you just set out. The harrowing fun starts when expectations are not met, tools fail and plans disintegrate. This is the kind of gift that money can’t buy.” Scorpio

Hi and welcome to Sunday’s 24th Episode in Season 4 of  Our Disruptively Resilient Year” on this 10th day of April in the spring of 2022.

The Tau of Steves: What You Don’t Know Could Fill a Book

Table of Contents

We concluded the three-year examination of how bits of wisdom changed — during the “normal” pre-pandemic year compared to the pandemic year, and more recently to the paradoxically normal year. 

Season Four continues now within domestic and global chaos.

Previously in Season Four, The Disruptively Resilient Year

S4 E23When In Doubt, Follow the MoneyS4 E22Now, Who Could Argue With That? S4 E21Not Since the War of 1812

Related from Season Three, the Paradoxically Normal Year

S3 E24Reunion on the Edge of the Pacific Ocean near Legoland? Hell Yeah!; S3 E23Free from the Pile of Rubble in Your Brain; S3 E22What’s the Experiment Got To Do with the Exodus from Barb’s Bunny Ranch?; S3 E21Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and My Curiosity Whisperer Walking a Yip-Yippy Dog

Related from Season Two, the Pandemic Year

S2 E24Working Remote from KnowWhere Atoll; S2 E23Gaping Loss No Amount of Mourning Will Heal; S2 E22Paranoid Rose Review and Traffic-Copped Check Out Lines; S2 E21Cycles of History Rhyming with Endlessly Disruptive Rhythms?

Related from Season One, the Normal Year

S1 E24Day 24 of My 1-Year Experiment; S1 E23Day 23 of My 1-Year Experiment; S1 E22Day 22 of My 1-Year Experiment; S1 E21Day 21 of My 1-Year Experiment;

Context

Bob Woodward and Robert Costa reported in their book “Peril,” that Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, General Milley, jotted some thoughts, “Who are these people?”

He jotted rapidly: 

    • “6MWE”
    • “Extreme Tea Party” 
    • “QAnon,” he added, taking note of the fully discredited conspiracy theory. 
    • “Patriot Movement,” a far-right militia. 
    • “We the People Movement” 
    • “Nazis” 
    • “Proud Boys” 
    • “The Oath Keepers” 
    • “Newsmax,” the conservative news website, which had been friendly toward Trump for a long time. 
    • “Epoch,” referring to the The Epoch Times, a far-right publication that was critical of the Chinese Communist Party. 

Milley summarized and scribbled. “Big Threat: domestic terrorism. Steve Bannon’s vision coming to life.” 

Bring it all down, blow it up, burn it, and emerge with power.

From the Devil’s Bargain

2016 Bannon’s Vision playing out as a Nationalism Movement

Bannon saw evidence of Western collapse in the influx of Muslim refugees and migrants across Europe and the United States—what he pungently termed “civilizational jihad personified by this migrant crisis.”

Bannon’s response to the rise of modernity was to set populist, right-wing nationalism against it.

He aligned himself with:           

    • Archconservative Catholics such as Raymond Leo Burke,
    • Nigel Farage and UKIP, 
    • Marine Le Pen’s National Front, 
    • Geert Wilders and the Party for Freedom, and 
    • Sarah Palin and the Tea Party.

For all his paranoid alarm, Bannon believes that the rise of nationalist movements across the world, from Europe to Japan to the United States, heralds a return to tradition.

“You have to control three things,” he explained, “Borders, currency, and military and national identity.

The clearest example of Traditionalist political influence today is in Russia.

Vladimir Putin’s chief ideologist, Alexander Dugin—whom Bannon has cited—translated (Julius) Evola’s work into Russian and later developed a Russian-nationalist variant of Traditionalism known as Eurasianism.

By installing Bannon, Conway, and later David Bossie to run his 2016 election campaign, Trump was handing the reins of a half-billion-dollar political enterprise to a seasoned team of professional anti-Clinton operatives.

These three figures from the Republican fringe, and the menagerie of characters they brought with them, were suddenly in charge of running major-party presidential campaign—against an opponent, Hillary Clinton, whom they’d been plotting to tear apart for the better part of twenty-five years.

Campaign to winning the 2016 election transition

Philip Rucker and Carol Leonnig wrote that Bannon had previously run the conservative website Breitbart conduit to his indispensable base,

“The racist, sexist, homophobic, xenophobic, Islamophobic ‘you name it.’”

Given what transpired since the early days of the Trump administration, it’s bizarre to consider who was being considered for key positions.

Initially, Kushner, Bannon, and others in Trump’s inner circle favored Rudy Giuliani for attorney general.

Trump allowed Bannon, son-in-law Jared Kushner, and daughter Ivanka to operate as independent forces.  

During one version of musical chairs, General John Kelly left his position at Homeland Security to reign in the cats and establish an adult in the administration based on his years of service in the Marines.

As White House Chief of Staff, “I’m here to defend the Constitution and to defend the rule of law,” General John Kelly told the other officials in attendance. “The oath doesn’t say anything in there about being loyal to the president. It doesn’t say anything in there about the GOP being more important than your integrity.”

Don McGahn, Chief Council and Bannon both asked for lawyer Ty Cobb’s help in removing Kushner and Ivanka. Cobb’s view was also partly shaped by a careful reading of the palace intrigue. Bannon might be the next to go instead.

Trump dismissed Bannon, embody the White House’s dysfunction and self-destructive tendencies. The discarding of Bannon underscored the fact that the president wanted all the glory for himself.

Yet, before the final curtain fell, over 140 people were granted clemency with a stroke of Trump’s pen near midnight on January 19, including: 

    • Rapper Lil Wayne, 
    • former Detroit mayor Kwame Kilpatrick, and 
    • countless other allies in politics and business, and
    • Bannon

It wasn’t the case of gone, but not forgotten, but more like Bannon had another role to play on the outside.

Evidence

Today’s Holiday Theme: 

In short, do not underestimate the danger of disrespectful words. They are like dryer lint — seemingly harmless garbage that is, in fact, highly flammable.

“5”  Steve Zahn, 51: “You don’t set out on an adventure; you just set out. The harrowing fun starts when expectations are not met, tools fail and plans disintegrate. This is the kind of gift that money can’t buy.” Scorpio

So this is the 4th Season of my adventure — what was intended to last one year living like an artist in a natural experiment.  Then came the pandemic.  And followed by a four-year administration seemingly immune to accountability, and then a different new normal post-pandemic and now one within a global crisis a potential WWIII.  Where is the fun?  Which tools haven’t we used? 

Random ones that make me want change my sign.

“4”  Steve McQueen (1930 – 1980): “Whether you choose to hang back and observe or jump in and participate, do it because you want to, not because someone is pressuring you. If you need support in standing up for yourself, here it is.” Aries

Savvy advice for any introvert like me.  Like Raskin, I never envisioned an insurrection.  I naively hoped removal by a fair and square election would put the Putin-like propaganda from the Oval Office out to sea.  Alas …

“4”  Steve Smith, 30, Stevie Nicks, 72: “Emotions warp the space-time continuum. Fear, waiting and discomfort make the seconds go by agonizingly slow. Joy, fascination and fun speed things up.” Gemini

What a brilliant opening line — warping space-time continuum with emotions.  But, the observation that wallowing in FUD stretches the sense to passing time is golden.  As is all those joyful moments that slip by in an instant.

“4”  Steve Aoki, 41; Steven Spielberg, 74: “As playwrights know, people have a very short attention span for exposition. You’ll quickly get to the heart of the story and have the complete attention of your audience.” Sagittarius

What is it that parents always say?  Do as I say, not as I do.  My only hope today is to have the format for today’s episode help me help you get to the heart of the story.  Does it work?

Steve Harvey, 62; Stephan Patis, 53;  Stephen Hawking (1943 – 2018): “New people juice your curiosity. You’ll learn more through friendly playfulness and observation than you could possibly find out by asking direct questions.” Capricorn

What’s Going On

Literally Bottled and Set Adrift from KnowWhere Atoll

    • @KnowLabs suite of 36 digital magazines, according to my analytics, grew from 12559 this week to 12654 organically grown followers.
    • Orange County Beach Towns 172 viewers stopped by the week before.

Foresight

Quality-of-Life

Long-Form

    • “Here, Right Matters: An American Story” by Alexander Vindman. “We’d long been confused by the president’s policy of accommodation and appeasement of Russia, the United States’ most pressing major adversary. Russia’s president Vladimir Putin invaded Ukraine, seizing the Crimean Peninsula, attacking its industrial heartland, the Donbass, from the capital, Kyiv. By 2019, little had changed, Russian military and security forces and their proxy separatists continued to occupy the Donbass. The biggest change was to Ukraine’s importance as a bulwark against Russian aggression weeks earlier, the White House had abruptly put a hold on nearly four hundred million dollars.” 
    • David Enrich begins his book with a suicide in “Deutsche Bank Dark Towers: Deutsche Bank, Donald Trump, and an Epic Trail of Destruction” and then meticulously details the bank’s Russian money laundering operations. Deutsche’s Russian business surged after revenues had fallen 50% due to the 2008 financial crisis. Putin’s Russia, poured in to Deutsche from deals it did with VTB Bank, linked to the Kremlin’s intelligence apparatus. Deutsche positioned itself as a crucial cog in “The Laundromat” by doing what couldn’t be done — processing cross-border transactions for banks that were too small  and didn’t have offices outside their home countries.
    • “Unthinkable: Trauma, Truth, and the Trials of American Democracy” by Jamie Raskin recalls one tragedy no parent should endure — the suicide of his son — and then a second tragedy at almost the same time — the insurrection on January 6th 2021, that terrified he and his congressional peers who were tasked by the Constitution to routinely oversee the orderly transfer of power from one former president to the duly elected new President. 
    • “A Warning” by Anonymous (Miles Taylor) written prior to the January 6th Insurrection as an insider’s account documenting how frequently the former President’s behavior and rage without any “guard rails” showed just how far he would go to win the next election at any cost while spinning lies and misinformation on top of each other.  
    • “Peril” by Bob Woodward and Robert Costa provides anecdotes, stories and inside reporting documenting the controversial last days of Donald Trump’s presidency, as well as the presidential transition and early presidency of Joe Biden. 
    • “Devil’s Bargain: Steve Bannon, Donald Trump, and the Nationalist Uprising,” by Joshua Green tracks the money behind the scenes leading up to the 2016 presidential election and the growing influence of Steve Bannon’s network of extreme nationalists.

Image Credit: Wikimedia Commons

Inspired by Holiday Mathis – Creators Syndicate

CENTER FOR KNOWLEDGE CREATION AND INNOVATION

The Knowledge Path | Know Laboratories | Knowledge Banking | Knowledge ATMs | Western Skies and Island Currents | Best West Road Trip

S2 E60 — She Began to Weep…

Curiosity drives discoveries in science and innovation.  It pushes knowledge forward.  But, predictability and certainty favor the status quo and our homeostasis because without them our mind grinds to a halt. So what can you do?

“5”  Steve Howey, 42:When the solution eludes you, tackle it backward, inside out or upside down — any other way than the usual. What’s needed is a fresh approach.” Cancer

Hi and welcome to Sunday’s Episode 60 in Season 2 of  “My Pandemic Year Natural Experiment” on this 7th day of June in the summer of 2020.  

“The Tau of Steves: What You Don’t Know Could Fill a Book”

Table of Contents

Season One and Two are a two-year examination of how bits of wisdom changed during the “normal” pre-pandemic and then in this unfolding pandemic year.

Previously in Season Two, the Pandemic Year

S2 E59See What You’ve Been Missing; S2 E58Check Back in 18 Months; S2 E57Science and Medicine or Politically-Motivated Misinformation? 

Related from Season One, the Normal Year

S1 E60Overlapping Cycles of Life; S1 E59Where Did All the Dillon Millennials Go? Eureka!; S1 E58Judging a Stroll from the Hotel Santa Barbara to the Lobero Theater; S1 E57More or Less in the Know

Context

So, if you’re an introvert like me, then you understand how the forced solitude brought on by this Pandemic gives me the wonderful opportunity to work on my neglected manuscript I’ve been calling “Volume Three — a Legacy.”

Here’s an excerpt from the first draft or Chapter One .

AJ noticed him heading her way. “How’d you sleep?” she asked sitting in the kitchen as the sun rose in the East chasing the last moments of gray away.  Except for the gray she felt in her chest.

“OK, I guess, well no not really.  It’s just so weird sleeping in my old room.” Shaggy replied as he walked on the still shiny dark brown laminated wooden floor from the living room and past the long teak table in the dining room where all the family gatherings took place — Thanksgiving, especially Christmas Eve and Christmas Day — into the glaring California illuminated morning light.

“Coffee’s ready,” she said.

“Oh, OK, great.” Shaggy mumbled. He rubbed his tired eyes and turned left into the white u-shaped kitchen with white cabinets surrounding stainless steel dishwasher, stove, microwave and refrigerator.

Following his nose sniffing out the early morning fragrance just past the refrigerator on his right he mumbled something that AJ couldn’t hear as she sat in “his seat” with her back to the ever brightening morning streaming in through the sliding glass door.

“You wanna sit here?”

He opened the only unattached white cabinet on the opposite wall which hung above the light gray backsplash next to the white bay window behind the sink and next to the kitchen table.  He grabbed a dark blue mug, spun and headed back to the coffee maker.

“No, thanks.  I’m gonna just sit on the couch for a minute or two and sip this Folgers.”

Timing was off.

AJ landed at John Wayne Airport in Orange County, California from her home with Darin in Winter Park, Florida in Orange County where it is normally three hours later on any day of the week, especially on this one.  

The one she hadn’t been looking forward to.

Which is why she was up first.  Why she had tossed and turned in the other guest bedroom at the top of the stairs. Why she laid awake with a deeply sad feeling beginning three hours earlier at 3:30 am PST.

Shaggy walked past the blonde oblong wooden kitchen table to AJ’s left to the first of two matching couches that separated the kitchen from the family room in one big room.  

He could see himself in the mirror display on the opposite wall as he padded the few steps deeper into the room and stopped turned left and found his spot on the first couch facing the second butted up to the light gray painted wall and the mirror displays.

The smaller mirrors distorted his image.  

And being 6’ 4” and under these circumstances this morning the distorted reflection mirrored his internal morning fog.

AJ rose from the kitchen table deciding to join him instead of talking to his back.  She slid down the small space between Shaggy’s couch and the fireplace next to the patio door walked 6 or 7 steps on gray tile hearth into the family room and maneuvered herself carefully around the round dark wood coffee table that now separated her and Shaggy.

Her view back into the kitchen would be the money shot if she and Shaggy decided to put the place on the market.  To her left the original white cabinet doors along the floor hid blankets for winter viewing of the big black screen TV from each couch when the California temperature dropped into the 50s.  Brrr. Except for anybody else not living in Florida or California.

They hid board games from childhood and all kinds of things that would eventually require sorting and boxing, not something she was prepared to entertain at this moment.

And the original bookshelves displayed pictures of the two blond brothers, Shaggy and Jazzy, AJ’s photoshoot near high school graduation.  And, books and plates and CDs, and a wine rack and more pictures and photo albums and ….

“Remember when Jazzy was a baby and you could hold him in the crook of your arm between you hand and elbow?” she asked out of the blue.

“No, not really. I was only four when he was born at Hoag Hospital, but I do remember you visiting every summer,” Shaggy said. 

To AJ’s right on the end table next to the wicker basket on the floor for collecting “The Los Angeles Times” newspaper Jazzy loved to use for starting a fire was a photo showing AJ in a white wedding gown smiling and a slice of a backdrop from the Outer Banks hotel where she and Darin tied the knot and Shaggy celebrated with a canoe filled with beer followed by his gigantic migraine dwarfing hangover the next morning — actually afternoon.

“I remember the back yard before they changed it.  It didn’t have the tan slope stone walls, but I think the black wrought iron railing stretched across the back from side to side.  And there used to be giant ficus trees in corners and a small round cement patio surrounded in grass,” she told Shaggy.

“Yeah,” he said.

That’s where they tossed a whiffle ball and played catch until probably Shaggy began hitting the ball with the big red plastic bat over the fence and down into the slope on purpose.  

“Somewhere there’s a picture of all of us in front of the tree on the grass around here I bet,” she said. “And probably that one where we four kids posed in front of the then white front door on the red brick entrance.”

“I remember when our parents threw that karaoke party when Jazzy graduated high school and I graduated college and you and Darin flew out for the Mexican foot catering affair.”

“That’s the one where Darin tipped over the container of margarita salt on the grass which killed it in no short order, right?  Dad never let him forget.  He once wrote on a birthday card that to commemorate the occasion they had a brass metal plate made up engraved with the date and his name and …” she began to weep.

Evidence

Random ones that make me want change my sign.

Today’s Holiday Birthday:  

You’ll be called on to do something you haven’t done before. You’ll be both inspired and inspirational. A group will form around your leadership as you apply past experience to figure things out. Results beyond your expectations will come at the start of the new year. Your family grows in March 2021.

OK, let’s check back in 9 months!

“5”  Steve McQueen (1930 – 1980): “It only takes one connection to make your personal life go from being a stale routine to an inspired journey. You’ll make that connection today and a transformation will occur in the weeks to come.” Aries  

So you’re saying this connection is an antidote for pandemic cabin fever?  That transformation … will it come from a person kind of connection or from a answer that has eluded my pursuit?

“4”  Steve Smith, 30: You’ll be gifted with an emotion that is one click beyond passion and desire: rage. Rage doesn’t have to be angry or negative, but it’s always powerful, and best focused on what’s important to you.” Gemini

OK, this TauBit of Wisdom scares me and intrigues me.  How do you focus it without doing irreparable damage?

“5”  Steve Howey, 42:When the solution eludes you, tackle it backward, inside out or upside down — any other way than the usual. What’s needed is a fresh approach.” Cancer

Thanks for breaking the log jam.  I just couldn’t figure out how to start this manuscript.

“4”  Steve Carrell, 57; Steve Martin, 74; Steve Wozniak, 69: Whomever you align yourself with, you grow to be more like. It isn’t necessary for you to have a personal relationship with your role models. You get to choose them from the whole wide world.” Leo

There’s such a long list, but one of the most influential is Toffler (see immediately below) and more recently Kurt Andersen who wrote “Fantasyland” which is both an update and a framework in which to view Future Shock.

“4”  Steve Greene, 34; Steve Guttenberg, 61; Stephen King, 72:Your famous adaptability will kick in. From the outside, your behavior may look illogical, but there’s definitely a method to your madness. When an unusual situation crops up, an unusual reaction is warranted.” Virgo

Should this be true about me, I feel the need to honor Alvin Toffler who alerted me to disruption and how to adapt or accommodate changes on the horizon.

“4”  Steve Aoki, 41: Passions build slowly. At first, you don’t even realize what you want. When leanings turn to yearnings and become undeniable in their message, it’s a blessing that doesn’t feel like one.” Sagittarius

Who can resist such a phrase, “learnings turn to yearnings”?  But the point of the message mystifies me, why doesn’t the blessing feel like one?  It’s still early in the day, so maybe it will be revealed in the evening or late afternoon.

“5”  Steve Nash, 45:Emotional skill and intelligence can be earned through both negative and positive experiences. Today will bring scenarios you will use as examples of what to do and what not to do.”  Aquarius

Well, of course I’d rate this TauBit of Wisdom a “5” given what it looks like we’re being trapped in for the foreseeable future. So take some time to review the Deloitte and Salesforce sponsored scenarios. 

“3”  Steve Jobs, (1955 – 2011): The possessions that you get the most value out of are the ones you use every week and maybe every day. As for the others, the more you can let go of, the lighter you’ll feel.” Pisces

So that would be describing the 500 pieces jigsaw puzzle sitting for days now on our dining room table?

Holiday Forecast for the Week Ahead:  

Curiosity is a slightly uncomfortable state of mind, as it relies on the tension between knowing and not knowing. The tension is resolved with an answer. So tenacious is our need for answers that our brains will just fill in the blanks with anything that enables us to push forward. 

The human brain craves certainty. 

Without it, we are paralyzed. Certainty facilitates action, commitment and movement. Where there is no certainty (and reality offers very little of it) humans do the next best thing; we make a good guess and come up with a theory that will allow us to go onward. If to assume is human, then not to assume is superhuman. Anyone can say, “I’m right,” and live to defend that. But it takes humility, higher thinking and a willingness to be uncomfortable inside the tension of curiosity to go to the next cognitive level — to question, wonder, revel in mystery and leave the loop open to possibility.

Whether or not today’s forecast gains currency over the next 7 days, I believe the insights ring true for me — curiosity drives discoveries in science and innovation.  It pushes knowledge forward.  But, predictability and certainty favor the status quo and our homeostasis because without them our mind grinds to a halt.  Without answers we jump to guesses and theories and conspiracy theories, unless you are the rare person who focuses the unresolved tension onto the next higher cognitive level.  

What’s Going On

Literally Bottled and Set Adrift from KnowWhere Atoll 

    • @knowlabs followers of one or more of my 35 digital magazines organically grew from 3634 to 3806.

Foresight

Quality-of-Life 

Long-Form

    • Saw the movie, didn’t realize that one of my favorite authors, Michael Connelly — his detective Hieronymus (Harry) Bosch book series and Amazon Prime series — also wrote, “The Lincoln Lawyer” which I just finished. Gotta tell you I can’t not see his lead character (Mickey Haller, Bosch’s half brother) as anyone else but Matthew McConaughey. 

Image Credit: Wikimedia Commons

Inspired by: Holiday Mathis – Creators Syndicate

CENTER FOR KNOWLEDGE CREATION AND INNOVATION

The Knowledge Path | Know Laboratories | Knowledge Banking | Knowledge ATMs | Western Skies and Island Currents | Best West Road Trip

S3 E31 —Treat It Like a Pawn Ticket to Sketchier Things

Yesterday was all about me — what and why my Holiday Tau fit me the most.  Today is filled with a disappointing gaggle of Holiday Taus for Steves.  

“2”  Steve Zahn, 51: “It’s happened before that you got what you wanted and then were somehow vaguely unsatisfied. This time, you’ll question your wants and get to the bottom of why you want it, which helps your chances of a fortifying outcome.” Scorpio

Hi and welcome to Saturday’s Episode 30 in Season 3 of  My Paradoxically Normal Year” on this 18th day of April in the spring of 2021 — which is a three-year examination of how bits of wisdom changed during the “normal” pre-pandemic year and then in the pandemic year, and now months after.

The Tau of Steves: What You Don’t Know Could Fill a Book

Table of Contents

Previously from Season Three, the Paradoxically Normal Year

S3 E30Steal These TauBits, Please. It’s Only Fair!; S3 E29Why 83.3% of the Time I Swiped Your Tau; S3 E28Why I Stole Your Daily Horoscope for a Year

Related from Season Two, The Pandemic Year

S2 E31Getting Charged from Box Automattic-aly; S2 E30It’s Crazy. Why does Amazon Prime Work, but Netflix Doesn’t?; S2 E29Three Months That Changed the World; S2 E28Hosting Norwegian Zooms While Trump Eliminated the Virus in April

Related from Season One, The Normal Year

S1 E31Day 31 of My 1-Year Experiment; S1 E30Day 30 of My 1-Year Experiment; S1 E29Day 29 of My 1-Year Experiment; S1 E28Day 28 of My 1-Year Experiment 

Context

I’d been working on the Findings Section of the report describing how for a year I lived life like an art form in a natural experiment.

The “Conclusions Section” grabbed my attention because the Holiday Tau for Zahnny, the Fonze, Emma the Baroness and me illustrates what critics level against astrology, palm reading, fortune telling and taking horoscopes too seriously. 

How could you not follow Nancy’s lead?  Not “Do It,” or, “Just Say No.” 

But first, here’s a quick and dirty 30-day summary, “Why I Stole Your Sign and the Mysteries of Your Life”.  Treat it like a pawn ticket to sketchy things I’ve learned from stealing your sign without doing the time. I feel so guilty about it that I’m willing to sell it back to you.  

When Ronald Regan sat in the oval office, his First Lady consulted with an astrologer for scheduling his important meetings.  Was this time optimum for the President?  Or was tomorrow better?  

“Mrs. Reagan’s spokesperson said of the astrologer,  ‘Air Force One didn’t take off without permission. [Nancy] set the time for summit meetings with Mikhail Gorbachev, presidential debates with Carter and Mondale…the timing of all the President’s trips abroad, of his press conferences, his State of the Union addresses.’”

I can only assume it included leading up to his speech, “Mr. Gorbachev, take down that wall.” 

After all, they were both in the acting business as celebrities before he became California’s governor and later President.

Let’s not forget what a fellow Californian and Los Angeles Lakers legend wrote:

“Intelligent imagination is vital to this sort of deduction! However improbable a hypothesis, it cannot be discarded”

 “Mycroft and Sherlock” by Kareem Abdul-Jabbar.

However comma in the Conclusions Section is the time to confirm or deny your hypothesis.  Can I get an “Amen”?  

The reason why astrology may seem like it works is because our brains are wired to look for patterns, even when none exists.  For me as a writer I found it easy to conduct “discussions” with Steves about their horoscope.  

And, that made it easy for me to bring small parts of what I’m actually thinking about, working through, or experiencing in the world like they are. 

I embarked on this experiment, and I make no apologies for it, hoping I’d find a significant inspiration or insight to solve a vexing problem, master a complicated first time challenge or just make how my day flowed a little easier.

But you can’t ignore the role of bias conspiring against reliable results: selection bias on the front end and confirmation bias on the back end. 

Self-selection bias boils down to the very human tendency to look for interpretations or confirmations for what we already hope to be true. 

To mitigate undue bias effects, I summarized what was happening behind the scenes first and then “scored” the Holiday Tau curated for that day.

Since the brain is not looking for exact matches, it can pick up some characteristics of a match and assume it fits. Astrology is no more than a test of chance and it is not a reliable way to predict personality, scientists and critics say.

Another phenomenon I noticed over the year is one astrologer’s prediction for a horoscope is typically and completely unrelated to the prediction of another astrologer for the identical horoscope. 

Oops.  

So for purposes of this natural experiment I chose consistency and stuck with Holiday Mathis throughout the year.  Your mileage may vary.

But, I had to ask and am left with, how similar is my long-term attraction to trends and predictions I research to better decide a significant course of action with the appeal of the shorter-term astrological forecasts? 

I’m attracted for entertainment purposes, yes, but, as for guidance, not much at all.  To which you can rightly point out you’ve continued this obsession into your third year! 

Guilty as charged. On top of stealing your birthday more often than not.

And, that takes us to an example of what a Wikipedia “expert” had to say about how some people become truer believers than others:

“However, many people still believe their horoscope perfectly aligns with the events in their lives. There are some possible explanations for this. Horoscopes have vague wording and are based on typical everyday activities.”

Evidence

Cases in point.

“2”  Steve Zahn, 51: “It’s happened before that you got what you wanted and then were somehow vaguely unsatisfied. This time, you’ll question your wants and get to the bottom of why you want it, which helps your chances of a fortifying outcome.” Scorpio

Random ones that make me want change my sign.

And for some reason the rest of the Holiday Tau doesn’t get much better!

“3”  Steve Greene, 34; Steve Guttenberg, 61:When they come to you with questions you can answer, it feels good to be able to help. When they come to you with questions you can’t answer, it gives you ideas about what to learn next.” Virgo

“3”  Steve Kerr, 54: You’re just following your curiosity and doing your job, but you end up growing your expertise in the process, and your influence naturally expands. With increasing power comes increasing responsibility.” Libra

“4”  Steve Aoki, 41: “Intentionally focus on what there is to be happy about. To appreciate and enjoy where you’re at is more than just a good practice; it’s a tool that keeps you connected to the best parts of your humanity.” Sagittarius

What’s Going On

Literally Bottled and Set Adrift from KnowWhere Atoll 

    • @KnowLabs suite of digital magazines jumps from 7981 to 8003 organically grown followers

Foresight

Quality-of-Life 

Long-Form

    • “Consilience: The Unity of Knowledge” by E.O. Wilson, an entomologist who studied colonies of ants for their insights.  But didn’t stop there, according to The Wall Street Journal, “A dazzling journey across the sciences and humanities in search of deep laws to unite them.” 
    • “True Believers,” the novel by Kurt Andersen (which seems to precede Fantasyland)? I like how he goes back and forth from now to the ‘60s in which the main character is writing a memoir, but needs “Okays” from her friends who had been hiding a secret for 40+ years that could ruin their careers?  Like, what’s my equivalent
    • “Disappearing Through the Skylight” by O.B. Hardison, Jr. which proceeded “Consilience” by a decade.  Hardison’s been described as a polymathic renaissance man who wrote, “… Nature has slipped, perhaps finally beyond our field of vision.”  What does it mean for “… science, history, art and architecture, music, language, ultimately, for humanity”? This one provides missing chunks of understanding where we came from and where we’re going.

Image Credit: Wikimedia Commons

Inspired by: Holiday Mathis – Creators Syndicate

CENTER FOR KNOWLEDGE CREATION AND INNOVATION

The Knowledge Path | Know Laboratories | Knowledge Banking | Knowledge ATMs | Western Skies and Island Currents | Best West Road Trips

Season Three: The Paradoxically Normal Year

“The Tau of Steves: What You Don’t Know Could Fill a Book”

Table of Contents

Season Three: The Paradoxically Normal Year

S3 E1 — Preview Day One in Season Three of the New Abnormality

S3 E2Preview of the New Post Pandemic Season

S3 E3A Pivot, a Miracle or Something Paradoxically Normal? 

S3 E4What a Fool Believes She Sees 

S3 E5Another Year Another Baby, Could Have Been Stevie like Stevie Nicks, but Noooooo! 

S3 E6What’s the Half Life of Wisdom? 

S3 E7Who Can Resist Ricky Gervais Calls in this Paradoxically Normal Year? 

S3 E8Wait, You’re Saying I Should Read It Again? 

S3 E9Melancholy and Undercover Brooklyn Moms Know Best 

S3 E10Feeding the Beast for Sheila in Fantasyland 

S3 E11Looking for a New Predictive Belief System? 

S3 E12 You Can’t Cure Stupid, but There’s a Cure for Ignorance 

S3 E13 — Why? 

S3 E14How! 

S3 E15Wait, Did I Say That Out Loud? 

S3 E16Quid Pro Quo the Awesome Kind 

S3 E17Guess What? You’re on a Treadmill Just Now Picking Up Speed 

S3 E18My Teacher is Sending You to Detention! 

S3 E19Thought Flickers, Cosmic Swirling and Exacted Costs 

S3 E20Celebrate the Anniversary of When Things Seemed So Normal 

S3 E21Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and My Curiosity Whisperer Walking a Yip-Yippy Dog

S3 E22What’s the Experiment Got To Do with the Exodus from Barb’s Bunny Ranch? 

S3 E23Free from the Pile of Rubble in Your Brain 

S3 E24Reunion on the Edge of the Pacific Ocean near Legoland? Hell Yeah! 

S3 E25 Art Lives Upon Discussion, Upon Experiment, Upon Curiosity … 

S3 E26Following Alice Down the Rabbit Hole 

S3 E27 What the World Needs Now Before It’s Too Late 

S3 E28Why I Stole Your Daily Horoscope for a Year

S3 E29Why 83.3% of the Time I Swiped Your Tau

S3 E30Steal These TauBits, Please. It’s Only Fair!

S3 E31Treat It Like a Pawn Ticket to Sketchier Things

S3 E32But, Why Should You Care?

S3 E33Do Meaningful Coincidences Really Exist?

S3 E34Why You’re Susceptible to Subliminal Suggestions Like … 

S3 E35This Ain’t No Zemblanity

S3 E36Placebo, Meaningful Coincidence or Just Feeling Lucky

 

CENTER FOR KNOWLEDGE CREATION AND INNOVATION

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S4 E20 — Living Resiliently Through Domestic and Global Chaos

Polls and polling to him are demonstrations of loyalty, not scientific measures of the country’s mood. When faced with tough challenges, he becomes unglued and bombastic.

The Tau of Steves: What You Don’t Know Could Fill a Book

“5” Steve Jobs, (1955 – 2011): “Don’t leave a situation before the agreed upon ending. It takes patience to hang in for the last bits because your mind will be racing ahead to the next thing, but just hang in there.” Pisces

Hi and welcome to Sunday’s 20th Episode in Season 4 of  Our Disruptively Resilient Year” on this 3rd day of April in the spring of 2022.

We concluded the three-year examination of how bits of wisdom changed — during the “normal” pre-pandemic year compared to the pandemic year, and more recently to the paradoxically normal year. 

Season 4 continues now within domestic and global chaos.

Previously in Season Four, The Disruptively Resilient Year

S4 E19The Reason Character and Honesty Don’t Count Anymore; S4 E18Hopelessly Naive or Too Numb to Know Any Better?; S4 E17We Regret to Inform You …;

Related from Season Three, the Paradoxically Normal Year

S3 E20Celebrate the Anniversary of When Things Seemed So Normal; S3 E19Thought Flickers, Cosmic Swirling and Exacted Costs; S3 E18My Teacher is Sending You to Detention!; S3 E17Guess What? You’re on a Treadmill Just Now Picking Up Speed;

Related from Season Two, the Pandemic Year

S2 E20Panic, Fertilizer and Least Expected Meaningful Moments; S2 E19What’s Percolating in Our Collective Unconscious?; S2 E18What is the Truth and How Can You Tell?; S2 E17Shutting Mountain Resorts Down, Closing Boutiques, Kicking Tourists Out;

Related from Season One, the Normal Year

S1 E20Day 20 of My 1-Year Experiment; S1 E19Day 19 of My 1-Year Experiment; S1 E18Day 18 of My 1-Year Experiment; S1 E17Day 17 of My 1-Year Experiment

Context

Miles Taylor, author of “A Warning” by (Anonymous ) witnessed the devolution in the Trump administration.  Mostly driven from the top by the Trumpster. 

He says he doesn’t need to read to make informed decisions because he acts “with very little knowledge other than the knowledge I [already have]”.

Taylor found himself astonished at the president’s sheer level of intellectual laziness. 

And he wasn’t alone. 

Intelligence is one of those qualities that, if you insist you have it, you probably don’t — which is a polite way of putting it. 

Behind closed doors his own top officials deride him as an “idiot” and a “moron” with the understanding of a “fifth or sixth grader.” People normally tack a string of expletives onto the front and back ends of their assessments.

Taylor’s title — A Warning — adds fuel to the fire raging in us, citizens feeling our constitutional democracy will come to an end if Trump is re-elected in 2024, or maybe worse, if he isn’t, given his behavior so well documented.

One core question we voters have to take seriously is he willing and able to change? Consider Taylor’s observations:

      • He has a juvenile view of complex subjects
      • Normal people who spend any time with him feel uncomfortable
      • He stumbles, slurs, gets confused, is easily irritated, and has trouble synthesizing information … with regularity and
      • He can’t remember what he’s said or been told.

In short Trump flunks Cicero’s “fake news” test — “it is dishonorable to stumble ignorantly when it comes to the facts and to be deceived.”

But the beat goes on starting before he was elected.  

He was a regular booster of Alex Jones.  Trump was also one of the most visible adherents of “birtherism,”

Was there a conspiracy theory he didn’t spread? Trump said:

      • Senator Ted Cruz’s dad was involved in the Kennedy assassination,
      • Justice Antonin Scalia may have been murdered, and
      • Vaccines cause autism.

The point is, Trump “doesn’t care if the person spewing them is a fraud, as long as their words serve whatever purpose Trump has.”

Taylor says he goes to bed with Lou Dobbs. a once-respected Fox host, whose late-night show is now riddled with conspiracy theories.

He falls asleep with Dobbs’ ideas floating in his head and regularly brings them to the Oval Office demanding they be implemented the way Lou said they should be.

He’s comfortable being a huckster of half-truths. He spends a lot of time talking to staff about perceived injustices. He will send White House aides on an endless quest to “fix it.”

Begrudgingly you may have to acknowledge his genius — an evil genius — for giving nicknames to his targets as a tactic allowing the president to turn attacks into instant memes. “He road tests the insulting monikers with friends.”

There are no two ways about it. Trump is a bully, explains Taylor.

Trump’s past is rife with allegations of stiffed contractors, unpaid employees, broken agreements, involved in more than 3,500 lawsuits over the span of three decades, included claims by individuals who said he and his companies failed to pay them.

Hardly a day goes by without revealing evidence that Trump is “… a vindictive and self-promoting person, one who spends inordinate time attacking others to advance his interests.”

The president’s modus operandi emphasizes combat over peacemaking, bullying over negotiating, malice over clemency, and recognition over true generosity. His philanthropic history is full of empty words and questionable practices.

Take the Trump Foundation which fits into the shady side of evil genius.

Rather than fund it himself, he solicited outside donors. Why?  It allowed him to write checks with his name on them without diminishing his own wealth.

But, the state investigation in New York accused it of “a shocking pattern of illegality,” little more than a checkbook to serve Trump’s business and political interests.

Exhibit A? 

He used $10,000 in money from his charity to buy a six-foot oil portrait of himself. So much for the spirit of giving.

What happens when you compare Trump to Cicero’s standards? 

A courageous person includes resistance to the mob mentality, avoidance of obsession with money and pleasure, and stability through crises.

Our tweeter in chief survives on a diet of “likes” and “retweets” craving  high approval ratings which Taylor points out is ironic, because he does so little to deserve them.

Polls and polling to him are demonstrations of loyalty, not scientific measures of the country’s mood. When faced with tough challenges, he becomes unglued and bombastic.

Trump is not brave, nor unswayed by the crowd, nor uncommanded by money and pleasure, nor stable through crises. 

“Trump fuels rather than avoids mob behavior,” and that should give everyone pause.

Evidence

“4”  Steve Zahn, 51: “Taste is simply a matter of knowing what you genuinely like and why. Forget about what’s popular, what will sell or any other social concern and get deeply in touch with your own preferences.” Scorpio

I see how this goes.  A constant reminder for that one side of me that ignores which stories I curate because some fictional audience member might not like it, to keep it up.  And there’s that rationalization for not gaining follower and viewer analytics that my Myers Briggs Temperament Indicator profile, INTP, accounts for less than 5% of all types which extrapolates to disappointing 95% of people who stumble upon my work. 

Or, holding up as my hero Leonardo da Vinci for finishing far fewer of his promised projects to his patrons, because he caved in to his infinite curiosity as documented in his sketches and notes.  

Or, Aldwyth as my heroine, who personifies living life as an artist and actually works and lives in her studio.  I want to capture some of the commentary about her for a companion to Joseph Chilton Pearce’s explanation with her concrete examples.  Art for art sake and her finished, and multi-year projects yet unfinished work that totally engages her.

Random ones that make me want change my sign.

“4”  Steve Greene, 34; Steve Guttenberg, 61; Stephen King, 72: “You’ll get the chance to show what you’ve been up to and get some constructive feedback. If others seem surprised by your work, it’s just because you’ve been doing it so quietly. They had no idea what to expect from you.” Virgo

Really?  When?  How should I position what I’ve been up to?  The fourth season of a natural experiment?

“4”  Steve Aoki, 41; Steven Spielberg, 74: “One way you can tell a true friend: If it’s important to you, it’s important to your friend. If you feel free to share on subjects in which your friend has no other interest except that it matters to you, you’ve found a keeper.” Sagittarius

Don’t you think that this harder or becoming more difficult, because people who used to feel the same way as you and who would just rift with you in a jazz kind of way may have suddenly lost their senses when it came to polarizing politics?

“3”  Steve Harvey, 62; Stephan Patis, 53;  Stephen Hawking (1943 – 2018): “It doesn’t matter how fast you go as long as it’s the right direction, which is to say, forward. Sometimes forward looks like falling down. It always involves getting up again. Things don’t have to be smooth to be right.” Capricorn 

Sure, forward moving is how you want to fall instead of springing back.

“4”  Steve Nash, 45: “You’ve a unique perspective but you don’t realize what it is yet. You can’t find out by asking others. Go inside yourself and direct your questions to your own heart.” Aquarius 

Are you certain?  Haven’t I spent way too much time going inside of myself?  

“5” Steve Jobs, (1955 – 2011): “Don’t leave a situation before the agreed upon ending. It takes patience to hang in for the last bits because your mind will be racing ahead to the next thing, but just hang in there.” Pisces

One of the hallmarks of INTPs and most introverts is patience — or maybe better stated as processing time.  Our brains aren’t wired like extroverts.  We need quiet time to recharge our batteries.  But, yes just like Leo da V I feel my mind racing ahead before I keep the agreement with myself.

Today’s Holiday Theme: 

Many cosmologists believe that over 13 billion years ago, the entire universe was condensed into a space smaller than a dust speck. How we’ve grown … an emotion, an appetite and a point of ignition … Something as small as an idea will set off an expansive chain of events.

What’s Going On

Literally Bottled and Set Adrift from KnowWhere Atoll

    • @KnowLabs suite of 36 digital magazines, according to my analytics, grew from 12458 this week to 12559 organically grown followers.
    • Orange County Beach Towns 212 viewers stopped by the week before.

Foresight

Quality-of-Life

Long-Form

    • “Here, Right Matters: An American Story” by Alexander Vindman. “We’d long been confused by the president’s policy of accommodation and appeasement of Russia, the United States’ most pressing major adversary. Russia’s president Vladimir Putin invaded Ukraine, seizing the Crimean Peninsula, attacking its industrial heartland, the Donbass, from the capital, Kyiv. By 2019, little had changed, Russian military and security forces and their proxy separatists continued to occupy the Donbass. The biggest change was to Ukraine’s importance as a bulwark against Russian aggression weeks earlier, the White House had abruptly put a hold on nearly four hundred million dollars.” 
    • David Enrich begins his book with a suicide in “Deutsche Bank Dark Towers: Deutsche Bank, Donald Trump, and an Epic Trail of Destruction” and then meticulously details the bank’s Russian money laundering operations. Deutsche’s Russian business surged after revenues had fallen 50% due to the 2008 financial crisis. Putin’s Russia, poured in to Deutsche from deals it did with VTB Bank, linked to the Kremlin’s intelligence apparatus. Deutsche positioned itself as a crucial cog in “The Laundromat” by doing what couldn’t be done — processing cross-border transactions for banks that were too small  and didn’t have offices outside their home countries.
    • “Unthinkable: Trauma, Truth, and the Trials of American Democracy” by Jamie Raskin recalls one tragedy no parent should endure — the suicide of his son — and then a second tragedy at almost the same time — the insurrection on January 6th 2021, that terrified he and his congressional peers who were tasked by the Constitution to routinely oversee the orderly transfer of power from one former president to the duly elected new President. 
    • “A Warning” by Anonymous (Miles Taylor) written prior to the January 6th Insurrection as an insider’s account documenting how frequently the former President’s behavior and rage without any “guard rails” showed just how far he would go to win the next election at any cost while spinning lies and misinformation on top of each other.  

Image Credit: Wikimedia Commons

Inspired by Holiday Mathis – Creators Syndicate

CENTER FOR KNOWLEDGE CREATION AND INNOVATION

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S2 E52 — What’s So Wrong with Conventional Wisdom Unless …

… We’re in for a period of applying intelligence, indulging curiosity, playing around with different perspectives and taking part in extraordinary discussions that could only happen at this historic moment.

Steve Carell, 57; Steve Martin, 74; Steve Wozniak, 69: Creativity can only be accessed in the present. To obsess about the future or ruminate about the past isn’t creative. Those behaviors can be useful, but a very small dose goes a long way.”  Leo

Hi and welcome to Sunday’s Episode 52 in Season 2 of  “My Pandemic Year Experiment” on this 24th day of May in the spring of 2020.  

The Tau of Steves: What You Don’t Know Could Fill a Book

Table of Contents

Season One and Two are a two-year examination of how bits of wisdom changed during the “normal” pre-pandemic and then in this unfolding pandemic year.

Previously in Season Two, the Pandemic Year

S2 E51Let’s Agree to Make Things Worse, Shall We?; S2 E505 Fundamental Uncertainties; S2 E49Navigating Waves of Disruption When You’ve Lost Your Bearings

Related from Season One, the Normal Year

S1 E52Missing Chapters and Paths Not Taken; S1 E51Brief, Broad, Fast, Wow and Delight; S1 E50The Bias Brothers or Just Plain Losers?; S1 E49Magnetize the Version You Imagine

Context

Can you predict the future?  Hell, no!  Does that stop anyone from trying, well not everyone, right?  In very uncertain times like these what we need I believe is scenario thinking instead. With it we can creatively prepare for and clarify potential risks when we choose a path forward.

And, that my friends is why I’m continuing my series drawing upon the report from Deloitte and Salesforce’s “The world remade by COVID-19 Scenarios for resilient leaders | 3-5 years.”

Why am I a big fan of scenarios — other than they are just so much fun to flesh out? 

Scenarios are stories about what the future may be like, created through a structured process  to stretch thinking, challenge conventional wisdom, and drive better decisions today. They are not predictions about what will happen. They are hypotheses about what could happen, designed to open our eyes to new opportunities or hidden risks. 

Here’s what they and we are after — trying to get our heads around what kinds of changes can we expect as we invest our livelihoods and embrace our social isolation sacrifices through a novel global uncertainty.

The good folks at Deloitte and Salesforce encourage us to challenge our assumptions.  

imagine how the things you were sure would happen could now be on a different course. Avoid the temptation to conclude that the crisis will accelerate the changes you already expected or believed were inevitable. 

Here’s an 8-step process of strategic exploration I normally follow. We’re now on step 4.

    1. State the specific decision to be made —to answer the question we’ve all been asking ourselves, what will have changed as a result of what’s happening to us right now.
    2. Identify the major environmental forces impacting the decision —the team identified 19 uncertainties and 5 critical uncertainties with two dimensions along which 2 critical uncertainties will drive the overall impact.
    3. Develop four plausible and qualitatively different possibilities for each force — 1.  The Passing Storm, 2. Good Company, 3. Sunrise in the East and 4. Lone Wolves.
    4. Assemble the alternatives for each force into internally consistent stories

Here’s how Deloitte and Salesforce summarized 5 critical forces playing out in each of 4 scenarios to assemble those forces into internally consistent stories. 

    1. Social cohesion rises with a heightened appreciation for interpersonal and familial relationships (Passing Storm); is maintained as society shifts to become more “purpose-driven” (Good Company); shifts to an increased emphasis on the “good of the whole” (Sunrise in the East); and falls, as xenophobia and suspicion of others become the norm (Lone Wolves).
    2. Technology advances stay on course as previous holdouts move online (Passing Storm); take center stage with large companies driving solutions in areas such as health tech and biotech (Good Company); are accelerated as more data-sharing allows for advances in AI and other advanced tech capabilities (Sunrise in the East); and are divergent among different markets, with a focus on advances in surveillance and control measures (Lone Wolves)
    3. Worldwide economies enter an extended recession with increased income inequality (Passing Storm); are disrupted with a growing concentration of power among large companies (Good Company); shrink due to the prolonged nature of the virus (Sunrise in the East); and are left in turmoil as global supply chains are disrupted (Lone Wolves)
    4. Focus on climate change is renewed as global collaboration provides hope for progress (Passing Storm); is mixed with some sustainability-minded companies investing in renewable energy (Good Company); is deemphasized as economic recovery is prioritized (Sunrise in the East); and declines as countries shift toward energy independence (Lone Wolves)
    5. Governments around the world gain trust and international organizations such as WHO grow in relevance (Passing Storm); partner with large corporations, who step up as part of the solution (Good Company); look to the east for guidance, as Asian countries effectively manage the virus (Sunrise in the East); and adopt isolationism as they attempt to contain the virus within (Lone Wolves)

Evidence

“4”  Steve Zahn, 51: “Because you have big plans, you can’t afford to wait for inspiration. You’ll simply show up and work whether you feel motivated or not. Inspiration will kick in eventually.” Scorpio

So I feel this almost every day.  Waiting for inspiration only means staring at a blank screen for far too long.  Two activities usually work for me.  The first I start the morning with, even before the first cup — scrolling through all the Apple News feeds I search to curate the days stories @Knowlabs. 

Something triggers an inspiration or a loose (at 5:30 am) connection for one of my passion projects.  The other is this habit on Thursdays through Fridays of curating TauBits of Wisdom because it stretches me to twist it somehow into what I want to say.

Random ones that make me want change my sign.

Today’s Holiday Birthday:  

A lucrative wave of business occurs as your interests meld with the common interest and you provide a valuable service. Years of experience suddenly add up to well-deserved mastery. Smooth will be the road of relationships and smoother still will be your approach to getting into and out of them as the case may be.

I can only wish for two reasons.  I’m not seeing it and because this ain’t my birthday.  If it’s your’s Happy Birthday and enjoy your well-deserved mastery and smooth relationships.

“5”  Steve Carell, 57; Steve Martin, 74; Steve Wozniak, 69: Creativity can only be accessed in the present. To obsess about the future or ruminate about the past isn’t creative. Those behaviors can be useful, but a very small dose goes a long way.”  Leo

Amen brother Steves.  Rumination and obsession lead to a road of ruin — or at least blocked creativity.  Switch gears and close your favorite screen. 

“3”  Steve Kerr, 54:No one is entirely to blame for the situation they are in, but everyone is entirely responsible for their own situation. You’ll get the help you need and give the help that is needed in the name of improvement.” Libra

I almost passed on selecting Steve’s, until I realized we individually didn’t start the fire of COVID-19 burning out of control, but we can get vaccinated when it’s an option and we can wear our masks.

“4”  Steve Harvey, 62:You’ll have an excellent sense of where to focus, and it only gets better as the day progresses. At the end of the day, you’ll feel like you spent your energy on all the right things.  Capricorn

I know it’s really tough to know where to focus right now.  I only hope presenting this Deloitte and Salesforce report will make things a little easier and that makes me feel I’ve spent today’s energy on the right things, then.

“5” Steve Nash, 45:You will become aware of something you have been, until now, only unconsciously aware of. This is big. “Ah-ha” moments don’t come with fireworks. Nonetheless, they change everything.  Aquarius

When I’m not, my other trick is to ask, “What would Leo da V do?” to give me permission to procrastinate like a Renaissance Master and free associate like a dog on a walk who abruptly takes off with the first sniff of squirrel no matter what the destination was supposed to be.

The Holiday Forecast for the Week Ahead:  

… suggests we (shouldn’t) be quick to land on conclusions, definitions or labels. It’s not the moment to listen to uneducated opinions or even educated ones. Messes could very well become successes and vice versa, and it’s too soon to tell how the chips will fall. Time will tell, and anyone who tries to preempt time’s decree will later have to content with their own bad taste while eating their words. … we’re in for a period of applying intelligence, indulging curiosity, playing around with different perspectives and taking part in extraordinary discussions that could only happen at this historic moment. Set out to have fun, or better yet to be the fun. Above all, don’t take yourself too seriously, as that would only ruin the magic. The lighter a heart is, the higher it can fly.

What’s Going On

Literally Bottled and Set Adrift from KnowWhere Atoll 

    • @knowlabs followers of one or more of my 35 digital magazines grew from 2663 to 2839.

Foresight

Quality-of-Life 

Long-Form

    • Saw the movie, didn’t realize that one of my favorite authors, Michael Connelly — his detective Hieronymus (Harry) Bosch book series and Amazon Prime series — also wrote, “The Lincoln Lawyer” which I just finished. Gotta tell you I can’t not see his lead character (Mickey Haller, Bosch’s half brother) as anyone else but Matthew McConaughey. 

Image Credit: Wikimedia Commons

Inspired by: Holiday Mathis – Creators Syndicate

CENTER FOR KNOWLEDGE CREATION AND INNOVATION

The Knowledge Path | Know Laboratories | Knowledge Banking | Knowledge ATMs | Western Skies and Island Currents | Best West Road Trip

S3 E27 — What the World Needs Now Before It’s Too Late

And, it’s part one of our segment we call “Listen Up Expectant Mothers” when we ask: What do expectant mothers wish for their about-to-be newborns?  

The Tau of Steves: What You Don’t Know Could Fill a Book

“5”  Steve Greene, 34; Steve Guttenberg, 61:Maybe it is not your purpose to incite curiosity and show people less obvious truths, but that is the natural result of your devotion to a meaningful interest that, in some way, pertains to us all.” Virgo

Hi and welcome to Sunday’s Episode 27 in Season 3 of  My Paradoxically Normal Year” on this 11th day of April in the spring of 2021 — which is a three-year examination of how bits of wisdom changed during the “normal” pre-pandemic year and then in the pandemic year, and now months after.

Previously from Season Three, the Paradoxically Normal Year

S3 E26Following Alice Down the Rabbit Hole; S3 E25 Art Lives Upon Discussion, Upon Experiment, Upon Curiosity …;  S3 E24Reunion on the Edge of the Pacific Ocean near Legoland? Hell Yeah!

Related from Season Two, The Pandemic Year

S2 E27Why I Have to Keep Leo da V on a Leash and So Should You; S2 E26Rethinking the N-Word; S2 E25Are You an Innie or Outie Thinker?; S2 E24Working Remote from KnowWhere Atoll

Related from Season One, The Normal Year

S1 E27Day 27 of My 1-Year Experiment; S1 E26Day 26  of My 1-Year Experiment; S1 E25Day 25 of My 1-Year Experiment; S1 E24Day 24 of My 1-Year Experiment

Context

And, it’s part one of our segment we call “Listen Up Expectant Mothers” when we ask: What do expectant mothers wish for their about-to-be newborns?  

Short answer is to listen to Rascal Flat’s “My Wish” and Rod Stewart’s “Forever Young” and read on.

Like Tau, we have the Greeks to thank for our name, Steve. 

As you recall, Tau in ancient times was used as a symbol for life or resurrection, whereas the eighth letter of the Greek alphabet, theta, was considered the symbol of death.

Here’s the pitch for bringing more Steves into the world!

Stephen comes from Greeks, according to Wikipedia: 

From the Latin Stephanus, which is from the Greek Stephanos, a name derived from stephanos (a crown, a garland). 

The name is borne in the Bible by St Stephen, one of the seven chosen to assist the apostles, and the first Christian martyr. 

Var: Stefan, Stefen, Stefon, Stephan, Stephon, Stevan, Steven, Stevon. Short: Steve.

Stephen or Steven is a common English first name. It is particularly significant to Christians, as it belonged to Saint Stephen an early disciple and deacon who, according to the Book of Acts, was stoned to death; 

he is widely regarded as the first martyr (or “protomartyr“) of the Christian Church. 

The name “Stephen” (and its common variant “Steven”) is derived from Greek Στέφανος (Stéphanos), a first name from the Greek word στέφανος (stéphanos), meaning “wreath, crown” and by extension “reward, honor, renown, fame”, from the verb στέφειν (stéphein), “to encircle, to wreathe”.

In Ancient Greece, crowning wreaths (such as laurel wreaths) were given to the winners of contests. 

Originally, as the verb suggests, the noun had a more general meaning of any “circle”—including a circle of people, a circling wall around a city, and, in its earliest recorded use, the circle of a fight, which is found in the Iliad of Homer.

Now comes the gut wrenching news:  

In the United Kingdom, it peaked during the 1950s and 1960s as one of the top ten male first names (ranking third in 1954) but had fallen to twentieth by 1984 and had fallen out of the top one hundred by 2002. 

The name was ranked 201 in the United States in 2009, according to the Social Security Administration. 

The name reached its peak popularity in 1951 but remained very common through the mid-1990s, when popularity started to decrease in the United States.

Not quite as bad as what togetherness means for us during the Pandemic year(s), but still sad.  

Evidence

You could say unless our luck and fortune change we’ll remain on the endangered list on a path “going places” to extinction.  

Random ones that make me want change my sign.

Honestly, Today’s Birthday sucked.  You’ll just have to take my word on it.

From Saturday, but setting up today’s fresh start:

Navigating is a lot easier when you know where you are. Without that information, the map may as well be just a random pretty picture. Getting places is simple: Know where you are, determine where you want to be, and then solve for the difference. 

All together now, but wanting to escape — no not from you Emma the Baroness — let’s turn our fortune to the week ahead, and shop — Emma the Baroness — for more bargains heading our way humming and skipping with beginner’s luck.

Holiday Forecast for the Week Ahead: 

It’s a welcome placement for many, signifying the following turns of fortune: Coveted things become accessible. Unaffordable things become affordable either because the price goes down or the spending money goes up.”

So, if I’m getting this right, Steve, your Holiday Tau says I’m good at navigating, maybe through this whitewater rafting thing we call life because I have GPS and can solve for the difference?  It’s the process, not the glory.

“4”  Steve Howey, 42:You’ll make a proactive and deliberate attempt to achieve an aim that is not achieved by most people. It’s nice when this gets noticed today, but honestly, you’re doing it for the challenge, not the glory.  Cancer

Haha.  What if it is my purpose, G&G to curious-up for some truth revealing?  Is your Holiday Tau just as meaningful?

“5”  Steve Greene, 34; Steve Guttenberg, 61:Maybe it is not your purpose to incite curiosity and show people less obvious truths, but that is the natural result of your devotion to a meaningful interest that, in some way, pertains to us all.” Virgo

Hi Steve.  Does your TauBit of Wisdom have anything to do with Tau — which is 2pi?  Making it easier and more elegant for solving geometric problems? Nope? Didn’t think so.

“4”  Steve Harvey, 62: “The people you’ll deal with aren’t entirely rational. You understand them anyway because neither are you. Also, there’s a good chance that the seemingly illogical equation figures out perfectly on deeper levels.” Capricorn

What’s Going On

Literally Bottled and Set Adrift from KnowWhere Atoll 

    • @KnowLabs suite of digital magazines jumps from 7816 to 7930 organically grown followers

Foresight

Quality-of-Life 

Long-Form

    • “Consilience: The Unity of Knowledge” by E.O. Wilson, an entomologist who studied colonies of ants for their insights.  But didn’t stop there, according to The Wall Street Journal, “A dazzling journey across the sciences and humanities in search of deep laws to unite them.” 
    • “True Believers,” the novel by Kurt Andersen (which seems to precede Fantasyland)? I like how he goes back and forth from now to the ‘60s in which the main character is writing a memoir, but needs “Okays” from her friends who had been hiding a secret for 40+ years that could ruin their careers?  Like, what’s my equivalent? “Disappearing Through the Skylight” by O.B. Hardison, Jr. which proceeded “Consilience” by a decade.  Hardison’s been described as a polymathic renaissance man who wrote, “… Nature has slipped, perhaps finally beyond our field of vision.”  What does it mean for “… science, history, art and architecture, music, language, ultimately, for humanity”? This one provides missing chunks of understanding where we came from and where we’re going.

Image Credit: Wikimedia Commons

Inspired by: Holiday Mathis – Creators Syndicate

CENTER FOR KNOWLEDGE CREATION AND INNOVATION

The Knowledge Path | Know Laboratories | Knowledge Banking | Knowledge ATMs | Western Skies and Island Currents | Best West Road Trips

S2 E40 — The Profound Impact of the Pandemic on Nouns

What do you mean when you say you curate nouns? That’s just plain weird.  What’s the point? It’s how they are interdependent that interests me.  How one, two or three react together in a positive or negative spiral.

The Tau of Steves: What You Don’t Know Could Fill a Book

“5”  Steve Howey, 42:Change is necessary, and you feel driven to break up the monotony but only to a certain degree. Too much novelty is destabilizing, so you’ll seek just the right amount of excitement.” Cancer

Hi and welcome to Sunday’s Episode 40 in Season 2 of  “My Pandemic Year Experiment” on this 3rd day of May in the spring of 2020. 

Season One and Two are a two-year examination of how bits of wisdom changed during the “normal” pre-pandemic and then in this unfolding pandemic year.

Previously in Season Two, the Pandemic Year

S2 E39The Best Tau for the Pandemic Year, Don’t You Agree?; S2 E38What Should You Do If You Stumble Across Loaded Information?; S2 E37How Deep is the Chasm? What Do We Do? 

Related from Season One, the Normal Year

S1 E40Nothing to See Here, Keep Moving On; S1 E39What’s Up with Facebook?; S1 E3838 of My 1-Year Experiment; S1 E37Day 37 of My 1-Year Experiment

Context

Today, in response to the unfolding pandemic and the consequences we face I’m revisiting content I want to cover.

Introduction

Yeah, I should say nouns come in all kinds of shapes and sizes, but I’m only interested in tying people, places, things, ideas, information and trends together in new and original ways.”

It’s how they are interdependent that interests me.  How one, two or three react together in a positive or negative spiral.  

People.  

What do people do?  They live. They love. They work. They play. They invest. They leave a legacy. They navigate  their own lifecycle:  birth, childhood, adolescence, marriage, career, retirement, death.

Places. 

They evolve slowly.  They come in urban and rural geographies and densities.  

Organizations. 

Navigating stages: Start up, Emerging Growth, Rapid Growth, Sustained Growth, Maturity, Decline and Reinvention. 

Things. 

They come in too many variations. And, at an ever accelerating pace.

Ideas. 

They are received and shared through bubbles, bias and rampant gullibility.

Information. 

Noise and Data. Wisdom and Transformations. Ecosystem of conspiracies filled with misinformation, disinformation and useless information.

Trends. 

Fads explode and then fade. Generations latch on to some. Technology drives others.  Influencers sneeze and infect fads and fashions. Paradigms usher in sets of trends at unconscious levels.

Evidence

Holiday Forecast for the Week Ahead:  

Social influence happens every moment of every day whether you’re with people or not. 

Even if you’re alone and not consuming mainstream media or social media, the social influence is still present — in language, the design of a living space, the items around you that were made by others, the way you get your food. 

It’s inescapable. On a day-to-day basis, we operate largely unaware of the extent of our wider social bonds and roles.

This is what makes it absolutely essential to notice our participation in the hive mind and wake up to our individual thought processes to whatever extent we can.

“4”  Steve Zahn: “You’ll be in the grip of conflicting tensions, and though this is a little uncomfortable, there’s something terribly interesting, creative and romantic about it, too.” Scorpio

Yeah, I have so much content.  Too much.  Just wrangling it into something digestible for readers and followers requires time and energy and concentration to pull off.  And then it becomes OBE — overtaken by events.  This damn coronavirus.

Random ones that make me want change my sign.

“3”  Steve McQueen (1930 – 1980): Success won’t come from doing anything too grand. It just comes from doing what you say you’re going to do. Promise small and deliver on it, and you’ll win the day.” Aries

Boy was this a hard lesson to learn.  I always tended to underestimate how long tasks would take on a project plan while working with organization clients.  I ended up eating a lot of my fees, because I over promised and barely made deadlines.  

“4”  Steve Winwood, 71; Stevie Wonder, 69: You’ll get specific about what you want and need, because the typical answers are so ubiquitous that they no longer mean anything to you. What would be good for you is different from what would be good for someone else.  Taurus

Oh, and I’m easily distractible flying off into seductive curiosities like a dog picking up the scent of a squirrel and ripping the leash out of a dog walker’s hand to give chase.  As an INTP (Myers-Briggs Temperament Indicator) I realize there only about 3 to 5% of us — so yes, we are different and crave unique nuts to squirrel away. 

“3”  Steve Smith, 30: Imperfection and flaws are part of the deal. The better you are at living with things you don’t like without giving them too much of your attention, the more time you’ll have to do something great.”Gemini

Isn’t that the Zen principle of detachment?  Let those imperfections and flaws flow through your consciousness to let go of them.  You don’t want to become a victim of how we described some engineers 

“5”  Steve Howey, 42:Change is necessary, and you feel driven to break up the monotony but only to a certain degree. Too much novelty is destabilizing, so you’ll seek just the right amount of excitement.” Cancer

The key is to define “certain degree” and most often the you know it when you feel it.  We only have so much energy we can expend towards disruptive change thrown at us. But, like exercise, controlling the novelty you seek helps create the stamina and resilience required to thrive.

“4”  Steve Carrell, 57; Steve Martin, 74; Steve Wozniak, 69: The significance of committing to one thing is that you are also giving up your option of doing the other things. What comes without sacrifice quickly becomes worthless.” Leo

But what about all those other squirrel projects?  Isn’t that called concurrent program management or at least multi-tasking?  

“4”  Steve Greene, 34; Steve Guttenberg, 61:Committing to your own growth will mean doing things that don’t necessarily come easily to you, but that doesn’t mean they have to be very hard, either. Small changes will add up.” Virgo

That’s what I’m talking about.  The compound interest strengthens our resilience — the capacity to adapt or adopt new changes in our habits.

“4”  Steve Aoki, 41: Your ability to compartmentalize will allow you to do incredible things. There are times when you take your ability to focus on the task at hand for as long as it takes to accomplish it as a given.” Sagittarius

And, I’d say that time is just about up.

What’s Going On

Literally Bottled and Set Adrift from KnowWhere Atoll 

    • @knowlabs followers of one or more of my 35 digital magazines grew from 1760 to 2,170.

Foresight

Quality-of-Life

Long-Form

    • Just picked up “Bob Dylan In America” by Sean Wilentz.  Maybe because of the subliminal messaging like the times are a changing and the answer is blowing in the wind, but I kinda like Sean’s fanboy becomes music critic becomes historian surrounding Dylan’s life and times.

Image Credit: Wikimedia Commons

Inspired by: Holiday Mathis – Creators Syndicate

CENTER FOR KNOWLEDGE CREATION AND INNOVATION

The Knowledge Path | Know Laboratories | Knowledge Banking | Knowledge ATMs | Western Skies and Island Currents | Best West Road Trip

S3 E25 — Art Lives Upon Discussion, Upon Experiment, Upon Curiosity …

And why wouldn’t you feel happy, it’s Friday, after all.  You might have missed the outline for writing up my 1-year natural experiment last Friday.  Today the squirrels come home to roost, as Leo da V whispers to my inner ear, as if I’m a dog on the scent of drafting the report.

The Tau of Steves: What You Don’t Know Could Fill a Book

“5”  Steve Winwood, 71; Stevie Wonder, 69; Stephen Colbert, 56: “Treat your mind by feeding it the stories and equations, art and movement that gets the mental wheels whirring. Your receptive synapses will spark with brilliant ideas.”  Taurus

Hi and welcome to Friday’s Episode 25 in Season 3 of  My Paradoxically Normal Year” on this 9th day of April in the spring of 2021 — which is a three-year examination of how bits of wisdom changed during the “normal” pre-pandemic year and then in the pandemic year, and now months after.

Previously from Season Three, the Paradoxically Normal Year

S3 E24Reunion on the Edge of the Pacific Ocean near Legoland? Hell Yeah!; S3 E23Free from the Pile of Rubble in Your Brain; S3 E22What’s the Experiment Got To Do with the Exodus from Barb’s Bunny Ranch?

Related from Season Two, The Pandemic Year

S2 E25Are You an Innie or Outie Thinker?; S2 E24Working Remote from KnowWhere Atoll; S2 E23Gaping Loss No Amount of Mourning Will Heal; S2 E22Paranoid Rose Review and Traffic-Copped Check Out Lines

Related from Season One, The Normal Year

S1 E25Day 25 of My 1-Year Experiment; S1 E24Day 24 of My 1-Year Experiment; S1 E23Day 23 of My 1-Year Experiment; S1 E22Day 22 of My 1-Year Experiment

Context

Oh, and as a muse Leo’s not providing any answers, just endless questions attacking my self-confidence like wondering: 

Which came first the report or the Daily TauBits for the Taking?  

Does it appear at some point in the stream flowing towards wisdom?  After? 

Or is it described each day warts and all, or only the “5’s” included in the body of the report? 

Is the report a knowledge product offered as a separate manuscript?  Separate from the process now of going back and publishing the beginning days?  

Or will that process reveal the answer to Leo’s questions?   

I mean from a year timeline you can’t have a report until the experiment is finished, right?

Shut up Leo.  I’m sniffing out my introduction.

As a life-story writer I’m intrigued with living life as an art form in a natural experiment. About how we navigate through every day life weighing facts, yet making actual decisions based on our best intuition and logic.  How our brains work.  And finally passing TauBits of Wisdom on to others who find me but, mostly to my heirs who neglect my freely given advice. 

And, as a vehicle for returning to my first career. After earning a Masters Degree in experimental and clinical psychology and when I left off researching how two hemispheres of the brain inform our different selves — now that I’ve completed other careers. 

All of my careers shared a common theme tying people, places, things, ideas, information and trends together in new and original ways. You know, the real work of an idea packager steeped in teasing out patterns from trends or forecasts from data-driven or non-linear sources.

Art lives upon discussion, upon experiment, upon curiosity, upon variety of attempts, upon the exchange of views and the comparison of standpoints.— Henry James

I’m documenting my natural experiments in a way that could be repeated in a pre-pandemic, pandemic and post-pandemic world.

It’s a start.

Evidence

However comma, Emma the Baroness and I feel disappointed that our legitimate Holiday Tau just didn’t measure up today.

Random ones that make me want change my sign.

That just means we’ll shop around until we find something more suitable.  Don’t you wish today is your birthday and you get all those animated balloons flying up up and away in your iPhone from well-wishing text-ers?  Me neither.  However comma we should check back in time for summer money and each of the seven milestones.

Today’s Holiday Birthday: 

As for the long-term goal you’re devoted to, you’ll reach seven important milestones within the year. You will thrive in a community that assembles around you as you share what you love. There’s a method you’ll follow to money in the summer. Perfect the system and make it your own.

Patron Saint Time …  Hmm …  Your Holiday Tau certainly weighs in with a lot of sense.  Something to consider as the pandemic restrictions lift and we can grab a Starbucks at a table and just catch up.

“4”  Steve McQueen (1930 – 1980): You’ll hit it off with new people. Don’t be afraid to be the first to call and establish a relationship beyond the original circumstance that brought you together.” Aries 

So it’t not just because of the variations in how you refer to yourself — Steve, Stevie, and Stephen — all names attached to me over my life so far, I resonate more deeply with your TauBit of Wisdom for today’s passion project.  Ruff, Ruff …

“5”  Steve Winwood, 71; Stevie Wonder, 69; Stephen Colbert, 56: “Treat your mind by feeding it the stories and equations, art and movement that gets the mental wheels whirring. Your receptive synapses will spark with brilliant ideas.”  Taurus

Hey Aoki, are you in conspiracy with Leo da V? This is a project with steps I’m taking and tasks I’m executing and self-imposed deadlines I’m meeting, so there’s no time for beauty or birdsong or spring flowers blooming … or squirrels taunting me.

“4”  Steve Aoki, 41: “You’ve a gift for seeing the potential in things and getting excited about their development. It’s not that you want them to be otherwise though. Every stage has beauty in it. Don’t push or rush to results.” Sagittarius

Here’s my ask:  since you both exist on a plane somewhere in quantum cosmic time and Walter Isaacson wrote books about both of you exploring your life and genius ways can you do something to shut Leo da V up for me?  Wait. What? Yeah I’ve seen him interviewed on Stephen Colbert the other night about it too.  I’m number 10 on my library’s 1 Kindle copy of the “Code Breaker.” Damn it Leo!

“5”  Steve Jobs, (1955 – 2011): “You become quite aware of the energy flow — who adds to it, who sucks from it, and how things tend to unfold depending on who gets involved. Think of this as good data. Collect it and refrain from judgment.” Pisces

What’s Going On

Literally Bottled and Set Adrift from KnowWhere Atoll 

    • @KnowLabs suite of 36 digital magazines jumps from  7650 to 7742 this week organically grown followers

Foresight

Quality-of-Life 

Long-Form

    • “Consilience: The Unity of Knowledge” by E.O. Wilson, an entomologist who studied colonies of ants for their insights.  But didn’t stop there, according to The Wall Street Journal, “A dazzling journey across the sciences and humanities in search of deep laws to unite them.” 
    • “True Believers,” the novel by Kurt Andersen (which seems to precede Fantasyland)? I like how he goes back and forth from now to the ‘60s in which the main character is writing a memoir, but needs “Okays” from her friends who had been hiding a secret for 40+ years that could ruin their careers?  Like, what’s my equivalent? “Disappearing Through the Skylight” by O.B. Hardison, Jr. which proceeded “Consilience” by a decade.  Hardison’s been described as a polymathic renaissance man who wrote, “… Nature has slipped, perhaps finally beyond our field of vision.”  What does it mean for “… science, history, art and architecture, music, language, ultimately, for humanity”? This one provides missing chunks of understanding where we came from and where we’re going.

Image Credit: Wikimedia Commons

Inspired by: Holiday Mathis – Creators Syndicate

CENTER FOR KNOWLEDGE CREATION AND INNOVATION

The Knowledge Path | Know Laboratories | Knowledge Banking | Knowledge ATMs | Western Skies and Island Currents | Best West Road Trips

S2 E33 — What Happens When Your Business Collapses?

Feeling lost, I followed 5 why’s  to regain my bearings, ending with Patreon as the single focus for all my writing, as an income subscription model, as a tax expense for Schedule C and with a goal of attracting a target of 826 introverts out of 3526 acquaintances“views,” “likes,” “shares” and “followers.”

The Tau of Steves: What You Don’t Know Could Fill a Book

“3”  Steve McQueen (1930 – 1980): Trying to push something out of your mind is a sure way to drain your willpower quickly. You’ll have greater wells of self-control when you face what’s going on and create some if/then strategies.  Aries

Hi and welcome to Thursday’s Episode 33 of the Second Season’s  My Pandemic Year’s Natural Experiment, on April 23rd in the spring of 2020 here in California.

Previously in Season Two, the Pandemic Year

S2 E32Trapped and Bored? Or Unleashing a Reinvention Wave?; S2 E31Getting Charged from Box Automattic-aly; S2 E30It’s Crazy. Why does Amazon Prime Work, but Netflix Doesn’t? 

Related from Season One, the Normal Year

S1 E33Day 33 of My 1-Year Experiment; S1 E32Day 32 of My 1-Year Experiment; S1 E31Day 31 of My 1-Year Experiment; S1 E30Day 30 of My 1-Year Experiment

Context

It’s been a pretty mundane, Work-on-the-Business kind of day.

    • Resolved the problem of missing names floating somewhere between spreadsheets and the Contacts app on my computer.
    • Documented alphabetical blocks of names for my mass emails to proteges. 
    • Emailed A-L’s to my list of former Proteges as a test.

Feeling lost, I followed 5 why’s  to regain my bearings, ending with Patreon as the single focus for all my writing, as an income subscription model, as a tax expense for Schedule C and with a goal of attracting a target of 826 introverts out of 3526 acquaintances“views,” “likes,” “shares” and “followers.”

    1. Why? I needed 2000 fans to support my self-publishing. It’s a rule of thumb I’ve adopted as I’d been writing the Knowledge Path series, Volume One and publishing to my 6 websites as a way to attract fans.
    2. Why? I didn’t advertise or promote with SEO the published chapters on any of the website blogs. The only comments I received were SPAM messages that I didn’t allow on my pages.  
    3. Why? I didn’t have that many fans on any social media platform except my LinkedIn 1st degree network-audience. And a growing number of followers to my Flipboard digital magazines.  Adding both numbers up I got to over 2000.  But, like Sue D.  said one time when she posted to LinkedIn — where I received 400 to 500 views of Know Laboratory, Best West Road Trip and Western Skies & Island Currents — nobody visited her sites.  So even with Sumo forwarding potential followers to MailChimp lists, one to each of the 6 blogs, it didn’t work. 
    4. Why? My 36 Flipboard magazines only have 100 +/- followers, but when all of those are counted at the @knowlabs master level the total 1686 as of today.  All grown organically over time.  They can like, flip into their own magazines and follow.  On LinkedIn future trends summaries in a variety of formats drew more views than the places and vacation stories did.
    5. Why? I assumed that before I published and bundled Books 1 — 5 of the Knowledge Path Series on Apple Books as the path of least resistance by converting “Pages” chapter content I could entice Patreon supporters to pay $1, $3 and $5 a month to generate income now and in the future as evidence.

Evidence

From “Whys” to “Wise” we turn, hoping to find just the right TauBit of Wisdom to steal, so on to the Steves.

Random ones that make me want change my sign.

Yup.  I can’t tell you how much I’ve procrastinated this “Work-on-the-Business” chore. And, I’ve drained my energy and willpower as your Holiday Tau points out.

“3”  Steve McQueen (1930 – 1980): Trying to push something out of your mind is a sure way to drain your willpower quickly. You’ll have greater wells of self-control when you face what’s going on and create some if/then strategies.  Aries

I’m a believer CM&W, but it’s not what’s on my task focused brain today.

“2”  Steve Carell, 57; Steve Martin, 74; Steve Wozniak, 69: All people are both equal and unique and there was never a time when you believed otherwise. Money and status may change the power dynamics of a situation, but they don’t change the value of any person.” Leo

Yup, Aoki I’m a-okay with your Holiday Tau, but not today for the same reason I explained to CM&W.

“2”  Steve Aoki, 41: The ones who love you have already seen you through many incarnations in this lifetime and are happy with each different version that comes along. You afford the same grace to them.” Sagittarius

If only Coach Nash, I’m almost in the mood to swallow your Holiday Tau hook, line and sinker — but it wouldn’t be a very pleasant thing to actually do.

“2”  Steve Nash, 45:You are openhearted and curious. Once you decide what you want to do, you’ll quickly gather up everything you need to know to make it happen.  Aquarius

What’s Going On

Literally Bottled and Set Adrift from KnowWhere Atoll 

    • @knowlabs followers of one or more of my 35 digital magazines grew from 1628 to 1654.

Foresight

Quality-of-Life

Long-Form

    • Just picked up “Bob Dylan In America” by Sean Wilentz.  Maybe because of the subliminal messaging like the times are a changing and the answer is blowing in the wind, but I kinda like Sean’s fanboy becomes music critic becomes historian surrounding Dylan’s life and times.

Image Credit: Wikimedia Commons

Inspired by: Holiday Mathis – Creators Syndicate

CENTER FOR KNOWLEDGE CREATION AND INNOVATION

The Knowledge Path | Know Laboratories | Knowledge Banking | Knowledge ATMs | Western Skies and Island Currents | Best West Road Trip