S4 E28 — Why Do Those Who Know the Least Talk the Longest?

According to the plan, public pressure created by the delay would lead state legislatures in six key battleground states with Republican-dominated legislatures – Arizona, Michigan, Pennsylvania, Georgia, Wisconsin, Nevada – to de-certify election results, with the intended outcome that Trump would have more certified electoral college votes than the election’s actual winner, Joe Biden.

“5”  Steve Aoki, 41; Steven Spielberg, 74: “Why do those who know the least tend to talk the longest? Your observations may be brief by comparison, but they go right to the heart of the matter, so don’t hesitate to lead the way.” Sagittarius

Hi and welcome to Sunday’s 28th Episode in Season 4 of  Our Disruptively Resilient Year” on this 17th day of April in the spring of 2022.

We concluded the three-year examination of how bits of wisdom changed — during the “normal” pre-pandemic year compared to the pandemic year, and more recently to the paradoxically normal year. 

“The Tau of Steves: What You Don’t Know Could Fill a Book”

Table of Contents

Season Four continues now within domestic and global chaos.

Previously in Season Four, The Disruptively Resilient Year

S4 E27Who Cares If It’s The Right Thing To Do Anymore?; S4 E26What Happens If No One Asks a Question?; S4 E25Accountability? 

Related from Season Three, the Paradoxically Normal Year

S3 E28Why I Stole Your Daily Horoscope for a Year; S3 E27What the World Needs Now Before It’s Too Late; S3 E26Following Alice Down the Rabbit Hole; S3 E25 Art Lives Upon Discussion, Upon Experiment, Upon Curiosity …

Related from Season Two, the Pandemic Year

S2 E28Hosting Norwegian Zooms While Trump Eliminated the Virus in April; S2 E27Why I Have to Keep Leo da V on a Leash and So Should You; S2 E26Rethinking the N-Word; S2 E25Are You an Innie or Outie Thinker? 

Related from Season One, the Normal Year

S1 E28Day 28 of My 1-Year Experiment; S1 E27Day 27 of My 1-Year Experiment; S1 E26Day 26  of My 1-Year Experiment; S1 E25Day 25 of My 1-Year Experiment

Context

After Joe Biden won, Former President Donald Trump refused to concede and Peter Navarro jumped into action working on plans to overturn the legal results of the 2020 election.

    • He and Steve Bannon coordinated the details naming the scheme, “The Green Bay Sweep” involving more than 100 Republican state legislators. 
    • Navarro published the plot in a November 2021 book and then hit a talking head tour speaking about it in multiple media interviews. 

Invoking Lombardi’s Packers

It took its name from the Packers sweep, where the Green Bay Packers of the 1950s and ’60s, led by Vince Lombardi, would flood a zone with blockers, allowing the football to be advanced dependably behind them. 

According to sources cited in Wikipedia:

    • In the political iteration, devised by Steve Bannon, the Electoral College vote count would be blocked by repeated challenges to various state’s vote counts by Republican members of the House and Senate favorable to Donald Trump. 
    • Each challenge could take up to two hours of debate by each chamber, individually, leading to as much of 24 hours of televised hearings.
    • According to the plan, public pressure created by the delay would lead state legislatures in six key battleground states with Republican-dominated legislatures – Arizona, Michigan, Pennsylvania, Georgia, Wisconsin, Nevada – to de-certify election results.

100 Congressman on the Wall, if 1 of Them Happens to Fall …

The intended outcome was Trump would have more certified electoral college votes than the election’s actual winner, Joe Biden.

Navarro claimed that then-president Trump was “on board with the strategy”and that up to 100 congressmen were committed to executing the plan. 

Goal Line Play Comes Up Short

However the plan was dependent on Vice President Mike Pence’s participation. It was difficult to pressure Pence, said Navarro, according to Wikipedia: 

Because all communication passed through his chief of staff, Marc Short, who had been president of the Koch Brothers funded Freedom Partners. It was like the Soviet Union taking over Eastern Europe. As an Iron Koch Curtain fell over the vice president, the only way you could speak to VPOTUS was to go through Short.” — Peter Navarro

Pence himself rejected the strategy, but Republican legislators initially followed the plan, with Arizona representative Paul Gosar objecting to his state’s vote counts. 

And, as it turns out things turned darker.

In December after the election, right-wing political activist and organizer Ali Alexander said that he, Gosar, Biggs, and Representative Mo Brooks were “planning something big”: a “mob” to pressure Congress into rejecting the election results. — Wikipedia

In a since-deleted video, Alexander said: “We four schemed up of putting maximum pressure on Congress while they were voting.”

To be fair, Gosar’s office did not respond to media inquiries about this allegation. But News outlets noted that Gosar’s social media accounts had expressed support for Alexander in the past, according to sources cited in Wikipedia.

In the joint session of Congress to formally count the votes of the Electoral College on January 6, 2021, Gosar and Senator Ted Cruz led a challenge to Arizona’s electoral results. — Wikipedia

And, then the Weirdness Descended

Hours after the January 6 storming of the Capitol, during which one police officer and four marchers eventually died, Gosar was the first member of Congress to advance the conspiracy theory that antifa was to blame for the violence, echoed by Brooks and Representative Matt Gaetz.

When Congress reconvened that night, the challenge to the Arizona vote had been rejected 6-93 in the Senate and 121-303 in the House. Gosar, Biggs and Debbie Lesko of Arizona voted to reject Arizona’s vote results, according to Wikipedia cited sources.

As a result of Gosar’s alleged involvement in the storming of the Capitol, three of his siblings called for his expulsion from Congress. 

“When you talk about what happened the other day, you’re talking about treason. You’re talking about overthrowing the government. That’s what this is. If that doesn’t rise to the level of expulsion, what does?” said Tim Gosar. 

Pardon Me, PLEASE

On January 19, the last day of the Trump administration, it was reported that Gosar and Biggs sought pardons from Trump. 

    • No pardons were granted to them or anyone else involved in the storming of the Capitol or the preceding “Save America” rally.
    • In June 2021, Gosar was one of 21 House Republicans to vote against a resolution to give the Congressional Gold Medal to police officers who defended the U.S. Capitol on January 6.
    • After proceedings were interrupted by the January 6 Capitol attack, Pence cited the violence as a rationale for blocking further challenges.

Evidence

“3”  Steve Zahn, 51: “‘Don’t sweat the small stuff,’ they say. ‘The little things add up,’ they say. So which is it? Forget about the scale of things for now and focus on their gravitational pull. If it’s important, you’ll be attracted to it.” Scorpio

I was hoping for more.  This whole Green Bay Sweep stuff and nutty elected officials supporting extremism even his siblings can’t stomach is as confusing as this Holiday Tau.

Random ones that make me want change my sign.

Today’s Holiday Birthday: 

Your talent for listening with your whole being makes wonderful music out of your year. People, nature and ideas intertwine, clash and harmonize to help you move toward an unexpected destiny much to your liking. Your openness engenders practical and magical connections for whatever you and your loved ones need.

“4”  Steve McQueen (1930 – 1980): “You don’t expect people to think and behave like you do. This makes you easy to be around. Others can tell that you’re not imposing rules or judgments on them. People feel accepted for who they are.” Aries

True, even that one crazy uncle every family claims.  Which is why it was so tempting to tell my story about Peter Navarro’s request for which I volunteered just before I left The Paul Merage School of Business for our anniversary vacation to Italy.  Navarro taught classes there and we’d pass in the hallways.  Turned out the resume was for his wife.  She lived and worked as an architect in Laguna Beach.  The last I saw Navarro was on a break during his class when I introduced myself, said I had edited his wife’s resume for which he thanked me.  I just found out today, that they divorced around the same time Emma the Baroness and I took off for Charles de Gulle Airport on British Airways. 

“5”  Steve Aoki, 41; Steven Spielberg, 74: “Why do those who know the least tend to talk the longest? Your observations may be brief by comparison, but they go right to the heart of the matter, so don’t hesitate to lead the way.” Sagittarius

That was always my critique of our former, twice impeached president.  When he got wound up and improvised from the teleprompters he just started stringing together phrases like I used to when I had no idea what the answer to a question was, but I had to answer it in a 5-page essay.  For which I’d receive a D+ or a C-.  I’m not like that.  I facilitate conversations after it gets going and I can find something humorous to say. 

“5”  Steve Jobs, (1955 – 2011): “You’re socially aware and it works to your advantage. Conversational breeziness features fitting topics. You have a terrific sense of who is open to you, when to advance and how best to retreat.” Pisces

Throughout my several careers I found myself working with a wide variety of people from the bottom of society and workplaces up through supervision and management levels to the C-suite.  And, by the nature of introducing change into companies, you had to size people up who had resources and were on the positive side of change and the others that weren’t.  And then you had to address each group differently.

What’s Going On

Literally Bottled and Set Adrift from KnowWhere Atoll

    • @KnowLabs suite of 36 digital magazines, according to my analytics, grew from 12559 this week to 12654 organically grown followers.
    • Orange County Beach Towns 216 viewers stopped by the week before.

Foresight

Quality-of-Life

Long-Form

    • “Here, Right Matters: An American Story” by Alexander Vindman. “We’d long been confused by the president’s policy of accommodation and appeasement of Russia, the United States’ most pressing major adversary. Russia’s president Vladimir Putin invaded Ukraine, seizing the Crimean Peninsula, attacking its industrial heartland, the Donbass, from the capital, Kyiv. By 2019, little had changed, Russian military and security forces and their proxy separatists continued to occupy the Donbass. The biggest change was to Ukraine’s importance as a bulwark against Russian aggression weeks earlier, the White House had abruptly put a hold on nearly four hundred million dollars.” 
    • David Enrich begins his book with a suicide in “Deutsche Bank Dark Towers: Deutsche Bank, Donald Trump, and an Epic Trail of Destruction” and then meticulously details the bank’s Russian money laundering operations. Deutsche’s Russian business surged after revenues had fallen 50% due to the 2008 financial crisis. Putin’s Russia, poured in to Deutsche from deals it did with VTB Bank, linked to the Kremlin’s intelligence apparatus. Deutsche positioned itself as a crucial cog in “The Laundromat” by doing what couldn’t be done — processing cross-border transactions for banks that were too small  and didn’t have offices outside their home countries.
    • “Unthinkable: Trauma, Truth, and the Trials of American Democracy” by Jamie Raskin recalls one tragedy no parent should endure — the suicide of his son — and then a second tragedy at almost the same time — the insurrection on January 6th 2021, that terrified he and his congressional peers who were tasked by the Constitution to routinely oversee the orderly transfer of power from one former president to the duly elected new President. 
    • “A Warning” by Anonymous (Miles Taylor) written prior to the January 6th Insurrection as an insider’s account documenting how frequently the former President’s behavior and rage without any “guard rails” showed just how far he would go to win the next election at any cost while spinning lies and misinformation on top of each other.  
    • “Peril” by Bob Woodward and Robert Costa provides anecdotes, stories and inside reporting documenting the controversial last days of Donald Trump’s presidency, as well as the presidential transition and early presidency of Joe Biden. 
    • “Devil’s Bargain: Steve Bannon, Donald Trump, and the Nationalist Uprising,” by Joshua Green tracks the money behind the scenes leading up to the 2016 presidential election and the growing influence of Steve Bannon’s network of extreme nationalists.

Image Credit: Wikimedia Commons

Inspired by Holiday Mathis – Creators Syndicate

CENTER FOR KNOWLEDGE CREATION AND INNOVATION

The Knowledge Path | Know Laboratories | Knowledge Banking | Knowledge ATMs | Western Skies and Island Currents | Best West Road Trip

S4 E27 — Who Cares If It’s The Right Thing To Do Anymore?

They promoted the Pence Card as a contingency similar to the 1960 presidential election, in which two slates of electors were prepared pending results of a late recount of ballots in Hawaii

“5”  Steve Carell, 57; Steve Martin, 74; Steve Wozniak, 69: “To believe in your ability to sense what the right thing to do is and trust yourself to act accordingly promotes confidence in who you are now. For even more confidence, extend the same courtesy backward to Past You. No regrets.” Leo

Hi and welcome to Saturday’s 27th Episode in Season 4 of  Our Disruptively Resilient Year” on this 16th day of April in the spring of 2022.

We concluded the three-year examination of how bits of wisdom changed — during the “normal” pre-pandemic year compared to the pandemic year, and more recently to the paradoxically normal year. 

“The Tau of Steves: What You Don’t Know Could Fill a Book”

Table of Contents

Season Four continues now within domestic and global chaos.

Previously in Season Four, The Disruptively Resilient Year

S4 E26What Happens If No One Asks a Question?; S4 E25Accountability?S4 E24Another Spooky Role to Play on the Outside

Related from Season Three, the Paradoxically Normal Year

S3 E27What the World Needs Now Before It’s Too Late; S3 E26Following Alice Down the Rabbit Hole; S3 E25 Art Lives Upon Discussion, Upon Experiment, Upon Curiosity …; S3 E24Reunion on the Edge of the Pacific Ocean near Legoland? Hell Yeah! 

Related from Season Two, the Pandemic Year

S2 E27Why I Have to Keep Leo da V on a Leash and So Should You; S2 E26Rethinking the N-Word ; S2 E25Are You an Innie or Outie Thinker?; S2 E24Working Remote from KnowWhere Atoll;

Related from Season One, the Normal Year

S1 E27Day 27 of My 1-Year Experiment; S1 E26Day 26  of My 1-Year Experiment; S1 E25Day 25 of My 1-Year Experiment; S1 E24Day 24 of My 1-Year Experiment

Context

If you haven’t been following along, the previous 6 episodes illustrate political turmoil in this Disruptively Resilient Year which add to our summary in S4 E18. 

Our last episode follows Trump’s announcement for the 2020 nomination after his election denying followers in the 6 battleground states lost when the red wave failed to materialize. Today we pick the continuing story with the “Pence Card”.

What started as the “Pence Card” floated as a legal theory by Ivan Raiklin in a two page proposal, then championed by National Security Adviser Michael Flynn tweeted to the former President.

Raiklin asserted then-Vice President Mike Pence had unilateral authority to reject electoral votes from states deemed to be fraudulent.

So Boris Epshteyn worked with Rudy Giuliani in December 2020 to persuade Republican officials in seven states to prepare certificates of ascertainment for slates of Trump “alternate electors” to be presented to Pence for certification. — Wikipedia

They promoted the Pence Card as a contingency similar to the 1960 presidential election, in which two slates of electors were prepared pending results of a late recount of ballots in Hawaii, according to Wikipedia sources. 

Both parties agreed to that recount, which ultimately resulted in John F. Kennedy winning the state, though the outcome of the election did not hinge on the Hawaii results. By contrast, in the case of the 2020 election, the stated need for slates of alternate electors in multiple states was predicated on persistent false claims of nationwide election fraud.  — Wikipedia

The Epshteyn Show

Epshteyn asserted the slates of alternate electors were not fraudulent and “it is not against the law, it is according to the law.”

In on the ruse, dozens of Republican legislators from Arizona, Georgia, Michigan, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin wrote Pence on January 5. 

All Pence had to do like the loyal former Vice President he had done many times in the past was to delay the January 6 certification for ten days.

When he did, those 5 key states would have time to replace the elector slates. 

Pence did not act on the request and that day also rejected a proposal made by Eastman:

That a vice president could simply choose to reject the electoral college results; a vice president’s role in certifying the results is constitutionally ministerial. — Wikipedia

Command Center

The Washington Post reported on October 23, 2021 that the Willard Hotel, was a “command center” for a White House plot to overturn the results of the 2020 election.

Epshteyn told The Washington Post in October 2021 

That he continued to believe Pence “had the constitutional power to send the issue back to the states for 10 days to investigate the widespread fraud and report back well in advance of Inauguration Day, January 20th.”

Epshteyn was subpoenaed in January 2022 to testify before the House Select Committee on the January 6 Attack, according to Wikipedia

Pence didn’t fall for the “Pence Card”  

But it was in that context, that during the January 5 meeting at the Willard Hotel, Eastmen laid out the details in his January 4 memo describing his theory that Vice President Mike Pence could refuse to certify certain state elector slates the following day, and hand Trump a second term instead.

Actually, there were two memos.  The infamous six-step plan and a second, a more extensive plan, with multiple scenarios for Pence to take to overturn Biden’s election according to Wikipedia:

    • The first memo described the constitutional and statutory process for opening and counting of electoral votes under the 12th Amendment and Electoral Count Act, alleging that the Electoral Count Act was unconstitutional. 
    • The memo further claimed that the Vice President, who also serves as President of the Senate and presides over the joint session of Congress, “does the counting, including the resolution of disputed electoral votes… and all the Members of Congress can do is watch.” 
    • The memo refers to the actions of John Adams and Thomas Jefferson during the presidential elections of 1796 and 1800 as evidence for this claim; some supporters of President Trump, such as Congressman Louie Gohmert, had falsely claimed that Jefferson’s counting of Georgia’s electoral votes in 1800 indicated that the Vice President could unilaterally accept or reject electoral votes.
    • The memo then laid out a six-step plan for Pence to overturn Biden’s election

Behind Memo Number Two

The second memo laid out a more extensive plan with multiple scenarios for Pence to take to overturn Biden’s election: 

    • The first section outlined fictional illegal conduct by election officials in six states (Arizona, Georgia, Michigan, Nevada, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin). 
    • The second section again alleged that the Electoral Count Act was unconstitutional, and that Pence had the power to unilaterally accept or reject electoral votes. 
    • The third section referred to “7 states” and outlined various alternatives for Pence to take to overturn Biden’s election.
    • Slates of electors declaring Trump the winner actually were submitted from the seven states, but the National Archives did not accept the unsanctioned documents and they did not explicitly enter the deliberations.
  • If all went according to Eastman’s plan, Pence would have declared Trump the winner.  He would have won more Electoral College votes after the seven states were thrown out, 232 votes to 222.

Evidence

“3” Steve Zahn, 51: “We want what seems somewhat, but not entirely inaccessible. Complete inaccessibility inspires derision. Desire will be ignited where beauty meets the unfinished or unpolished. Rawness makes a thing accessible.” Scorpio

Can I be honest?  I just don’t know how to interpret this observation.  But, somehow I like it.

Random ones that make me want change my sign.

Today’s Holiday Birthday: 

You’ll experience many environments and get the best of every world. Chaotic challenges shape you; calm, supportive places allow for intensive, focused work. You are brilliant without trying to be or do anything other than what comes naturally. Someone will travel far to see you — the ultimate compliment.

Really?  Can’t wait!

“4”  Steve McQueen (1930 – 1980): “Life is bustling and you’ll do what you can. As for the rest, instead of saying “I don’t have time,” try more empowering language like, “this is not my priority right now” and feel like an absolute boss.”Aries

This is not my priority right now.  

“4”  Steve Howey, 42: “You’ve a talent for understanding just how much you can and should take on. It’s natural to want to distance yourself from a harsh reality or distract yourself from pain.” Cancer

Haha.  A life lesson I learned the hard way.  I never could estimate just how much time it would take to achieve a goal for a client in my consulting practice.  So crafting winning proposals was hardly my strength.  Then, you’re stuck with a contract that pulls more time and energy out of you than is necessary.  

“5”  Steve Carell, 57; Steve Martin, 74; Steve Wozniak, 69: “To believe in your ability to sense what the right thing to do is and trust yourself to act accordingly promotes confidence in who you are now. For even more confidence, extend the same courtesy backward to Past You. No regrets.” Leo

Wow, this like a novel took an unexpected twist at the end.  I felt I’d apply it to how Emma the Baroness and I roll our eyes at what isn’t right, but has been going on for Three Seasons now on the national scene.  But instead it’s a reminder to identify those hard won lessons from the past and not make it so hard on myself.  Here’s to the next manuscript!

“3”  Steve Greene, 34; Steve Guttenberg, 61; Stephen King, 72: “As you make more of a distinction between what you have to do and what you choose to do, you understand that the list of ‘have-to’s’ is actually quite small. You’ll examine your reasons for continuing with certain responsibilities.” Virgo

Somehow I feel cheated.  Here you started out with a great premise, and then it dissipated.  Really?  I hoped for more insight.

“5”  Steve Harvey, 62; Stephan Patis, 53;  Stephen Hawking (1943 – 2018): “Even though a job is nearly complete, the refinements take almost as much time as the job itself did. Tending to details is hard work, but also very worth the effort.” Capricorn

See, this is what I had hoped for on a day like today.

Holiday Theme for The Day: 

Albert Camus said it’s necessary to fall in love, “if only to provide an alibi for all the random despair you are going to feel anyway.” Can you think of times when you felt a certain way first and looked for reasons later? … The opposite directive — claim hope and watch it blossom in your life.

What’s Going On

Literally Bottled and Set Adrift from KnowWhere Atoll

    • @KnowLabs suite of 36 digital magazines, according to my analytics, grew from 12559 this week to 12654 organically grown followers.
    • Orange County Beach Towns 216 viewers stopped by the week before.

Foresight

Quality-of-Life

Long-Form

    • “Here, Right Matters: An American Story” by Alexander Vindman. “We’d long been confused by the president’s policy of accommodation and appeasement of Russia, the United States’ most pressing major adversary. Russia’s president Vladimir Putin invaded Ukraine, seizing the Crimean Peninsula, attacking its industrial heartland, the Donbass, from the capital, Kyiv. By 2019, little had changed, Russian military and security forces and their proxy separatists continued to occupy the Donbass. The biggest change was to Ukraine’s importance as a bulwark against Russian aggression weeks earlier, the White House had abruptly put a hold on nearly four hundred million dollars.” 
    • David Enrich begins his book with a suicide in “Deutsche Bank Dark Towers: Deutsche Bank, Donald Trump, and an Epic Trail of Destruction” and then meticulously details the bank’s Russian money laundering operations. Deutsche’s Russian business surged after revenues had fallen 50% due to the 2008 financial crisis. Putin’s Russia, poured in to Deutsche from deals it did with VTB Bank, linked to the Kremlin’s intelligence apparatus. Deutsche positioned itself as a crucial cog in “The Laundromat” by doing what couldn’t be done — processing cross-border transactions for banks that were too small  and didn’t have offices outside their home countries.
    • “Unthinkable: Trauma, Truth, and the Trials of American Democracy” by Jamie Raskin recalls one tragedy no parent should endure — the suicide of his son — and then a second tragedy at almost the same time — the insurrection on January 6th 2021, that terrified he and his congressional peers who were tasked by the Constitution to routinely oversee the orderly transfer of power from one former president to the duly elected new President. 
    • “A Warning” by Anonymous (Miles Taylor) written prior to the January 6th Insurrection as an insider’s account documenting how frequently the former President’s behavior and rage without any “guard rails” showed just how far he would go to win the next election at any cost while spinning lies and misinformation on top of each other.  
    • “Peril” by Bob Woodward and Robert Costa provides anecdotes, stories and inside reporting documenting the controversial last days of Donald Trump’s presidency, as well as the presidential transition and early presidency of Joe Biden. 
    • “Devil’s Bargain: Steve Bannon, Donald Trump, and the Nationalist Uprising,” by Joshua Green tracks the money behind the scenes leading up to the 2016 presidential election and the growing influence of Steve Bannon’s network of extreme nationalists.

Image Credit: Wikimedia Commons

Inspired by Holiday Mathis – Creators Syndicate

CENTER FOR KNOWLEDGE CREATION AND INNOVATION

The Knowledge Path | Know Laboratories | Knowledge Banking | Knowledge ATMs | Western Skies and Island Currents | Best West Road Trip

S3 E35 — This Ain’t No Zemblanity

What about luck? An “architecture of serendipity” provides exposure to new ideas, people, and ways of life so crucial to you, because it expands your horizons.  And, when you boiled away all the jargon, this was at the heart of my new knowledge creation and innovation services.

“5”  Steve McQueen (1930 – 1980): The first idea that comes to you may indeed be the best one, but come up with more anyway, if only for the accompanying thrill of heading into unexplored directions.” Aries

Hi and welcome to Sunday’s Episode 35 in Season 3 of  My Paradoxically Normal Year” on this 25th day of April in the spring of 2021 — which is a three-year examination of how bits of wisdom changed during the “normal” pre-pandemic year and then in the pandemic year, and now months after.

The Tau of Steves: What You Don’t Know Could Fill a Book

Table of Contents

Previously from Season Three, the Paradoxically Normal Year

S3 E34Why You’re Susceptible to Subliminal Suggestions Like …; S3 E33Do Meaningful Coincidences Really Exist?; S3 E32But, Why Should You Care?

Related from Season Two, The Pandemic Year

S2 E35Was this Pandemic Year a 1-Off or New Way of Life?; S2 E34Why Is This Kicking Off the 4th Industrial Revolution?; S2 E33What Happens When Your Business Collapses?; S2 E32Trapped and Bored? Or Unleashing a Reinvention Wave?

Related from Season One, The Normal Year

S1 E35Day 35 of My 1-Year Experiment ; S1 E34Day 34 of My 1-Year Experiment; S1 E33Day 33 of My 1-Year Experiment; S1 E32Day 32 of My 1-Year Experiment

Context

In the Report’s Conclusion Section of The One-Year Natural Experiment we’ve covered meaningful coincidences and synchronicity, now it’s about their second cousin,  serendipity or happy accidents as in unplanned, but fortunate discoveries.

What about luck? Let’s skip “zemblanity” coined by William Boyd — you know, “If it weren’t for bad luck I’d have no luck at all.”

In my career workshops I emphasized the path to higher paying and more enjoyable positions was paved with preparation — identifying what you did well, was valued by decision-makers facing challenges you could capitalize,  who commanded the budget needed to engage your services and in which types of or phase of growth would value your skills and abilities the most.  

That’s the preparation part of organizing you luck.  

Over the years I was able to predict with almost with 90% accuracy when a person would luck into the job of their dreams if they interviewed almost anyone informally, described which challenges a client or employer faced (that you met before), asked for three referrals to other people and broadcast to your audience in a similar matter. 

And, then out of the blue one of your connections hosts you and your future client or boss at a lunch, you loosely propose what you do and one thing leads to another and boom you’ve been hired.

In my other career, advising innovation teams and product development teams I introduced a variety of tools to increase serendipity into decision making, problem solving and creative endeavors.

Innovations made by chance have gained purchase throughout the history of product invention and scientific discovery. 

Most everyday products had serendipitous roots (Post-Its, Silly Putty, microwave, velcro, popsicle and even penicillin) with many early ones related to animals or imitations of nature.

Serendipity has potential application in the design of social media, information searches, and web browsing.

In some Paradoxy-Moron organizations serendipity factors into potential design principles for online activities capturing a wide array of information and viewpoints, rather than just re-enforcing a researcher’s opinion.

 An “architecture of serendipity” provides exposure to new ideas, people, and ways of life so crucial to you, because it expands your horizons.  And, when you boiled away all the jargon, this was at the heart of my new knowledge creation and innovation services.

Now in this passion project of living life like an art form in a natural experiment, each day’s Holiday Tau triggered lucky new insights and fresher perspectives.

Evidence

While Zahnny, the Fonz, Emma the Baroness and I inherited a sucky Holiday Tau today, the outlook for next week had our names all over it.

Random ones that make me want change my sign.

Wait, what a coincidence, throw in a smidge of serendipity and we’ll be on to something, Steve

“5”  Steve McQueen (1930 – 1980): The first idea that comes to you may indeed be the best one, but come up with more anyway, if only for the accompanying thrill of heading into unexplored directions.” Aries 

Hi Howey, I’m already a believer in your Holiday Tau.  It’s already 2:46 p.m. and I’m still banging away on this document.  Did somebody say squirrel?  Time break this composition off and step outside!

“4”  Steve Howey, 42:The most productive day involves stints of concentrated effort followed by breaks in the fresh air. To skip the breaks makes the journey much less enjoyable, and longer, too.” Cancer

As an introvert, I’m already tuned into my supply of emotional energy almost like a battery knowing when I need some time to myself to plug back in to the source.

“5”  Steve Carell, 57; Steve Martin, 74; Steve Wozniak, 69: “While emotional energy, like love, may be invisible, to your eye, it animates the physical world quite obviously. You will easily tell how people are feeling, especially when they are trying to hide those feelings.” Leo

So, let’s piggy-back on the Holiday Tau of the inventor and his two comedian partners in Tau.

“5”  Steve Greene, 34; Steve Guttenberg, 61:Daydreaming is anything but a waste of time, though don’t expect concrete ideas to come from it now. Today’s flights of fancy open up the borders for later breakthroughs.” Virgo

Will somebody throw a little serendipity my way?  I’m well overdue.

“4”  Steve Nash, 45:You’ve a quirky style and a worldview that could be described as ‘singular.’ You’re unintentionally entertaining, and this works in your favor. Once disarmed, people are so amenable to your suggestions!”Aquarius

Normally, Steve I love your TauBits of Wisdom, but not so much today.

“3”  Steve Jobs, (1955 – 2011): “You don’t fear the influence of others. You know who you are. It is because your rules for yourself are so firm that you can afford to have an open mind.” Pisces

Holiday Forecast for the Week Ahead: 

“This…will not disappoint by ramping up the tension. Besides the domain of life, death and transformation, seduction, with a penchant for using shadows and fog to enhance the allure of our fascinations. Some will be drawn to build temptations, and others will be called to fall prey to them. An early theme of this transit is: what a little power can do. It changes people. Some would say it corrupts them. … will recall to us the times we’ve used and abused power, and the times we were victimized by forces more powerful than us. The lessons of these happenings aren’t learned all at once. They soak in over time. Just when we think we’ve gotten all we can from a past lesson, … will show us a new level of meaning we hadn’t been aware of before.”

What’s Going On

Literally Bottled and Set Adrift from KnowWhere Atoll 

    • @KnowLabs suite of digital magazines jumps from 8003 to 8068 organically grown followers

Foresight

Quality-of-Life 

Long-Form

    • “Consilience: The Unity of Knowledge” by E.O. Wilson, an entomologist who studied colonies of ants for their insights.  But didn’t stop there, according to The Wall Street Journal, “A dazzling journey across the sciences and humanities in search of deep laws to unite them.”
    • “True Believers,” the novel by Kurt Andersen (which seems to precede Fantasyland)? I like how he goes back and forth from now to the ‘60s in which the main character is writing a memoir, but needs “Okays” from her friends who had been hiding a secret for 40+ years that could ruin their careers?  Like, what’s my equivalent
    • “Disappearing Through the Skylight” by O.B. Hardison, Jr. which proceeded “Consilience” by a decade.  Hardison’s been described as a polymathic renaissance man who wrote, “… Nature has slipped, perhaps finally beyond our field of vision.”  What does it mean for “… science, history, art and architecture, music, language, ultimately, for humanity”? This one provides missing chunks of understanding where we came from and where we’re going.
    • I enjoy any of the Harry Bosch detective books in the series authored by Michael Connelly.  “A Darkness More Than Night,” described “A strange constricting feeling filled his gut. He didn’t believe in coincidences… (It) was a coincidence that even a believer in coincidence would have a difficult time accepting.”So much for detectives, tying up loose ends, relying on their hunches and reordering data, information and witness first hand accounts.

Image Credit: Wikimedia Commons

Inspired by: Holiday Mathis – Creators Syndicate

CENTER FOR KNOWLEDGE CREATION AND INNOVATION

The Knowledge Path | Know Laboratories | Knowledge Banking | Knowledge ATMs | Western Skies and Island Currents | Best West Road Trips

S2 E69 — How Can You Tell Who’s an Engineer at a Party?

A few years earlier they had won Company of the Year honors like my team did in my “It’s better to ask for forgiveness than to beg for permission” company.

“5”  Steve Carrell, 57; Steve Martin, 74; Steve Wozniak, 69: You’ve known both introversion and extroversion and are currently an ‘ambivert,’ as some situations make you feel outgoing and others make you feel closed up.” Leo

Hi and welcome to Thursday’s Episode 69 in Season 2 of  “My Pandemic Year Natural Experiment” on this 25th day of June in the summer of 2020.  

“The Tau of Steves: What You Don’t Know Could Fill a Book”

Table of Contents

Season One and Two are a two-year examination of how bits of wisdom changed during the “normal” pre-pandemic and then in this unfolding pandemic year.

Previously in Season Two, the Pandemic Year

S2 E68Take More Breakthrough Showers;  S2 E67Here’s What I Didn’t Know That Will Help You; S2 E66The Romance of a Good Humor Man in Detroit

Related from Season One, the Normal Year

S1 E69Anniversary Trip of a Lifetime Deep in the Heart of Tuscany; S1 E68Overcompensating for Disappointing Results?; S1 E67Don’t Misunderstand Me; S1 E66Do Your Proposals Lead to Contracts?

Context

This is the continuing story of how I learned important lessons from the school of hard knocks and an introduction for the second volume of books I described in the previous episode.

I had already changed careers and switched industries following the future brought to us by technology companies.

Founder’s Curse

I think it’s called the founder’s curse.  You hit a milestone — mature growth phase — and you build a headquarters to house your sprawling groups of employees dispersed and distributed in the local commercial offices.  And, almost a year to the day from when you celebrate with the ribbon cutting dignitaries your market shifts away from you and you free fall into a decline. 

During which they either sell or lease their building to other companies on the rise and distribute their workforce to smaller footprint buildings.

They fell into a decline.  I fell into unemployment. But I activated “Plan B” — becoming a consumer of outplacement at the firm that fired its founder a year or two earlier who, by the way,  received heart stents to keep him going. 

Small world.

Long-Term Retainer

Knowing how to go about finding work, an employer or as a client, within weeks I scored a long-term retainer with a life insurance and mutual fund firm.  It was the kind of mature organization that employed maintenance workers just to polish its each brick in its elaborate entry way.  

A few years earlier they had won Company of the Year honors like my team did in my “It’s better to ask for forgiveness than to beg for permission” company.  

Their challenge was asking if you can interject innovation into a century’s old mature company?  

I figured, why not try. 

It was a complex, complicated maneuver requiring tons of new knowledge and new ideas packaged in a way they could swallow without triggering an immune system response.  

I was free to add more clients, so I did — teaching reengineering and continuous improvement through the local university and collaborating with the Vice President of Human Resources at a headquarters of a medical laboratory to build out a Leadership Academy.  

But, to be honest I yearned to return to a more Paradoxy-Moron organization, the kind that thrives on high degrees of disruptive innovation, independence and speed. 

So much so, that I probably viewed the next opportunity through rose colored glasses.

Pursuit of a Paradoxy-Moron Organization

I didn’t mind the commute along the InFox coastline, which had grown in congestion but for a shorter distance to Sorrento Valley in San Diego.  

A smaller more manageable sized company of 200 employees generating revenues of roughly 200 million dollars required a full-time director of organizational development and training. Hot damn, that’s me.

It competed in the emerging multi-media projector business.  

A new CEO replaced the one who took over from the much beloved founder.  Most of the employees from day one believed they would always be in line for promotions. They wore so many hats in the beginning, surely they figured, when they hung up most of those caps in the closet they’d be entitled to freely move up the organizational chart and place their remaining hat on their office’s rack while claiming a position yet to be formulated.  

Instead, those positions at the top level went to people like me who had larger company experience, than they did. Nothing wrong with them,  but they had yet to experience by trial and error what would be required when the pace accelerated and risks grew exponentially.  We on the other hand could “parachute in” take a look around, size up the situation and move forward very quickly.

Still by Thursday evenings, the 1 hour and 15 minute commute wore on me and I didn’t look forward to the early Friday afternoon navigating the bumper to bumper traffic clogging the 5 freeway traveling north out of the city.  

De j’ vu, right?

Technology Distribution Company

Luckily one of the HR VPs who had received outplacement with me accepted a similar role at an Orange County technology distribution business, interviewed me and offered me a similar job but much closer to home.

Wow, it was great!  Except I failed to take off my rose colored glasses. Strike one.

And, strike two, I wished I hadn’t erased the voice mail message sent to all employees announcing the acquisition of our company while simultaneously assuring everyone that no-one would be laid off.  

Oh, and strike three, I wished I had asked just one more question in my initial interview with my VP buddy, instead of during subsequent working sessions with him as my boss.  

When it was too late during my orientation, I asked, “So what is the strategy to which I should tie my activities?” To which he responded, “I don’t know.”  The CEO kept those cards close to his vest.  

I did know the regional distribution company tried to first grow nationally and then internationally.  But, later they ran into complications with the technology required to translate currencies for product ordering.  Instead the acquirer from Europe already had systems in place which accommodated both different languages and currency types seamlessly.

Oops.

Strategy, Talent Branding, Knowledge Creation and Innovation

I left to join colleagues which I had hired to sync up the distributor’s “internal brand” with their” external brand” to attract more sales engineers.  The engineers they sought weren’t the “straight A” top-of -the-class candidates, which I learned never had considered a technology distribution company in their top 5 to pursue.  

If we were honest, those sought after engineers had no clue about our company, or if they heard of us, we never cracked their top 25 list.  

But, that’s OK.  My eventual colleagues discovered we shouldn’t be pursuing them either. Our targets were the fraternity rush chairmen who happened to take engineering and technology classes, but actually had a social personality.  

The joke told internally was, “How do you tell who’s an engineer at a party?  They’re the ones looking at their shoes.  How do you tell who’s the sales engineer? They’re looking at your shoes.”

Once my time at the plate with the technology distribution company ended with a called third strike, I hooked up with the team I had hired.  We crashed our models together — learning and development, knowledge creation, media production, internet communities, advertising and marketing. 

From our studio in the corner of Laguna Canyon Road we continued internal and external branding with clients ranging from startups to the Fortune 100.  

I learned companies paid much more for branding campaigns than I was ever able to charge in the HR world.  

We pioneered a way of capturing the essence of a brand from interviews using digital video, searched through audio tracks for the touch points and reused portions of the interviews for orienting new coders hired at accelerated rates.  

Unfortunately we expanded too quickly like many mom-and-pop restaurants do by anticipating an exploding  market that never grew and eventually dried up forcing the two founding partners to declare bankruptcy.

Dot Com Bankruptcy

Three of us continued on our own and tried to make a go of our pioneering efforts to capture the new knowledge being spun off so it wouldn’t fall through the cracks for Paradoxy-Moron organizations.  But the market didn’t support it and we had to go our separate ways.

One of my colleagues from the training and development association and the Orange County Development Round Table that grew out of it, needed to conduct survey work.  I had just been introduced to a software startup that seemed to be the “Swiss Army Knife of Surveys” with additional functions and features that could fit almost any requirement. 

Best of all it could generate findings almost immediately instead of weeks which increased the probability that leadership development could be initiated right away. 

Swiss Army Knife Software in Search of a Problem

I joined forces as the “translator” to human resource executives  and provided professional services consulting to define the scope of implementation projects.

The guy in charge of their sales and I hatched a marketing scheme to use their software as a pre-Glassdoor application. We approached companies for permission to survey their employees and from that produce a ranking of the best places to work, first in Orange County, and then branching out geographical region by region. 

We needed sponsors. I met the marketing person for a consulting firm offering organizational consulting and outplacement at a breakfast networking meeting.  

She wanted me to pitch the idea to the guy heading up their organizational consulting.  I could tell he wasn’t buying the value proposition.  He said they had their own propriety software and besides he didn’t have the budget authority anyway.  

Dejected and walking on my way out near the reception area I bumped into an old friend  almost literally as he exited his well appointed office and who happened to be the general manager. He asked me if I’d be interested in becoming their Key Executive Advisor.  I learned I’d be heading up the region’s outplacement services for C-suite executives paid for by their former companies.

Clearly this was a major stretch for me.  Fake it until you make it, right?

Rose colored glasses again?  You bet.  I immediately envisioned a 360 degree opportunity.  

Evidence

“4”  Steve Zahn, 51: “In uncertain circumstances, it is only human to rely on assumptions. Be superhuman instead. Let go of what you know and reserve judgment as you try to absorb the truth in front of you.” Scorpio

Isn’t this the lesson I keep missing?  The trouble of seeing the patterns emerging just around the corner and then pursuing opportunities in line with those possibilities is the blinders I wear relying upon those assumptions.

Random ones that make me want change my sign.

“5”  Steve Carrell, 57; Steve Martin, 74; Steve Wozniak, 69: You’ve known both introversion and extroversion and are currently an ‘ambivert,’ as some situations make you feel outgoing and others make you feel closed up.” Leo

So that’s fluid enough to satisfy the introvert in me, who chose public speaking in the form of facilitation, training and addressing membership audiences, as a path to my development.  

“5”  Steve Kerr, 54:There is little in life more valuable than the unconditional support of a true friend. You’ll experience the pure love of an exchange that is without motive or expectation of reciprocity.” Libra

Wow, I’ll say.  Dr. J brings a smile to my child in me as we remember ancient conspiracies we hatched.

“5”  Steve Aoki, 41: For most people, if they know how to start, then they’ll dive right in. Not knowing where to start leads to procrastination. You’ll have the opportunity and privilege of leading the way.” Sagittarius

Are you saying that the one thing I share with Leo da V is not knowing where to start which leads to procrastination?  If not, I will and it’s not my genius move.  

“4”  Steve Harvey, 62:Too many choices can be overwhelming, not enough is boring. You’ll find your own sweet spot of options, but don’t assume it’s the same for all. Some people can handle three, others 23.”  Capricorn

Boy you got that right.  I figure I have enough time to learn as much as I can for handling 23 options.  When you master the first twenty the remaining three leave me feeling bored.  

“5”  Steve Nash, 45:Some thought patterns are like riptides. It’s easy to get carried away and fighting them head-on can be futile. Relax and be carried. Wait for the break — it’s coming — and then you can swim to the shore.” Aquarius 

So, this has been a mantra of mine.  If you’ve ever been body surfing in Newport Beach, California and one of those big waves bears down on you, you have no choice but to dive deeper under it, wait until it spins you like a washing machine until it passes and then you pop up, quickly scan for another.  If there isn’t another you can relax and float awhile until you find one that will propel you back to shore.  That’s what disruptive change feels like if you don’t anticipate it.

What’s Going On

Literally Bottled and Set Adrift from KnowWhere Atoll 

    • @knowlabs followers of one or more of my 35 digital magazines organically grew from 3911 to 4073.

Foresight

Quality-of-Life

Long-Form

    • Saw the movie, didn’t realize that one of my favorite authors, Michael Connelly — his detective Hieronymus (Harry) Bosch book series and Amazon Prime series — also wrote, “The Lincoln Lawyer” which I just finished. Gotta tell you I can’t not see his lead character (Mickey Haller, Bosch’s half brother) as anyone else but Matthew McConaughey. 

Image Credit: Wikimedia Commons

Inspired by: Holiday Mathis – Creators Syndicate

CENTER FOR KNOWLEDGE CREATION AND INNOVATION

The Knowledge Path | Know Laboratories | Knowledge Banking | Knowledge ATMs | Western Skies and Island Currents | Best West Road Trip

S4 E26 — What Happens If No One Asks a Question?

In Peril, Woodward and Costa identify Boris Epshteyn as an associate of Rudy Giuliani who joins Rudy and Steve Bannon in the “War Room” at the Willard — owned jointly by Carr Companies and InterContinental Hotels & Resorts, the Willard InterContinental Washington.

“5”  Steve Harvey, 62; Stephan Patis, 53;  Stephen Hawking (1943 – 2018): “If no one asks a question, nothing gets done. And if people keep asking questions, nothing gets done. Progress is asking the right question at the right time and getting answers before you move on to the next question.” Capricorn

Hi and welcome to Friday’s 26th Episode in Season 4 of  Our Disruptively Resilient Year” on this 15th day of April in the spring of 2022.

We concluded the three-year examination of how bits of wisdom changed — during the “normal” pre-pandemic year compared to the pandemic year, and more recently to the paradoxically normal year. 

“The Tau of Steves: What You Don’t Know Could Fill a Book”

Table of Contents

Season Four continues now within domestic and global chaos.

Previously in Season Four, The Disruptively Resilient Year

S4 E25Accountability?; S4 E24Another Spooky Role to Play on the Outside; S4 E23When In Doubt, Follow the Money

Related from Season Three, the Paradoxically Normal Year

S3 E26Following Alice Down the Rabbit Hole; S3 E25 Art Lives Upon Discussion, Upon Experiment, Upon Curiosity …; S3 E24Reunion on the Edge of the Pacific Ocean near Legoland? Hell Yeah!; S3 E23Free from the Pile of Rubble in Your Brain

Related from Season Two, the Pandemic Year

S2 E26Rethinking the N-Word ; S2 E25Are You an Innie or Outie Thinker?; S2 E24Working Remote from KnowWhere Atoll S2 E23Gaping Loss No Amount of Mourning Will Heal 

Related from Season One, the Normal Year

S1 E26Day 26  of My 1-Year Experiment; S1 E25Day 25 of My 1-Year Experiment; S1 E24Day 24 of My 1-Year Experiment; S1 E23Day 23 of My 1-Year Experiment

Context

In Peril, Woodward and Costa identify Boris Epshteyn as an associate of Rudy Giuliani who joins Rudy and Steve Bannon in the “War Room” at the Willard — Owned jointly by Carr Companies and InterContinental Hotels & Resorts, the Willard InterContinental Washington. 

It’s conveniently situated two blocks east of the White House  and two blocks west of the Metro Center station of the Washington Metro.

And did I fail to mention it sat next to Freedom Plaza, where the rally would be held as Boris Epshteyn, a friend of Eric Trump, Rudy Giuliani and Steve Bannon plotted next steps?

So, just who is Epshteyn?  Jamie Raskin didn’t mention him in my notes, nor did Joshua Green or “Anonymous” so I had to sleuth a little bit and here’s what I found.

Magnet for Shady Characters

Is it just me or does Trump attract shady characters like metal to a magnet? 

Boris joined Trump’s 2016 election campaign after a firm, he was the managing director of business and legal affairs at the boutique investment bank — West America Securities Corporation — was expelled from Financial Industry Regulatory Agency in 2013.

In October 2013, Epshteyn moderated a panel at the investment conference “Invest in Moscow!” The panel was composed mainly of Moscow city government officials, including Sergey Cheremin, a city minister who heads Moscow’s foreign economic and international relations department. — Wikipedia

Remember how Russian oligarchs managed to hide assets converted from rubles into valuable art?  As told in the book by Ben Lewis, and again in a documentary about the Leonardo da Vinci painting being sold by one such oligarch and stored in the booming freeport business?  

A Painting but not s Valuable as a Leonardo

Well, in September 2016, according to Wikipedia,  Epshteyn responded to a question from MSNBC’s Hallie Jackson by offering a new explanation for why a portrait of Trump – paid for by the Donald J. Trump Foundation – wound up on display at Trump National Doral Miami, a Trump-owned for-profit golf resort in Florida. Epshteyn said: 

“There are IRS rules which specifically state that when a foundation has an item, an individual can store those items – on behalf of the foundation – in order to help it with storage costs… And that’s absolutely proper.” 

Misuse of Funds while Self-Dealing

What was at stake was self-dealing. And misuse of a foundation. And the following facts didn’t support his explanation, according to Wikipedia sources:

  • Instead, Trump’s resort was helping the foundation – which has no employees or office space of its own – to store one of its possessions.
  • Epshteyn‘s explanation failed to account for why the storage services required that portrait be displayed in public, as opposed to being maintained in a storage space. 
  • Similarly, Epshteyn failed to explain why the Trump National Doral Miami provided such storage services only for the Trump Foundation and only for a portrait of Trump.

Scripted 2020 Election Conspiracy

Now fast forward to Trump’s next election campaign.

After Trump lost the 2020 election, Epshteyn was a member of a team that gathered at a “command center” in the Willard Hotel one block from the White House days before Biden’s victory was to be certified by vice president Mike Pence in the Senate chamber on January 6. 

The team’s objective was to prevent Biden’s victory from being certified.  — Wikipedia

Desperation had set in among Trump’s inner circle.  John Eastman participated in the attempts to overturn the 2020 United States presidential election.

They were following a script hatched by Orange County’s finest “legal scholar” once serving on the Chapman University faculty and former law clerk to Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas.

During President Donald Trump’s last efforts before the certification of Joe Biden‘s Electoral College victory, Eastman incorrectly told Vice President Mike Pence in an Oval Office meeting on January 5, 2021, that Pence had the constitutional authority to block the certification. — Wikipedia

Constitution’s 12th Amendment

Woodward and Costa explained that while the Democrats held the current House majority, the 12th Amendment of the Constitution stated the voting on a contested election would not be done by a simple majority vote.

Instead, the amendment states that the election vote would be counted in blocs of state delegations, with one vote per state: Republicans now controlled more delegations in the House of Representatives, meaning Trump would likely win if the chamber ended up deciding the victor.

Vice President Pence and former Vice President Dan Quale both hailed from Indiana. So, it was natural that Pence picked up the phone and sought his advice.

“Mike, I live in Arizona,” Quayle said. “There’s nothing out here.

Preposterous and Dangerous

Woodward and Costa described how Quayle thought Trump’s suggestion was preposterous and dangerous.

All he had to do was count the votes. The President of the Senate shall, in the presence of the Senate and House of Representatives, open all the certificates and the votes shall

Trump’s effort to cajole Pence was a dark, Rube Goldberg–like fantasy,

“I do know the position you’re in,” Quayle said. “I also know what the law is. You listen to the parliamentarian. That’s all you do. You have no power. So just forget it.”

Quayle assured Pence that things would be fine. They were conservatives. Just follow the Constitution.

During that same period in December, Senator Mike Lee of Utah spoke with Leader McConnell telling his colleagues for weeks about attempts to not certify the election results: “We have no more authority than the Queen of England. None.” 

6-Point Action Plan

Lee and Lindsay Graham saw the writing on the wall — it was over.  But Lee was directed to John Eastman, another Trump lawyer. 

The two spoke with each other. “There’s a memo about to be developed,” Eastman said. “I’ll get it to you as soon as I can.” Graham’s strategy was now not to try to convince Trump he lost—he had lost that battle—but to convince him he could not change the outcome.

Eastman did send to Mike Lee the six-point plan of action for Pence to throw out the electors from seven states to keep Trump in power, which Lee rejected.

And, Pence did not accept Eastman’s argument either. 

On January 2, Trump, Rudy Giuliani and John Eastman held a conference call with some 300 Republican state legislators in battleground states Biden won to provide them with false allegations of widespread voting fraud they might use to convene special sessions of their legislatures to rescind Biden’s winning slates of electors and replace them with slates of Trump electors for Pence to certify. — Wikipedia

But like Trump, Eastman wasn’t deterred either.

On January 6, 2021, Eastman presented a speech at the White House Trump rally that preceded the 2021 United States Capitol attack and subsequently implored Vice President Pence, via his legal counsel, to violate the Electoral Count Act to delay certification of the election. — Wikipedia

Retired, but not Forgotten

On January 13, 2021, Eastman retired from the Chapman University faculty after the controversy created by his speech at the Trump rally.

More than a year later, on March 28, 2022, federal judge David Carter ruled Eastman, along with Trump, was likely to have conspired to block the January 6, 2021 vote count, according to Wikipedia’s sources.

Evidence

Holiday Theme for The Day: 

warns us of the ego’s tendency to keep us working for its vision. As soon as it gets what it wants, it comes up with a new list of demands. Happiness and freedom depend on restricting the ego’s power with modesty and service. Give the ego just enough to exist, but not enough to take over and run the show.

“4”  Steve Zahn, 51: “Shared creativity is a bond. Writing can unite people. Art can flirt with your eyeballs. A song can pierce you straight through and connect you with invisible thread to the others who hear and love it.” Scorpio

Who wouldn’t appreciate a sentence about art flirting with your eyeballs? But, I really love the invisible thread a song plucks on a thread in the “hear (here) and now.

Random ones that make me want change my sign.

“3”  Steve Winwood, 71; Stevie Wonder, 69; Stephen Colbert, 56: “Your fantasy life is going strong. As for these castles in the air — maybe you can’t live in them, but some of the ideas are practical enough to apply once you touch back down to earth.” Taurus 

Not so much.  I’m no rocket man today, but I do love me some associative thinking.  We’ll have to wait until later for any practical evidence.

“3”  Steve Smith, 30, Stevie Nicks, 72: “Your mood: ambitious. You’ll push yourself. Because going after the larger experiences of life takes a great deal of focus and energy, it will require you to cut out distractions and bring your lower appetites into control.” Gemini

Maybe you can appreciate the premise, it just doesn’t fit for me today —except for the need to cut out distractions.

“4”  Steve Greene, 34; Steve Guttenberg, 61; Stephen King, 72: “New projects gather steam. The work is really just beginning, but encouraging early results are a glimpse of what you’ll get if you keep this up for the long haul.” Virgo

So, this series of episodes I feel compelled to unpack.  Which in turn take the steam out of anything gathering just yet.  Maybe a glimpse here and there shines a little sparkle, but I’m about a week away from turning up the heat on my newer projects identified.  

“5”  Steve Harvey, 62; Stephan Patis, 53;  Stephen Hawking (1943 – 2018): “If no one asks a question, nothing gets done. And if people keep asking questions, nothing gets done. Progress is asking the right question at the right time and getting answers before you move on to the next question.” Capricorn

And, this observation is really what’s driving me so far in this fourth season in the midst of chaos.

What’s Going On

Literally Bottled and Set Adrift from KnowWhere Atoll

    • @KnowLabs suite of 36 digital magazines, according to my analytics, grew from 12559 this week to 12654 organically grown followers.
    • Orange County Beach Towns 216 viewers stopped by the week before.

Foresight

Quality-of-Life

Long-Form

    • “Here, Right Matters: An American Story” by Alexander Vindman. “We’d long been confused by the president’s policy of accommodation and appeasement of Russia, the United States’ most pressing major adversary. Russia’s president Vladimir Putin invaded Ukraine, seizing the Crimean Peninsula, attacking its industrial heartland, the Donbass, from the capital, Kyiv. By 2019, little had changed, Russian military and security forces and their proxy separatists continued to occupy the Donbass. The biggest change was to Ukraine’s importance as a bulwark against Russian aggression weeks earlier, the White House had abruptly put a hold on nearly four hundred million dollars.” 
    • David Enrich begins his book with a suicide in “Deutsche Bank Dark Towers: Deutsche Bank, Donald Trump, and an Epic Trail of Destruction” and then meticulously details the bank’s Russian money laundering operations. Deutsche’s Russian business surged after revenues had fallen 50% due to the 2008 financial crisis. Putin’s Russia, poured in to Deutsche from deals it did with VTB Bank, linked to the Kremlin’s intelligence apparatus. Deutsche positioned itself as a crucial cog in “The Laundromat” by doing what couldn’t be done — processing cross-border transactions for banks that were too small  and didn’t have offices outside their home countries.
    • “Unthinkable: Trauma, Truth, and the Trials of American Democracy” by Jamie Raskin recalls one tragedy no parent should endure — the suicide of his son — and then a second tragedy at almost the same time — the insurrection on January 6th 2021, that terrified he and his congressional peers who were tasked by the Constitution to routinely oversee the orderly transfer of power from one former president to the duly elected new President. 
    • “A Warning” by Anonymous (Miles Taylor) written prior to the January 6th Insurrection as an insider’s account documenting how frequently the former President’s behavior and rage without any “guard rails” showed just how far he would go to win the next election at any cost while spinning lies and misinformation on top of each other.  
    • “Peril” by Bob Woodward and Robert Costa provides anecdotes, stories and inside reporting documenting the controversial last days of Donald Trump’s presidency, as well as the presidential transition and early presidency of Joe Biden. 
    • “Devil’s Bargain: Steve Bannon, Donald Trump, and the Nationalist Uprising,” by Joshua Green tracks the money behind the scenes leading up to the 2016 presidential election and the growing influence of Steve Bannon’s network of extreme nationalists.

Image Credit: Wikimedia Commons

Inspired by Holiday Mathis – Creators Syndicate

CENTER FOR KNOWLEDGE CREATION AND INNOVATION

The Knowledge Path | Know Laboratories | Knowledge Banking | Knowledge ATMs | Western Skies and Island Currents | Best West Road Trip

S3 E34 — Why You’re Susceptible to Subliminal Suggestions Like …

What about synchronicity and meaningful coincidences? Haha.  That was a test.  We covered it on Friday as a discussion section of Conclusions in The One-Year Natural Experiment Report.

“5”  Steve Howey, 42:Try not to get hung up on having a final, polished result because your time is better spent solving a number of problems, which you’ll never get to if you try to make any of them perfect.” Cancer

Hi and welcome to Saturday’s Episode 34 in Season 3 of  My Paradoxically Normal Year” on this 24th day of April in the spring of 2021 — which is a three-year examination of how bits of wisdom changed during the “normal” pre-pandemic year and then in the pandemic year, and now months after.

The Tau of Steves: What You Don’t Know Could Fill a Book

Table of Contents

Previously from Season Three, the Paradoxically Normal Year

S3 E33Do Meaningful Coincidences Really Exist?; S3 E32But, Why Should You Care?; S3 E31Treat It Like a Pawn Ticket to Sketchier Things

Related from Season Two, The Pandemic Year

S2 E34Why Is This Kicking Off the 4th Industrial Revolution?; S2 E33What Happens When Your Business Collapses?; S2 E32Trapped and Bored? Or Unleashing a Reinvention Wave?; S2 E31Getting Charged from Box Automattic-aly

Related from Season One, The Normal Year

S1 E34Day 34 of My 1-Year Experiment; S1 E33Day 33 of My 1-Year Experiment; S1 E32Day 32 of My 1-Year Experiment; S1 E31Day 31 of My 1-Year Experiment

Context

Oh, except this passage about coincidences from President Obama’s recent memoir, “A Promised Land” when he recounts his nomination at the party’s convention: 

“ … formally making the motion to vote me in as the Democratic nominee, the full meaning of my nomination hit me. By coincidence, it was the forty-fifth anniversary of the March on Washington and Dr. King’s historic ‘I Have a Dream’ at National Mall on that day in 1963: ‘We cannot walk alone. And as we walk, we must make the pledge that we shall always march ahead. We cannot turn back.’”

What’s the purpose of the report you ask?  

To explain the gap between the subliminal seduction of horoscopes across the chasm to the “land of people with hardened filters” so entrenched they only see what they believe and consciously or unconsciously disregard the rest.   

Is there any hope for a path to bridge two polarized political extremes as Americans? Which sets up a deeper dive into the “Magical Thinking Tour” to unfold later.

Each morning, usually at 5:30 or 6 am, I do two things that activate my conscious and unconscious filters. One for selecting horoscopes and my second daily project, for screening lists of headline stories from each Apple News sources.  

How long it takes to select a flip-worthy story.   

Reminds me of how I remember my Masters thesis advisor saying he didn’t understand my research but gave me an “A.”  

I got to use a camera to record the scan path — where a person looked as I presented images a little faster each time and had them decide if it was the same or different image.  

I got to see if there was any connection between the speed of recognition of an image held in short-term memory and a similar eyeball pattern of search to find distinguishing features based on which to name the object.  

My one take away was at speeds when college freshmen couldn’t tell you what they saw, they could still recognize it. 

So, stuff comes in and we can’t see it, but we can react to it.

Which leads to a moment maybe three years earlier when I knew in my heart of hearts that law school wasn’t for me and returning to psychology was.  

Our professor using that annoying Socratic teaching method to sharpen our budding legal minds and kept on it and on it challenging everybody’s timid answer to why a holding in a legal case made good law.  

I hated it.  I read and reread case material I didn’t understand as homework. I lived by myself in a studio apartment on the more dangerous, but more affordable student side of the university town.  

But the professor in his mid-forties with dark hair and wire rim glasses drove home the point — a turning point for me — about the reliability of witnesses.  

When you and your girlfriend exit a movie theatre with another couple and one of you tries to fill the silence by asking, ‘So what did think about the movie?’ what do you say?  Do you list the plot structure attributes or how stunning the actress or handsome the leading actor was, or the music score, or …?  No, you answer you liked it or didn’t first.  And, then you list all the reasons why.

The second part becomes a position you discuss or defend with your friends over drinks.  

I realized I was much more interested in that sequence than imagining some future court room scene where I tried to trip up a witness on the stand into revealing there was a possibility she was wrong.

I wanted to know why someone did what they did.  Why your “lizard brain” has already decided and your logical brain explains your lizard’s choice after the fact.

Evidence

So Lizard, how did I do?

Random ones that make me want change my sign.

Am I?  No, not really.  As much as I love your duet, I’m not lifting your Holiday Tau today.  Sorry.

“2”  Steve Smith, 30, Stevie Nicks, 72: “You’re torn about whether to invest in a new tool. Definitely, using something different will amplify your capacities. Don’t rule out that which you make yourself. Tools of your very own will open up fresh avenues of exploration.” Gemini

Can I apply your Holiday Tau to writing the Report about My 1-year Experiment, and composing the second year — the pandemic experiment, and of course this year — the post-pandemic year (I hope) and the comparison of three years in April?  

“5”  Steve Howey, 42:Try not to get hung up on having a final, polished result because your time is better spent solving a number of problems, which you’ll never get to if you try to make any of them perfect.” Cancer

G&G, your TauBit of Wisdom tantalizes me today.  I forced myself to publish the first 9 days of My 1-Year Experiment in an evolving format. I forgot some of the editing and media limitations and the rules I followed before, which slowed me down at first, but maybe I should look forward to surpassing previous limits, eh?

“4”  Steve Greene, 34; Steve Guttenberg, 61:If you keep the same rules, you’ll get the same shaped result. You’re going for something else. Your process is evolving. Take away one of your rules to let it expand unimpeded by previous limits.” Virgo

Thanks for the afternoon off, today Steve.  You Holiday Tau’s permission reminded me of a cartoon I saw of a teacher in a class room calling on a kid who raised his hand.  Yes Billy she asked and he said, “May I be excused my brain is too full?”

“4”  Steve Harvey, 62: “Mindfulness gets plenty of play in your world lately — so much so that one might forget about the utter joys of the opposite state. Mindlessness certainly has its merits, especially in the sunshine of spring!  Capricorn

What’s Going On

Literally Bottled and Set Adrift from KnowWhere Atoll 

    • @KnowLabs suite of digital magazines jumps from 8003 to 8068 organically grown followers

Foresight

Quality-of-Life 

Long-Form

    • “Consilience: The Unity of Knowledge” by E.O. Wilson, an entomologist who studied colonies of ants for their insights.  But didn’t stop there, according to The Wall Street Journal, “A dazzling journey across the sciences and humanities in search of deep laws to unite them.” 
    • “True Believers,” the novel by Kurt Andersen (which seems to precede Fantasyland)? I like how he goes back and forth from now to the ‘60s in which the main character is writing a memoir, but needs “Okays” from her friends who had been hiding a secret for 40+ years that could ruin their careers?  Like, what’s my equivalent
    • “Disappearing Through the Skylight” by O.B. Hardison, Jr. which proceeded “Consilience” by a decade.  Hardison’s been described as a polymathic renaissance man who wrote, “… Nature has slipped, perhaps finally beyond our field of vision.”  What does it mean for “… science, history, art and architecture, music, language, ultimately, for humanity”? This one provides missing chunks of understanding where we came from and where we’re going.

Image Credit: Wikimedia Commons

Inspired by: Holiday Mathis – Creators Syndicate

CENTER FOR KNOWLEDGE CREATION AND INNOVATION

The Knowledge Path | Know Laboratories | Knowledge Banking | Knowledge ATMs | Western Skies and Island Currents | Best West Road Trips

S4 E25 — Accountability?

Bannon told Trump to focus on January 6th. That was the moment for a reckoning. If Republicans could cast enough of a shadow on Biden’s victory on January 6 it will be hard for Biden to govern. Millions of Americans would consider him illegitimate. They would ignore him.

“5”  Steve Greene, 34; Steve Guttenberg, 61; Stephen King, 72: “Your problems are not to blame for what ails you. Rather, these complications are what will grow you into a more creative and resourceful person. The things you must do to survive and thrive will be the source of your strength.” Virgo

Hi and welcome to Thursday’s 25th Episode in Season 4 of  Our Disruptively Resilient Year” on this 14th day of April in the spring of 2022.

We concluded the three-year examination of how bits of wisdom changed — during the “normal” pre-pandemic year compared to the pandemic year, and more recently to the paradoxically normal year. Season Four continues now within domestic and global chaos.

“The Tau of Steves: What You Don’t Know Could Fill a Book”

Table of Contents

Previously in Season Four, The Disruptively Resilient Year

S4 E24Another Spooky Role to Play on the Outside; S4 E23When In Doubt, Follow the MoneyS4 E22Now, Who Could Argue With That?

Related from Season Three, the Paradoxically Normal Year

S3 E25 Art Lives Upon Discussion, Upon Experiment, Upon Curiosity …; S3 E24Reunion on the Edge of the Pacific Ocean near Legoland? Hell Yeah!; S3 E23Free from the Pile of Rubble in Your Brain; S3 E22What’s the Experiment Got To Do with the Exodus from Barb’s Bunny Ranch?

Related from Season Two, the Pandemic Year

S2 E25Are You an Innie or Outie Thinker?; S2 E24Working Remote from KnowWhere Atoll; S2 E23Gaping Loss No Amount of Mourning Will Heal; S2 E22Paranoid Rose Review and Traffic-Copped Check Out Lines

Related from Season One, the Normal Year

S1 E25Day 25 of My 1-Year Experiment; S1 E24Day 24 of My 1-Year Experiment; S1 E23Day 23 of My 1-Year Experiment; S1 E22Day 22 of My 1-Year Experiment;

Context

And, the beat goes on.  History may not repeat itself, or will it?  Enjoy a peak back to where we’ve been in Season Four, our Disruptively Resident Year

S4 E18Hopelessly Naive or Too Numb to Know Any Better?

S4 E19The Reason Character and Honesty Don’t Count Anymore

S4 E20Resiliently Living Through Domestic and Global Chaos

S4 E21Not Since the War of 1812 

S4 E22Now, Who Could Argue With That?

S4 E23When In Doubt, Follow the Money

S4 E24Another Spooky Role to Play on the Outside

In “Peril,” Bob Woodward and Robert Costa reveal “Women for America First,” had filed a National Park Service permit for January 22 and 23 in Washington.

They subsequently amended their permit application for a rally and reserved space at Freedom Plaza near the White House for January 6, 2021.

Woodward and Costa discover that Bannon told Trump to focus on January 6th. That was “the moment for a reckoning.”

“We’re going to bury Biden on January 6th, fucking bury him.”

If Republicans could cast enough of a shadow on Biden’s victory on January 6, Bannon said, it will be hard for Biden to govern. Millions of Americans would consider him illegitimate. They would ignore him.

2020 Election’s Big Lie 

Trump seemed furious when his closest inner circle popped his bubble.

“You’re not going to be sworn in on the 20th. There is not a scenario in which you can be sworn in on the 20th,” Pence said. “We need to figure out how to deal with it, how we want to handle it. How we want to talk about it.”

Woodward and Costa revealed how during the ceremonial validation of the Electoral College results Ted Cruz had not planned to offer wholesale objections to every state’s count.

“You need to object to all the states that could be raised by the House,” Trump said.

But, the consensus of the group was not to do that. Trump asked, “Do you object to one or two then?”

They agreed to object to the first state brought up, Arizona. Trump was unhappy. He wanted aggression, objection to all the states that come up. “No,” Cruz said.

Next to Freedom Plaza, where the rally would be held, upstairs in a suite at the famed Willard Hotel Boris Epshteyn, a friend of Eric Trump, Rudy Giuliani and Steve Bannon plotted next steps.

Meanwhile, Trump directed his campaign to issue a statement claiming that he and Pence were in “total agreement that the Vice President has the power to act.”

Meanwhile, Jamie Raskin, in “Unthinkable: Trauma, Truth, and the Trials of American Democracy” felt like the majority of viewers witnessing the assault.

What seemed fundamentally discordant for me was the political ideology of the mob beyond the deep pools of racial hatred, xenophobia, anti-Semitism, and immigrant bashing.  

He never had imagined they would converge on Washington to 

Destroy corrupt politicians of both parties, traitorous police officers, lying media, agents of George Soros, defenders of the Clintons and the Obamas, other sinister, shadowy forces identified by conspiracy theorists in QAnon and by Trump’s authoritarian polemicists like Steve Bannon.

And after two impeachments attempts at accountability failed, it would be up to a future independent commission or select committee to investigate the nature of the behind-the-scenes organizing.

Raskin described how the official January 6 rally was hatched within the core Trump political entourage, among people like:

    • Roger Stone, 
    • Stephen Bannon, 
    • Michael Flynn, and 
    • other members of the Trump family; 
    • among key fundraisers like Michael Lindell, the MyPillow Guy, 
    • Linda McMahon, the former head of the Small Business Administration, and 
    • Julie Jenkins Fancelli, heiress to the Publix Super Market chain, who reportedly invested at least $300,000 in organizing the day’s official activities — “March to Save America” rally organizers and “Women for America First.”

And that led to investigating the major extremist groups like:

    • Proud Boys, 
    • the Three Percenters, 
    • the Oath Keepers, 
    • Aryan Nations, and other 
    • private right-wing militia groups.

Insurrection

When Trump crossed over from nonviolent and lawful means in pursuit of his absurd claims to inciting violence against Congress and the election and Vice President Pence to get him to violate the Constitution, that was when he entered the realm of insurrection.

Evidence

Random ones that make me want change my sign.

“4” Steve Carell, 57; Steve Martin, 74; Steve Wozniak, 69: “You usually don’t like it when people who don’t need help ask for it anyway. But who has the time to make sure each request is legit? Today it won’t matter. You’ll help others and you’re the one who will end up feeling lucky.” Leo

You got that one right.  Especially if the person asking keeps asking the same question over and over because she hasn’t taken the time I did to stumble through and do the work to figure it out.  But, alls fair in Love and a happy Life, eh dear?

“5”  Steve Greene, 34; Steve Guttenberg, 61; Stephen King, 72: “Your problems are not to blame for what ails you. Rather, these complications are what will grow you into a more creative and resourceful person. The things you must do to survive and thrive will be the source of your strength.” Virgo

I’ve got more work to do to stop triggers from the other side of the aisle.  Although both Emma the Baroness and I despair for families in Ukraine and the very real possibility that our country will once more be run like a mafia.

“3”  Steve Kerr, 54: “Those who make excuses or pass blame deprive themselves of the chance to learn the right way to do a task. You recognize this in others and avoid making the same mistake.” Libra

This observation feels similar in effect, but not emotion, to not doing the work and taking the easy way out.  Alas.

“5”  Steve Aoki, 41; Steven Spielberg, 74: “Growth takes time, but it doesn’t take forever. You’ve been patient, nurturing and positive, yet things haven’t formed to the shape you needed them to be. Nothing is so essential you can’t let it go. Start over new.” Sagittarius

So, either this is about spring cleaning or about taking stock, letting go of one or more of my passion projects and pivoting to a new start up.

“5”  Steve Harvey, 62; Stephan Patis, 53;  Stephen Hawking (1943 – 2018): “The task at hand is something you would do even if you were not paid to. Even so, don’t offer it for free. People will value it better if they pay for it.” Capricorn 

I’m taking this TauBit of Advice to Patreon — more specifically to only post to Tiers One to Three — nothing for free.

“5”  Steve Nash, 45: “Whatever you’re working with, make it your own. Forget about what a thing was designed to do. What do you need it to do? You’ll get completely original results because you’re not bound to the rules.” Aquarius

Okay, this doesn’t help me.  I can’t make these Episodes anything else than my own, am I right?  So, let’s summarize.  I should pivot, get paid or not worry about a thing and be happy that I can do what I love, even if I weren’t getting paid for it — which is what I did throughout my different careers and am definitely doing now.

What’s Going On

Literally Bottled and Set Adrift from KnowWhere Atoll

    • @KnowLabs suite of 36 digital magazines, according to my analytics, grew from 12559 this week to 12654 organically grown followers.
    • Orange County Beach Towns 216 viewers stopped by the week before.

Foresight

Quality-of-Life

Long-Form

    • “Here, Right Matters: An American Story” by Alexander Vindman. “We’d long been confused by the president’s policy of accommodation and appeasement of Russia, the United States’ most pressing major adversary. Russia’s president Vladimir Putin invaded Ukraine, seizing the Crimean Peninsula, attacking its industrial heartland, the Donbass, from the capital, Kyiv. By 2019, little had changed, Russian military and security forces and their proxy separatists continued to occupy the Donbass. The biggest change was to Ukraine’s importance as a bulwark against Russian aggression weeks earlier, the White House had abruptly put a hold on nearly four hundred million dollars.” 
    • David Enrich begins his book with a suicide in “Deutsche Bank Dark Towers: Deutsche Bank, Donald Trump, and an Epic Trail of Destruction” and then meticulously details the bank’s Russian money laundering operations. Deutsche’s Russian business surged after revenues had fallen 50% due to the 2008 financial crisis. Putin’s Russia, poured in to Deutsche from deals it did with VTB Bank, linked to the Kremlin’s intelligence apparatus. Deutsche positioned itself as a crucial cog in “The Laundromat” by doing what couldn’t be done — processing cross-border transactions for banks that were too small  and didn’t have offices outside their home countries.
    • “Unthinkable: Trauma, Truth, and the Trials of American Democracy” by Jamie Raskin recalls one tragedy no parent should endure — the suicide of his son — and then a second tragedy at almost the same time — the insurrection on January 6th 2021, that terrified he and his congressional peers who were tasked by the Constitution to routinely oversee the orderly transfer of power from one former president to the duly elected new President. 
    • “A Warning” by Anonymous (Miles Taylor) written prior to the January 6th Insurrection as an insider’s account documenting how frequently the former President’s behavior and rage without any “guard rails” showed just how far he would go to win the next election at any cost while spinning lies and misinformation on top of each other.  
    • “Peril” by Bob Woodward and Robert Costa provides anecdotes, stories and inside reporting documenting the controversial last days of Donald Trump’s presidency, as well as the presidential transition and early presidency of Joe Biden. 
    • “Devil’s Bargain: Steve Bannon, Donald Trump, and the Nationalist Uprising,” by Joshua Green tracks the money behind the scenes leading up to the 2016 presidential election and the growing influence of Steve Bannon’s network of extreme nationalists.

Image Credit: Wikimedia Commons

Inspired by Holiday Mathis – Creators Syndicate

CENTER FOR KNOWLEDGE CREATION AND INNOVATION

The Knowledge Path | Know Laboratories | Knowledge Banking | Knowledge ATMs | Western Skies and Island Currents | Best West Road Trip

S3 E33 — Do Meaningful Coincidences Really Exist?

I’ve always been intrigued by Carl Jung’s synchronicity theory — meaningful coincidences — which “holds that events are ‘meaningful coincidences’ if they occur with no causal relationship yet seem to be meaningfully related.”

The Tau of Steves: What You Don’t Know Could Fill a Book

“5”  Steve McQueen (1930 – 1980): You don’t set out to be original, but you’re working with something other than what was available in the example. Using different ingredients and techniques yields unique results.” Aries

Hi and welcome to Friday’s Episode 33 in Season 3 of  My Paradoxically Normal Year” on this 23rd day of April in the spring of 2021 — which is a three-year examination of how bits of wisdom changed during the “normal” pre-pandemic year and then in the pandemic year, and now months after.

The Tau of Steves: What You Don’t Know Could Fill a Book

Table of Contents

Previously from Season Three, the Paradoxically Normal Year

S3 E32But, Why Should You Care?; S3 E31Treat It Like a Pawn Ticket to Sketchier Things; S3 E30Steal These TauBits, Please. It’s Only Fair!

Related from Season Two, The Pandemic Year

S2 E33What Happens When Your Business Collapses?; S2 E32Trapped and Bored? Or Unleashing a Reinvention Wave?; S2 E31Getting Charged from Box Automattic-aly; S2 E30It’s Crazy. Why does Amazon Prime Work, but Netflix Doesn’t?

Related from Season One, The Normal Year

S1 E33Day 33 of My 1-Year Experiment; S1 E32Day 32 of My 1-Year Experiment; S1 E31Day 31 of My 1-Year Experiment; S1 E30Day 30 of My 1-Year Experiment

Context

Last time, you’ll recall, writing the Conclusion to my Report I drew inferences from my favorite mode of being — one that correlates well with my practice of lifting TauBits (TauLifts), selecting Holiday Tau and promoting TauBits of Wisdom — intuition.

Intuition is the subtle knowing without ever having any idea why you know it, more like a direct perception of truth, fact, who a person really is, how a situation will play out, what the future has in store for us.

Drawing on intuition, I’m now focusing on synchronicity and meaningful coincidences. 

Last night, by coincidence I tripped across a passage in Robert Parker’s “The Devil Wins” I read in my Kindle when Jesse Stone, Police Chief in Paradise says, 

I don’t believe in coincidences.” 

In various books, Harry Bosch in Michael Connelly’s series who worked in the LAPD robbery and homicide department (as did Stone), in “A Darkness More Than Night,” described: 

A strange constricting feeling filled his gut. He didn’t believe in coincidences… (It) was a coincidence that even a believer in coincidence would have a difficult time accepting.

So much for fictionalized police chiefs and detectives, tying up loose ends, relying on their hunches and reordering data, information and witness first hand accounts.

I’ve always been intrigued by Carl Jung’s synchronicity theory — meaningful coincidences — which “holds that events are ‘meaningful coincidences’ if they occur with no causal relationship yet seem to be meaningfully related.” 

According to Wikipedia:

“… skeptics (e.g. most psychologists) tend to dismiss the psychological experience of coincidences as just yet one more demonstration of how irrational people can be. Irrationality in this context means an association between the experience of coincidences and biased cognition in terms of poor probabilistic reasoning and a propensity for paranormal beliefs.”

So, while Stone and Bosch are both fictional, they aren’t irrational, biased, reasoning-challenged with a fondness for UFOs. 

But Wikipedia also included:

A survey (with 226 respondents) of the frequency of synchronicity in clinical settings found that: 

    • 44% of therapists reported synchronicity experiences in the therapeutic setting; and 
    • 67% felt that synchronicity experiences could be useful for therapy”
    • “… psychologists were significantly more likely than both counsellors and psychotherapists to agree that chance coincidence was an explanation for synchronicity, whereas, counsellors and psychotherapists were significantly more likely than psychologists to agree that a need for unconscious material to be expressed could be an explanation for synchronicity experiences in the clinical setting

And as a psychologist in training at the Masters level after my tour of duty in Vietnam what actually intrigued me was what this survey represented to me — clinical psychology as an art form but with a practical natural experiment attempt.

Synchronicity appeared in clinical settings as reported by 4 in 10 therapists and two-thirds felt as a tool synchronicity experiences could prove beneficial for therapeutic outcomes.

What now caught my eye was the which came first, the chicken or the egg implications.  Was it that chance coincidences explain synchronicity?  Or, encouraging the expression of unconscious material explained synchronicity events in clinical settings?

Sigmund Freud and Jung were pioneers in “Talking Therapy” though Jung was younger and at one point Freud felt he would take the mantle from Freud later in life.  

However Jung in 1916 published the English version as of his paper Psychology of the Unconscious making it clear that his views were taking a direction quite different from those of Freud. 

To distinguish his system from psychoanalysis, Jung called it analytical psychology.

Fast forward to the Consciousness Revolution of the 1960s and 1970s.  

For a period of time, largely in the 1970s meaningful coincidences manifested themselves in Lawrence Blair’s “Aquarian Science” as some sort of grand “consilience” big enough to include astrology and astronomy, mysticism and possibly anticipated string theory in theoretical physics.

Whereas our outer, rational memories show us only brief span on the surface of history behind us, our inner memories — through myth and symbol — detect currents of meaning beneath the future as well.”

“The outer chaos and confusion of our time is but the disturbance which characterizes the metamorphosis of all great rhythms, or aeon’s, into a new one; but inwardly, the iron-filings of a special kind of related knowledge are already polarizing themselves around a new pattern of Meaning, revealing that a deeper knowledge of universal laws is contingent on a deeper knowledge of the self, and the schism between the two wolds of science and religion is beginning to heal and to merge into a single majestic river of vision. 

 “Rhythms of Vision: The Changing Patterns of Belief” by Lawrence Blair, Ph.D.  published in 1975.

Evidence

What about today’s Holiday Tau, TauBits of Wisdom and the need for TauLifts? Synchronicity anyone?  Any meaningful coincidences?  How about a glimpse of a “majestic river of vision?”

Are we to interpret your TauBit of Wisdom as admonition to turn off conscious processing in favor of unconsciousness chewing?

“3”   Steve Zahn, 51: “Can there be peace without understanding? Of course! Sometimes peace is accepting what is, whether or not you get it. Consider giving up the need to process every bit of information, at least right now.” Scorpio

Random ones that make me want change my sign.

True enough, Steve I don’t.  I’m improvising a newer recipe.

“5”  Steve McQueen (1930 – 1980): You don’t set out to be original, but you’re working with something other than what was available in the example. Using different ingredients and techniques yields unique results.” Aries

So this was supposed to be a pain-free day for me.  Think again.  It takes a day to recover from my physical therapy sessions and my knee and hip are still sore.  Maybe, tomorrow?  

“3”  Steve Carell, 57; Steve Martin, 74; Steve Wozniak, 69: “People run, but really there’s no way to avoid it. Pain is as entwined with existence as is breathing. Accepting this inevitability makes pain-free times, such as you’ll have today, all the sweeter. You’ll live on wings of exuberance.” Leo

So G&G, where were you when the country could have used your Holiday Tau as advice for the previous administration.  Seems like that’s all they did.  Blame and name and avoid fixing or improving things other than a chance for reelection.

“5”  Steve Greene, 34; Steve Guttenberg, 61:The thing about blame is that it’s only one of many ways to package an outcome, and today it’s an entirely unnecessary one at that. Forget about blame. There is only what happened, and various ways for it to not happen again.” Virgo

I’m sure Steve this Holiday Tau, maybe not for you then, but for one of the Steves months ago, triggered my revelation that my greatest fear was public speaking.  Thinking back on it, it may have delayed my career transition from advisor to trainer and workshop leader.  Finding how to make it work for you is the Tau of Tau.

“5”  Steve Aoki, 41: “There are many ineffective ways to handle fear, which include ignoring it, running from it, pretending to be cool about it or letting it stop you. The proper way is to accept fear so you can harness it and make it work for you.” Sagittarius

You had me at “wildly divergent problems,” Steve.  The more interdependence and related parts, the better.  Give me chaos and complexity any time as long as you pay my fee.

“5”  Steve Nash, 45:It’s amazing what you can solve when you put your mind to it. Don’t even think about backing down from the wildly divergent problems because they will be the stage from which you shine brightest.” Aquarius

What’s Going On

Literally Bottled and Set Adrift from KnowWhere Atoll 

    • @KnowLabs suite of digital magazines jumps from 8003 to 8068 organically grown followers

Foresight

Quality-of-Life 

Long-Form

    • “Consilience: The Unity of Knowledge” by E.O. Wilson, an entomologist who studied colonies of ants for their insights.  But didn’t stop there, according to The Wall Street Journal, “A dazzling journey across the sciences and humanities in search of deep laws to unite them.” 
    • “True Believers,” the novel by Kurt Andersen (which seems to precede Fantasyland)? I like how he goes back and forth from now to the ‘60s in which the main character is writing a memoir, but needs “Okays” from her friends who had been hiding a secret for 40+ years that could ruin their careers?  Like, what’s my equivalent
    • “Disappearing Through the Skylight” by O.B. Hardison, Jr. which proceeded “Consilience” by a decade.  Hardison’s been described as a polymathic renaissance man who wrote, “… Nature has slipped, perhaps finally beyond our field of vision.”  What does it mean for “… science, history, art and architecture, music, language, ultimately, for humanity”? This one provides missing chunks of understanding where we came from and where we’re going.

Image Credit: Wikimedia Commons

Inspired by: Holiday Mathis – Creators Syndicate

CENTER FOR KNOWLEDGE CREATION AND INNOVATION

The Knowledge Path | Know Laboratories | Knowledge Banking | Knowledge ATMs | Western Skies and Island Currents | Best West Road Trips

S4 E24 — Another Spooky Role to Play on the Outside

Who are these people? Milley summarized and scribbled. Big Threat: domestic terrorism. Steve Bannon’s vision coming to life. Bring it all down, blow it up, burn it, and emerge with power.

The Tau of Steves: What You Don’t Know Could Fill a Book

“5”  Steve Zahn, 51: “You don’t set out on an adventure; you just set out. The harrowing fun starts when expectations are not met, tools fail and plans disintegrate. This is the kind of gift that money can’t buy.” Scorpio

Hi and welcome to Sunday’s 24th Episode in Season 4 of  Our Disruptively Resilient Year” on this 10th day of April in the spring of 2022.

The Tau of Steves: What You Don’t Know Could Fill a Book

Table of Contents

We concluded the three-year examination of how bits of wisdom changed — during the “normal” pre-pandemic year compared to the pandemic year, and more recently to the paradoxically normal year. 

Season Four continues now within domestic and global chaos.

Previously in Season Four, The Disruptively Resilient Year

S4 E23When In Doubt, Follow the MoneyS4 E22Now, Who Could Argue With That? S4 E21Not Since the War of 1812

Related from Season Three, the Paradoxically Normal Year

S3 E24Reunion on the Edge of the Pacific Ocean near Legoland? Hell Yeah!; S3 E23Free from the Pile of Rubble in Your Brain; S3 E22What’s the Experiment Got To Do with the Exodus from Barb’s Bunny Ranch?; S3 E21Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and My Curiosity Whisperer Walking a Yip-Yippy Dog

Related from Season Two, the Pandemic Year

S2 E24Working Remote from KnowWhere Atoll; S2 E23Gaping Loss No Amount of Mourning Will Heal; S2 E22Paranoid Rose Review and Traffic-Copped Check Out Lines; S2 E21Cycles of History Rhyming with Endlessly Disruptive Rhythms?

Related from Season One, the Normal Year

S1 E24Day 24 of My 1-Year Experiment; S1 E23Day 23 of My 1-Year Experiment; S1 E22Day 22 of My 1-Year Experiment; S1 E21Day 21 of My 1-Year Experiment;

Context

Bob Woodward and Robert Costa reported in their book “Peril,” that Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, General Milley, jotted some thoughts, “Who are these people?”

He jotted rapidly: 

    • “6MWE”
    • “Extreme Tea Party” 
    • “QAnon,” he added, taking note of the fully discredited conspiracy theory. 
    • “Patriot Movement,” a far-right militia. 
    • “We the People Movement” 
    • “Nazis” 
    • “Proud Boys” 
    • “The Oath Keepers” 
    • “Newsmax,” the conservative news website, which had been friendly toward Trump for a long time. 
    • “Epoch,” referring to the The Epoch Times, a far-right publication that was critical of the Chinese Communist Party. 

Milley summarized and scribbled. “Big Threat: domestic terrorism. Steve Bannon’s vision coming to life.” 

Bring it all down, blow it up, burn it, and emerge with power.

From the Devil’s Bargain

2016 Bannon’s Vision playing out as a Nationalism Movement

Bannon saw evidence of Western collapse in the influx of Muslim refugees and migrants across Europe and the United States—what he pungently termed “civilizational jihad personified by this migrant crisis.”

Bannon’s response to the rise of modernity was to set populist, right-wing nationalism against it.

He aligned himself with:           

    • Archconservative Catholics such as Raymond Leo Burke,
    • Nigel Farage and UKIP, 
    • Marine Le Pen’s National Front, 
    • Geert Wilders and the Party for Freedom, and 
    • Sarah Palin and the Tea Party.

For all his paranoid alarm, Bannon believes that the rise of nationalist movements across the world, from Europe to Japan to the United States, heralds a return to tradition.

“You have to control three things,” he explained, “Borders, currency, and military and national identity.

The clearest example of Traditionalist political influence today is in Russia.

Vladimir Putin’s chief ideologist, Alexander Dugin—whom Bannon has cited—translated (Julius) Evola’s work into Russian and later developed a Russian-nationalist variant of Traditionalism known as Eurasianism.

By installing Bannon, Conway, and later David Bossie to run his 2016 election campaign, Trump was handing the reins of a half-billion-dollar political enterprise to a seasoned team of professional anti-Clinton operatives.

These three figures from the Republican fringe, and the menagerie of characters they brought with them, were suddenly in charge of running major-party presidential campaign—against an opponent, Hillary Clinton, whom they’d been plotting to tear apart for the better part of twenty-five years.

Campaign to winning the 2016 election transition

Philip Rucker and Carol Leonnig wrote that Bannon had previously run the conservative website Breitbart conduit to his indispensable base,

“The racist, sexist, homophobic, xenophobic, Islamophobic ‘you name it.’”

Given what transpired since the early days of the Trump administration, it’s bizarre to consider who was being considered for key positions.

Initially, Kushner, Bannon, and others in Trump’s inner circle favored Rudy Giuliani for attorney general.

Trump allowed Bannon, son-in-law Jared Kushner, and daughter Ivanka to operate as independent forces.  

During one version of musical chairs, General John Kelly left his position at Homeland Security to reign in the cats and establish an adult in the administration based on his years of service in the Marines.

As White House Chief of Staff, “I’m here to defend the Constitution and to defend the rule of law,” General John Kelly told the other officials in attendance. “The oath doesn’t say anything in there about being loyal to the president. It doesn’t say anything in there about the GOP being more important than your integrity.”

Don McGahn, Chief Council and Bannon both asked for lawyer Ty Cobb’s help in removing Kushner and Ivanka. Cobb’s view was also partly shaped by a careful reading of the palace intrigue. Bannon might be the next to go instead.

Trump dismissed Bannon, embody the White House’s dysfunction and self-destructive tendencies. The discarding of Bannon underscored the fact that the president wanted all the glory for himself.

Yet, before the final curtain fell, over 140 people were granted clemency with a stroke of Trump’s pen near midnight on January 19, including: 

    • Rapper Lil Wayne, 
    • former Detroit mayor Kwame Kilpatrick, and 
    • countless other allies in politics and business, and
    • Bannon

It wasn’t the case of gone, but not forgotten, but more like Bannon had another role to play on the outside.

Evidence

Today’s Holiday Theme: 

In short, do not underestimate the danger of disrespectful words. They are like dryer lint — seemingly harmless garbage that is, in fact, highly flammable.

“5”  Steve Zahn, 51: “You don’t set out on an adventure; you just set out. The harrowing fun starts when expectations are not met, tools fail and plans disintegrate. This is the kind of gift that money can’t buy.” Scorpio

So this is the 4th Season of my adventure — what was intended to last one year living like an artist in a natural experiment.  Then came the pandemic.  And followed by a four-year administration seemingly immune to accountability, and then a different new normal post-pandemic and now one within a global crisis a potential WWIII.  Where is the fun?  Which tools haven’t we used? 

Random ones that make me want change my sign.

“4”  Steve McQueen (1930 – 1980): “Whether you choose to hang back and observe or jump in and participate, do it because you want to, not because someone is pressuring you. If you need support in standing up for yourself, here it is.” Aries

Savvy advice for any introvert like me.  Like Raskin, I never envisioned an insurrection.  I naively hoped removal by a fair and square election would put the Putin-like propaganda from the Oval Office out to sea.  Alas …

“4”  Steve Smith, 30, Stevie Nicks, 72: “Emotions warp the space-time continuum. Fear, waiting and discomfort make the seconds go by agonizingly slow. Joy, fascination and fun speed things up.” Gemini

What a brilliant opening line — warping space-time continuum with emotions.  But, the observation that wallowing in FUD stretches the sense to passing time is golden.  As is all those joyful moments that slip by in an instant.

“4”  Steve Aoki, 41; Steven Spielberg, 74: “As playwrights know, people have a very short attention span for exposition. You’ll quickly get to the heart of the story and have the complete attention of your audience.” Sagittarius

What is it that parents always say?  Do as I say, not as I do.  My only hope today is to have the format for today’s episode help me help you get to the heart of the story.  Does it work?

Steve Harvey, 62; Stephan Patis, 53;  Stephen Hawking (1943 – 2018): “New people juice your curiosity. You’ll learn more through friendly playfulness and observation than you could possibly find out by asking direct questions.” Capricorn

What’s Going On

Literally Bottled and Set Adrift from KnowWhere Atoll

    • @KnowLabs suite of 36 digital magazines, according to my analytics, grew from 12559 this week to 12654 organically grown followers.
    • Orange County Beach Towns 172 viewers stopped by the week before.

Foresight

Quality-of-Life

Long-Form

    • “Here, Right Matters: An American Story” by Alexander Vindman. “We’d long been confused by the president’s policy of accommodation and appeasement of Russia, the United States’ most pressing major adversary. Russia’s president Vladimir Putin invaded Ukraine, seizing the Crimean Peninsula, attacking its industrial heartland, the Donbass, from the capital, Kyiv. By 2019, little had changed, Russian military and security forces and their proxy separatists continued to occupy the Donbass. The biggest change was to Ukraine’s importance as a bulwark against Russian aggression weeks earlier, the White House had abruptly put a hold on nearly four hundred million dollars.” 
    • David Enrich begins his book with a suicide in “Deutsche Bank Dark Towers: Deutsche Bank, Donald Trump, and an Epic Trail of Destruction” and then meticulously details the bank’s Russian money laundering operations. Deutsche’s Russian business surged after revenues had fallen 50% due to the 2008 financial crisis. Putin’s Russia, poured in to Deutsche from deals it did with VTB Bank, linked to the Kremlin’s intelligence apparatus. Deutsche positioned itself as a crucial cog in “The Laundromat” by doing what couldn’t be done — processing cross-border transactions for banks that were too small  and didn’t have offices outside their home countries.
    • “Unthinkable: Trauma, Truth, and the Trials of American Democracy” by Jamie Raskin recalls one tragedy no parent should endure — the suicide of his son — and then a second tragedy at almost the same time — the insurrection on January 6th 2021, that terrified he and his congressional peers who were tasked by the Constitution to routinely oversee the orderly transfer of power from one former president to the duly elected new President. 
    • “A Warning” by Anonymous (Miles Taylor) written prior to the January 6th Insurrection as an insider’s account documenting how frequently the former President’s behavior and rage without any “guard rails” showed just how far he would go to win the next election at any cost while spinning lies and misinformation on top of each other.  
    • “Peril” by Bob Woodward and Robert Costa provides anecdotes, stories and inside reporting documenting the controversial last days of Donald Trump’s presidency, as well as the presidential transition and early presidency of Joe Biden. 
    • “Devil’s Bargain: Steve Bannon, Donald Trump, and the Nationalist Uprising,” by Joshua Green tracks the money behind the scenes leading up to the 2016 presidential election and the growing influence of Steve Bannon’s network of extreme nationalists.

Image Credit: Wikimedia Commons

Inspired by Holiday Mathis – Creators Syndicate

CENTER FOR KNOWLEDGE CREATION AND INNOVATION

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S3 E32 — But, Why Should You Care?

If you know your MBTI type already — one of 16 — as my Executive MBA students do, then you translate it into my Talent Profile System — one of 16 — so can choose the best and worst places to work for you, including growth or decline stages, when new offers come rolling in.

“5”  Steve Aoki, 41: “You will take chances and perform experiments, each risk teaching you, among other things, how to access your intuition in the pursuit of meaningful results.” Sagittarius

Hi and welcome to Thursday’s Episode 32 in Season 3 of  My Paradoxically Normal Year” on this 22nd day of April in the spring of 2021 — which is a three-year examination of how bits of wisdom changed during the “normal” pre-pandemic year and then in the pandemic year, and now months after.

The Tau of Steves: What You Don’t Know Could Fill a Book

Table of Contents

Previously from Season Three, the Paradoxically Normal Year

S3 E31Treat It Like a Pawn Ticket to Sketchier Things; S3 E30Steal These TauBits, Please. It’s Only Fair!; S3 E29Why 83.3% of the Time I Swiped Your Tau

Related from Season Two, The Pandemic Year

S2 E32Trapped and Bored? Or Unleashing a Reinvention Wave?; S2 E31Getting Charged from Box Automattic-aly; S2 E30It’s Crazy. Why does Amazon Prime Work, but Netflix Doesn’t?; S2 E29Three Months That Changed the World

Related from Season One, The Normal Year

S1 E32Day 32 of My 1-Year Experiment; S1 E31Day 31 of My 1-Year Experiment; S1 E30Day 30 of My 1-Year Experiment; S1 E29Day 29 of My 1-Year Experiment

Context

I’m still working my way through the Conclusions Section of the 1-year Natural Experiment Report.  Not quite awake, I found myself swimming in introversion, thinkers, INTP and idea packaging.

But, mostly intuition, the “N-word” in INTP, not to be confused with the “I-word” meaning introverted.

What I’d been writing about was how well my idea packaging description (113 SPIP) syncs with my Myers-Briggs Temperament, INTP.  

But, why should you care? 

If you know your MBTI type already — one of 16 — as my Executive MBA students do, then you translate it into my Talent Profile system — one of 16 — so can choose the best and worst places to work for you, including growth or decline stages, when new offers come rolling in.

The MBTI is the theory of psychological type originally developed by Carl Jung and “operationalized” by two Americans, a mother and daughter, Katharine Cook Briggs and Isabel Briggs Myers.

A quick Google search about my psychological type finds:

The INTP type describes a person who is energized by (spending) time alone (Introverted), who focuses on ideas and concepts rather than facts and details (iNtuitive), who makes decisions based on logic and reason (Thinking) and who prefers to be spontaneous and flexible rather than planned and organized (Perceiving).

Add to Google a quick Wikipedia inquiry and you find more about “P”.

Sensing and intuition are the information-gathering (perceiving) functions. Those who prefer intuition tend to trust information that is less dependent upon the senses, that can be associated with other information (either remembered or discovered by seeking a wider context or pattern). They may be more interested in future possibilities. For them, the meaning is in the underlying theory and principles which are manifested in the data.”

For most of my last career, I realized intuition and the process of visualizing something in advisory sessions helped me gain a perspective or framework for offering recommendations and original connections. 

Further, except for the I or the E, the NTP mirrored each other as did the other sets of 8 combinations I identified yesterday. 

According to a dictionary thinkers conceive, imagine, fancy, realize, envisage, envision or mean to form an idea. Somehow an idea enters your mind “… with or without deliberate consideration or reflection.” 

Ideas stimulate or challenge your intellect or mind.  If you’re thinking you have an idea, belief, or thought about something.

But, intuition I believe is more influential.

The two, thinking and intuition, combine for me when I hear enough in a 1-hour advisory session or in a Starbucks conversation over coffee or breakfast (remember those) to trigger a thought-video which frames my response and quickly captures a solution to a problem they bring.  

Or, how in sitting and reflecting on trends and combinations until, like during this rain storm, a picture emerges and triggers an “aha” moment. 

In other circumstances my brain unconsciously keeps chewing on the noise, data, information, knowledge and wisdom I’ve been exposed to — thinking — for a long time until the insight arrives.

Intuition is the ability to acquire knowledge from direct access without the need for conscious reasoning, likely from an instinctive feeling. 

You know, like in those detective books, TV shows and the Harry Bosch Amazon Prime series — hunches and assumptions formed on the basis of past experience and cumulative knowledge. 

Intuitive hunches arrive wholly formed and quickly, without conscious awareness of the underlying mental process of information. 

Intuition is the subtle knowing without ever having any idea why you know it, more like a direct perception of truth, fact, who a person really is, how a situation will play out, what the future has in store for us.

Evidence

If all that, then you probably wouldn’t be wrong by stating the obvious I probably can’t say why I select or confirm my early morning choices of Holiday Tau.  Or that I’m disappointed that the TauBit of Wisdom sucked for Zahnny, the Fonz, Emma the Baroness and me today.

Oh well, it’s on to a life of petty larceny.

Random ones that make me want change my sign.

Oh, great.  Just great.  Here I lay out my case for a correlation between intuition and TauBits of Wisdom and you two go all counter-intuitive on me.  Haha, now I’m second guessing why I chose your Holiday Tau.  Seriously, though this is restating if you want something done quickly give it to a busy person.

“4”  Steve Smith, 30, Stevie Nicks, 72: “It doesn’t seem like it would be so, but having less time to work on a project will lead to more creative results. The crunch will focus you on what matters and you’ll be smart about how you use your minutes.” Gemini

G&G I have to thank you for your Holiday Tau.  In the last two days I published four articles on my site, Knowledge ATMs, about the first 5 days of my 1-year experiment.  Now if I can juggle everything else, I should be able to pump out one or two a day consistently.

“5”  Steve Greene, 34; Steve Guttenberg, 61:Your working habits didn’t really need to improve, and yet they will as you make a practice of keeping up a certain pace. You are becoming more confident in your capacity to turn out results in any given timeframe.” Virgo

So coach, this reminds me of one of my clinical psychology professors who told his class about which theory he follows when working with patients — Freud, Jung, B.F. Skinner?  His was a practical answer.  They all work and none of them work, it depends upon the patient.  

“5”  Steve Kerr, 54: You’re so productive now because you’re using everything you feel to fuel your endeavors — the good, the bad. There’s nothing that can’t be used here, so just throw it all into the engine.” Libra

And, so there it is.  Thanks Steve for your Holiday Tau.  You’ve rolled everything into one — experiments, intuition and meaningful results.

“5”  Steve Aoki, 41: “You will take chances and perform experiments, each risk teaching you, among other things, how to access your intuition in the pursuit of meaningful results.” Sagittarius

What’s Going On

Literally Bottled and Set Adrift from KnowWhere Atoll 

    • @KnowLabs suite of digital magazines jumps from 8003 to 8068 organically grown followers

Foresight

Quality-of-Life 

Long-Form

    • “Consilience: The Unity of Knowledge” by E.O. Wilson, an entomologist who studied colonies of ants for their insights.  But didn’t stop there, according to The Wall Street Journal, “A dazzling journey across the sciences and humanities in search of deep laws to unite them.” 
    • “True Believers,” the novel by Kurt Andersen (which seems to precede Fantasyland)? I like how he goes back and forth from now to the ‘60s in which the main character is writing a memoir, but needs “Okays” from her friends who had been hiding a secret for 40+ years that could ruin their careers?  Like, what’s my equivalent?
    • “Disappearing Through the Skylight” by O.B. Hardison, Jr. which proceeded “Consilience” by a decade.  Hardison’s been described as a polymathic renaissance man who wrote, “… Nature has slipped, perhaps finally beyond our field of vision.”  What does it mean for “… science, history, art and architecture, music, language, ultimately, for humanity”? This one provides missing chunks of understanding where we came from and where we’re going.

Image Credit: Wikimedia Commons

Inspired by: Holiday Mathis – Creators Syndicate

CENTER FOR KNOWLEDGE CREATION AND INNOVATION

The Knowledge Path | Know Laboratories | Knowledge Banking | Knowledge ATMs | Western Skies and Island Currents | Best West Road Trips