S3 E27 — What the World Needs Now Before It’s Too Late

And, it’s part one of our segment we call “Listen Up Expectant Mothers” when we ask: What do expectant mothers wish for their about-to-be newborns?  

The Tau of Steves: What You Don’t Know Could Fill a Book

“5”  Steve Greene, 34; Steve Guttenberg, 61:Maybe it is not your purpose to incite curiosity and show people less obvious truths, but that is the natural result of your devotion to a meaningful interest that, in some way, pertains to us all.” Virgo

Hi and welcome to Sunday’s Episode 27 in Season 3 of  My Paradoxically Normal Year” on this 11th day of April in the spring of 2021 — which is a three-year examination of how bits of wisdom changed during the “normal” pre-pandemic year and then in the pandemic year, and now months after.

Previously from Season Three, the Paradoxically Normal Year

S3 E26Following Alice Down the Rabbit Hole; S3 E25 Art Lives Upon Discussion, Upon Experiment, Upon Curiosity …;  S3 E24Reunion on the Edge of the Pacific Ocean near Legoland? Hell Yeah!

Related from Season Two, The Pandemic Year

S2 E27Why I Have to Keep Leo da V on a Leash and So Should You; S2 E26Rethinking the N-Word; S2 E25Are You an Innie or Outie Thinker?; S2 E24Working Remote from KnowWhere Atoll

Related from Season One, The Normal Year

S1 E27Day 27 of My 1-Year Experiment; S1 E26Day 26  of My 1-Year Experiment; S1 E25Day 25 of My 1-Year Experiment; S1 E24Day 24 of My 1-Year Experiment

Context

And, it’s part one of our segment we call “Listen Up Expectant Mothers” when we ask: What do expectant mothers wish for their about-to-be newborns?  

Short answer is to listen to Rascal Flat’s “My Wish” and Rod Stewart’s “Forever Young” and read on.

Like Tau, we have the Greeks to thank for our name, Steve. 

As you recall, Tau in ancient times was used as a symbol for life or resurrection, whereas the eighth letter of the Greek alphabet, theta, was considered the symbol of death.

Here’s the pitch for bringing more Steves into the world!

Stephen comes from Greeks, according to Wikipedia: 

From the Latin Stephanus, which is from the Greek Stephanos, a name derived from stephanos (a crown, a garland). 

The name is borne in the Bible by St Stephen, one of the seven chosen to assist the apostles, and the first Christian martyr. 

Var: Stefan, Stefen, Stefon, Stephan, Stephon, Stevan, Steven, Stevon. Short: Steve.

Stephen or Steven is a common English first name. It is particularly significant to Christians, as it belonged to Saint Stephen an early disciple and deacon who, according to the Book of Acts, was stoned to death; 

he is widely regarded as the first martyr (or “protomartyr“) of the Christian Church. 

The name “Stephen” (and its common variant “Steven”) is derived from Greek Στέφανος (Stéphanos), a first name from the Greek word στέφανος (stéphanos), meaning “wreath, crown” and by extension “reward, honor, renown, fame”, from the verb στέφειν (stéphein), “to encircle, to wreathe”.

In Ancient Greece, crowning wreaths (such as laurel wreaths) were given to the winners of contests. 

Originally, as the verb suggests, the noun had a more general meaning of any “circle”—including a circle of people, a circling wall around a city, and, in its earliest recorded use, the circle of a fight, which is found in the Iliad of Homer.

Now comes the gut wrenching news:  

In the United Kingdom, it peaked during the 1950s and 1960s as one of the top ten male first names (ranking third in 1954) but had fallen to twentieth by 1984 and had fallen out of the top one hundred by 2002. 

The name was ranked 201 in the United States in 2009, according to the Social Security Administration. 

The name reached its peak popularity in 1951 but remained very common through the mid-1990s, when popularity started to decrease in the United States.

Not quite as bad as what togetherness means for us during the Pandemic year(s), but still sad.  

Evidence

You could say unless our luck and fortune change we’ll remain on the endangered list on a path “going places” to extinction.  

Random ones that make me want change my sign.

Honestly, Today’s Birthday sucked.  You’ll just have to take my word on it.

From Saturday, but setting up today’s fresh start:

Navigating is a lot easier when you know where you are. Without that information, the map may as well be just a random pretty picture. Getting places is simple: Know where you are, determine where you want to be, and then solve for the difference. 

All together now, but wanting to escape — no not from you Emma the Baroness — let’s turn our fortune to the week ahead, and shop — Emma the Baroness — for more bargains heading our way humming and skipping with beginner’s luck.

Holiday Forecast for the Week Ahead: 

It’s a welcome placement for many, signifying the following turns of fortune: Coveted things become accessible. Unaffordable things become affordable either because the price goes down or the spending money goes up.”

So, if I’m getting this right, Steve, your Holiday Tau says I’m good at navigating, maybe through this whitewater rafting thing we call life because I have GPS and can solve for the difference?  It’s the process, not the glory.

“4”  Steve Howey, 42:You’ll make a proactive and deliberate attempt to achieve an aim that is not achieved by most people. It’s nice when this gets noticed today, but honestly, you’re doing it for the challenge, not the glory.  Cancer

Haha.  What if it is my purpose, G&G to curious-up for some truth revealing?  Is your Holiday Tau just as meaningful?

“5”  Steve Greene, 34; Steve Guttenberg, 61:Maybe it is not your purpose to incite curiosity and show people less obvious truths, but that is the natural result of your devotion to a meaningful interest that, in some way, pertains to us all.” Virgo

Hi Steve.  Does your TauBit of Wisdom have anything to do with Tau — which is 2pi?  Making it easier and more elegant for solving geometric problems? Nope? Didn’t think so.

“4”  Steve Harvey, 62: “The people you’ll deal with aren’t entirely rational. You understand them anyway because neither are you. Also, there’s a good chance that the seemingly illogical equation figures out perfectly on deeper levels.” Capricorn

What’s Going On

Literally Bottled and Set Adrift from KnowWhere Atoll 

    • @KnowLabs suite of digital magazines jumps from 7816 to 7930 organically grown followers

Foresight

Quality-of-Life 

Long-Form

    • “Consilience: The Unity of Knowledge” by E.O. Wilson, an entomologist who studied colonies of ants for their insights.  But didn’t stop there, according to The Wall Street Journal, “A dazzling journey across the sciences and humanities in search of deep laws to unite them.” 
    • “True Believers,” the novel by Kurt Andersen (which seems to precede Fantasyland)? I like how he goes back and forth from now to the ‘60s in which the main character is writing a memoir, but needs “Okays” from her friends who had been hiding a secret for 40+ years that could ruin their careers?  Like, what’s my equivalent? “Disappearing Through the Skylight” by O.B. Hardison, Jr. which proceeded “Consilience” by a decade.  Hardison’s been described as a polymathic renaissance man who wrote, “… Nature has slipped, perhaps finally beyond our field of vision.”  What does it mean for “… science, history, art and architecture, music, language, ultimately, for humanity”? This one provides missing chunks of understanding where we came from and where we’re going.

Image Credit: Wikimedia Commons

Inspired by: Holiday Mathis – Creators Syndicate

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