What I didn’t know about publishing a book could, well fill a book.

I found almost 200 articles in my knowledge bank for “WordPress.org” beginning in July of 2016 and ending more recently in January 2018

 

Day Six:  Set up WordPress under your freelance business domain.

AnyWired said:

Every freelancer should have an online portfolio, even if it’s very simple.

If you’re a designer with time to spare you can probably take control of this step.

And, then as if it is as simple as just saying it (to me):

If you want a quick solution that is quite effective, download WordPress <http://wordpress.org/download/>  and install it under your domain name.

WTF?

What does that even mean?

It wasn’t clear to me what the difference between a domain name and a website, let alone download, install and host your own.

This whole day (Day 6) felt confusing and bewildering to me.

First of all I’ve cheated – I’m not really planning on freelancing.

I’ve undertaken this hugely time-consuming project called dumping everything you know into a manuscript

What you know (or you think) is true and helpful based on the kudos from your clients.

  • I didn’t know what I didn’t know.
  • I didn’t know where to start.
  • I didn’t know how to get smart quickly.

My one hour a day devoted to practicing my writing had already expanded to four or five hours a day before work, at lunch, after work and into the early evening.

And that was purely using a template for “Pages” that made it easy to write and publish a, well, self-published ebook.

 

In my ignorance I felt I couldn’t answer what came first, the chicken or the egg.

So, my egg-product is a book manuscript and my chicken is a website to attract potential audiences, right?

What I didn’t know about publishing a book could, well fill a book.

You need a name, a title.

Better check the first place I could think of – Amazon.

A year ago I couldn’t find a name that came close to what I thought the book was about, when it was completed.

Not as I had conceived of it and outlined it.

“The Knowledge Path”

The only variations I came across seemed esoteric.

Mine was practical.

On to GoDaddy.

What about domain names?

I typed in variations.

As soon as I found one with a .com in it I reserved it and followed Daddy’s directions for buying it.

I had to pay two years worth.

Falling into a techno hell, I couldn’t figure what came next.

Nobody recommended GoDaddy as a host.

AnyWired, and a bunch of internet marketing types I found in my knowledge bank, recommended WordPress.

If I didn’t know how to download WordPress.org under my domain, then what?

Just dipping into my knowledge bank I found 80 different research articles over a five-year period beginning in June 2012 and ending in July of 2017  for “WordPress” alone.

WordPress com or org?

Then, I discovered I had a choice to make “.com” or “.org”.

Did that mean “WordPress.org” forced me into a non-profit “business model”?

Doesn’t it make more sense to choose “WordPress.com”?

Made sense to me.

But know, oh I mean NO.

“Org” provides many more choices which should have been a warning.

But, being clueless I expected smooth sailing.

Tsunami.

Is more like it.

I nearly drowned.

I found almost 200 articles in my knowledge bank for “WordPress.org” beginning in July of 2016 and ending more recently in January 2018.

Top 3 Hosting

And, what don’t I know about hosting?

Which criteria should I use to make my decision?

Again my knowledge bank.

From the summer and winter of 2012 and then a more urgent jump to the winter and spring of 2017.

WordPress.org smartened me up:

Minimum requirements, and choosing one from the crowd can be a chore. Just like flowers need the right environment to grow, WordPress works best when it’s in a rich hosting environment.

We’ve dealt with more hosts than you can imagine; in our opinion, the hosts below represent some of the best and brightest of the hosting world.

If you do decide to go with one of the hosts below and click through from this page, some will donate a portion of your fee back—so you can have a great host and support WordPress.org at the same time.

Single Site Installation or Multisite?

Wait, what?

You need to find a host.

Well, I’ve just paid for six domains in a just-in-case protection of my potential intellectual property.

Do I really want to find six different hosts?

What are my alternatives?

Beginning in March and continuing until July 2017 I discovered 78 expert articles and YouTube videos producing eye-glassy technical overkill to a simpleton like me.

Just about the time I gave up trying to grasp multisite, domain mapping, plugins and codex the newer version of WordPress. org included it.

Sigh of relief.

My choice simplified.

Choose one of the three hosts that supported multisite at a reasonable cost.

I chose SiteGround.

I wanted to GrowBig!

Day Five: Repeating 1st Grade

Day Four: Packages for Producing Profits

Day 3.5:  Pink, Pitches and Pixar